Arts


Q&A with Pass By Catastrophe musician Zach Plante ’18

Alumnus and musician Zach Plante ’18 has taken his passion for music coast to coast and is set to release his first extended play record with the band Pass By Catastrophe on Sept. 27. Plante, who plays bass, guitar and piano in Pass By Catastrophe, is accompanied by Dexter Simpson, Max Kilberg and ...


Arts

Review: ‘The Goldfinch’ fails to live up to novel’s standard

September 16, 2019 9:31pm

When word broke that Donna Tartt’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “The Goldfinch” would be adapted into a movie last year, I sighed and dreaded the worst. There is something sacred that is destroyed when a much-beloved novel makes its on-screen debut. Movie adaptations of novels rarely do their written counterparts justice. Instead, they bury them in piles of scathing reviews and Rotten Tomato ratings that sully not only the film’s reputation but also that of the novel (for example, “The Hunger Games”). 


Arts

Q&A with Jeff Sharlet, author of Netflix-adapted ‘The Family’

August 19, 2019 7:31pm

In his two books “The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power” and “C-Street: The Fundamentalist Threat to American Democracy,” English and creative writing professor Jeff Sharlet takes deep dives into the political influence of the Christian organization known as “The Fellowship” or “The Family” both within and beyond the U.S.  Recently adapted into a five-episode Netflix docuseries titled “The Family,” Sharlet’s shocking exploration of the entanglement of church and state focuses on high-profile politicians from all over the world who had personal connections to Doug Coe, the former head of the organization. In an interview with The Dartmouth, Sharlet discusses the Family, his experience investigating the organization, as well as the process of adapting his literary work into a new medium.


Arts

Review: HBO’s ‘Euphoria’ presents a diagnosis of Generation Z

August 8, 2019 10:20pm

In the Drake-produced HBO series “Euphoria,” Generation Z is diagnosed and deified. Drawing attention to teen sex lives, drug abuse, family troubles and identity crises, “Euphoria” defines a generation by its most dramatic manifestations. The show’s narrator, lead and Gen Z translator Rue Bennett, played by former Disney Channel star Zendaya, is a biracial teenager struggling with drug addiction and the loss of her father.


Arts

Review: Aretha Franklin’s musicality astounds in ‘Amazing Grace’

July 18, 2019 9:38pm

“Amazing Grace,” the 2018 movie about the two days spent recording Aretha Franklin’s bestselling live album of the same name, showed at the Hopkins Center for the Arts last weekend. The movie is a true feat, resurrecting footage taken at the event in 1972 but unavailable until now due to technical problems in which video failed to sync with the sound. Finally, in this incredible film, we are able to see the Queen of Soul perform her album “Amazing Grace” at the New Temple Missionary Baptist Church in Watts, Los Angeles.


arts

Review: ‘Ma’ fails to be a horror film, let alone a good horror film

July 8, 2019 5:59pm

Typically, disappointment has shaped my experience with horror movies. I watch them expecting to be scared and they wind up making me laugh more than some top-billed comedies. Incohesive plots, stupid characters and cliché twists are far too prevalent in most commercially successful horror films. I wish I could say this spring’s latest horror film, “Ma” was any different, but the most credit I can give the film is for its self-awareness — “Ma” knows just how campy it is. 


Arts

Album Review: Snoh Aalegra’s next project promises to deliver

June 20, 2019 11:04pm

On June 14, Iranian-Swedish singer-songwriter Snoh Aalegra released a new song, “Find Someone Like You,” in anticipation of her sophomore album coming in August, “-Ugh, those feels again.”  “Find Someone Like You” delivers what Aalegra always promises: real emotions with R&B classic backing and Aalegra’s velvety vocals. Often compared to Amy Winehouse, Aalegra is more influenced by R&B but listeners may find that the comparison rings truest for Aalegra’s vocals, especially in this latest song. 


Arts

"Game of Thrones" fails to "break the wheel" in its final season

May 27, 2019 11:16pm

At this point, it’s no secret that the eighth and final season of “Game of Thrones” was extremely polarizing. The mileage of fans and critics varied, but the general consensus seems to be that the final three episodes torched what has quite possibly become the most popular TV series of all time. Showrunners David Benioff ’92 and D.B. Weiss resolved the show’s two major plot threads by essentially splitting these last six episodes into two mini-seasons; whereas episodes one through three feature the long-awaited confrontation with the White Walkers, episodes four through six cover the subsequent power struggle over the Iron Throne, the seat of power in the story’s fictional Seven Kingdoms. While the first arc was generally well received, it’s the baffling storytelling in the second that will haunt “Game of Thrones” forever. 


Arts

Review: ‘Boston Calling’ Music Festival lives up to the hype

May 27, 2019 10:23pm

Going to a music festival is always an exciting experience to look forward to, but I have to admit I wasn’t expecting too much from Boston Calling. In the wake of Dartmouth’s Green Key, I felt I had my share of concerts for the term and was preemptively annoyed with the loud and obnoxious drunk people I would inevitably be surrounded or suffocated by at the concert venue. In short, going to Boston Calling felt more like a poorly-timed task that I had to complete rather than an exciting weekend away from campus.


Arts

Review: ‘Homecoming: A Film by Beyoncé’ is illuminating

May 22, 2019 8:57pm

We have all seen it: a huge sensation, a star burning brightly and boldly. But then, the star crashes down, never to resurface except in commercials for yogurt and the occasional magazine shot that boasts a collection of “Hollywood Has-Beens: Where Are They Now?” Beautiful poetry, films and plays have been written on the idea that there is an upper limit to the number of stars our world can worship and, thus, some must fall. But not Beyoncé. Never Beyoncé.


Arts

Review: Netflix’s series ‘Bonding’ is derivative and unnuanced

May 20, 2019 9:29pm

BDSM is a topic of fascination that has been rising bit by bit outside of the shadow of stigma in recent years. With videos like Buzzfeed’s “Couples Try Bondage For The First Time,” released two years ago, and “I Became A Dominatrix To Control My Anxiety,” released just a year and a half after — with plenty of other tangentially related videos in between — it’s clear that BDSM is no longer something people are ashamed of talking about. If anything, kinky has become cool, and there’s a large market of people who want to know more. 


Arts

Review: ‘Father of the Bride’ is dark despite bright melodies

May 20, 2019 11:18pm

It’s a recurring theme in discussions amongst Vampire Weekend fans that their albums correspond to seasons. Their self-titled debut album, full of perky strings and New England imagery, is reminiscent of a collegiate fall. Their sophomore effort, “Contra,” with its bright synths and upbeat tempos, brings to mind a sunny summer day. And “Modern Vampires of the City,” their third album, is the definition of wintry, with its black and white cover and its existential, morbid themes.


arts

Renovations make Hood Museum more accessible to community

May 17, 2019 12:40am

I’ve never thought much about how art is moved. We can carry small pieces or move them on a cart, but what about the massive ones? Like “Guernica” or “Water Lilies” or “Hovor,” a piece on display in the new Hood Museum of Art? The answer: a massive elevator, one story high, that could fit at least eight normal elevators inside it. This is my first point of contact with the inner workings of the Hood Museum of Art. 


arts

Q&A with Two Friends musician Eli Sones

May 17, 2019 12:20am

In the days before this year’s Green Key concert, The Dartmouth sat down with Eli Sones, one half of the LA-based DJ group Two Friends, best known for their extensive collection of “Big Bootie” mixes. A Los Angeles native and long-time music lover, Sones began pursuing music seriously while in high school and has continued evolving artistically ever since. Working alongside his childhood bestfriend and fellow DJ-Producer Matthew Halper — the other half of Two Friends — Sones has learned a lot about the importance of conenction and cooperation throughout his musical career. Over the course of the interview, Sones shared his insights as a musician who is well-versed in collaboration and creation.