Arts



Stephanie Everett '19 looks forward to performing for local theaters.

Arts

Student Spotlight: Stephanie Everett ’19 performs with passion

May 13, 2019 10:06pm

For Stephanie Everett ’19, her career on stage far predates her recent roles in the Dartmouth productions of “Eclipsed” and “Into the Woods.” Rather, it dates back to her fourth-grade talent show, in which she and four other girls performed “Hard Knock Life” from “Annie” complete with props and choreography. According to Everett, her passion for theater grew from that day on; she participated in musicals throughout middle school and high school, where she said she found a serious program with a dedicated teacher.


Arts

Student Spotlight: Kelleen Moriarty ’19 reimagines dated theater

May 9, 2019 2:16am

Kelleen Moriarty ’19, the student director for the upcoming production of “The Glass Menagerie,” has been involved in theater since she was in middle school. According to Moriarty, when she first came to Dartmouth, she knew that she wanted to major in theater and eventually pursue it professionally, since theater was “the one thing” in her life she was “very sure” of. 


Arts

Review: Taylor Swift’s new single ‘ME!’ is uninspired but catchy

May 6, 2019 9:06pm

With the release of her new single “ME!” this past April 26, Taylor Swift has evolved once again. A bubbly and bright pop song, “ME!” marks Swift’s departure from the mood of her previous album, the inspired and aggressive “reputation,” and her persona’s transformation to the glaringly upbeat and pastel imagery of “ME!” 


Arts

Album Review: Cage The Elephant's "Social Cues" is unsatisfying

May 2, 2019 7:46pm

It’s been almost four years since Cage the Elephant released their Grammy-winning album “Tell Me I’m Pretty,” and in that time, frontman Matt Shultz suffered the shocks of a tumultuous life . He endured a divorce from his wife Juliette Buchs along with the suicides of two close friends , and that despair became the impetus for Cage’s fifth studio album, “Social Cues,” released on April 19. 


Arts

“Art, Artists, and the Museum” symposium at the Hood

May 2, 2019 7:40pm

Today, the Hood Museum of Art is holding a symposium entitled “Arts, Artists, and the Museum: a Conversation.” Considered the Hood’s second major re-opening event, it consists of discussions with a variety of artists who have work on display in the galleries, an open house and a reception in the evening.


Arts

Natives at the Museum: Past Imaginaries and Contemporary Realities

May 1, 2019 7:57pm

Museums originated from Western collectors displaying “artifacts” from other cultures. Indeed, many items in museum collections are there because they were donated by collectors of such “ethnic” artifacts. So, given this early practice of showcasing travels, conquest and wealth, what is the responsibility of the museum today? Do museums have an obligation to educate the public about other cultures and their history?


Arts

Review: ‘Minimalism’ convinces audiences to focus on happiness

April 29, 2019 8:08pm

At the beginning of this term, I noticed just how much stuff I had accumulated after several years of dorm life in a boarding school. I have used all of my closets and other storage spaces to the fullest, yet, I still have many books, jackets, random electronic devices and documents on the floor. Sometimes, I struggle to dig out the t-shirt I want to wear because my closet is literally full of clothes; other times I am tripped by the Amazon boxes on the ground or I cannot find the right cable among millions of cables all of which have become so intertwined that they may never be separated from each other. This is what a pair of filmmakers called the “Minimalists” refer to as “clutter.”


Arts

Review: cult-classic sci-fi film ‘Alien’ remains relevant 40 years later

April 29, 2019 8:06pm

Reaching its 40th anniversary this year, “Alien,” directed by Ridley Scott, is widely regarded as one of the most influential sci-fi/fantasy films of all times. The film’s symbolism, grand setting, relatable extraterrestrial horror and the metaphysical questions it raises all contribute to a complex and thrilling viewing experience. Forty years since its release, the movie’s profound message still echoes with human identity and remains relevant today. As a devout “Alien” fan, I will review “Alien,” the first movie of the namesake series, but I will also provide a brief guide on the correct sequential order in which to watch the iconic movie franchise. 


Arts

Review: ‘Avengers: Endgame’ delivers a satisfying conclusion

April 29, 2019 6:52pm

Avengers: Endgame” is one of those odd films that everyone wants to talk about, but, in a sense, no one does. Fans fear that critics will spoil the experience for them, and critics fear the wrath of these fans, resulting in a cycle that does its very best to curtail any actual conversation about the film or its content. Thus, while I will certainly strive to avoid spoilers throughout this review, I always want to talk about some of the thematic and narrative implications of the film. To paraphrase video essayist Dan Olson, if you don’t want spoilers for “Avengers: Endgame,” don’t go see “Avengers: Endgame” because it is wall to wall with spoilers for “Avengers: Endgame.”


Arts

Review: ‘Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’ finishes strong through reprises

April 25, 2019 6:14pm

The CW Network’s show, “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” has been my favorite TV show since I binged the first three seasons of it last term, which is also when I learned that the next season to my newfound favorite would be its last. My experiences with last seasons for personal favorites in television have not been great, so I was nervous and disappointed about the end to a TV gem that I had just discovered. Luckily, the fourth season of the show was yet another strong addition of a chapter in the protagonist’s journey of self-acceptance and learning to navigate personal relationships, while also fulfilling its role as a final season well by tying the story together in a satisfying conclusion. 


Arts

HBO’s ‘Game of Thrones’ begins its final season with a blast

April 22, 2019 9:06pm

Before winter break, I had never seen a single episode of “Game of Thrones,” let alone read one of George R.R. Martin’s novels. By the time break ended, I had seen almost the entire HBO fantasy series, not just because I was enrolled in the winter class, ENGL 53.6, “Game of Thrones: Reimagining Medieval History as an Allegory of the Present” with English and creative writing professor James Dobson, but because it’s the type of show that once you start, it’s near impossible to stop. Once I finished season one, I started season two. Before I knew it, I was one of the many eager fans anticipating the release of season eight.


Arts

Author Margaret Atwood delivers lecture on writing and politics

April 22, 2019 9:05pm

On April 18, Margaret Atwood, a novelist, poet and activist best known for her critically-acclaimed novel and subsequent Emmy award-winning Hulu TV remake “The Handmaid’s Tale,” gave a public lecture at the Spaulding Auditorium through the Dorsett Fellowship Lecture Series, a program that seeks to bring practitioners and scholars of ethics to campus. 


Arts

Film thoughts: everyone has a guilty pleasure film, and it's okay

April 22, 2019 9:46pm

Everyone loves bad films. We may pretend not to or try to justify this preference, but at the end of the day, we all have at least one guilty pleasure film. Of course, the very notion of a “bad film” is contentious because no method of film criticism has the capacity to be purely objective. That being said, I still contend that everyone has the tendency to love films that we personally deem to be “bad” but elicit a distinct sense of enjoyment in us nonetheless.   


Arts

Review: ‘Outer Peace’ expresses youth disillusion through music

April 18, 2019 6:17pm

This past January, Toro y Moi (also known as Chaz Bear) released his sixth album, “Outer Peace.” Inspired by the electronic dance music of Daft Punk and Wally Badarou’s synthpop, “Outer Peace” is a breezy 10 tracks, spanning just over 30 minutes. As a whole, the album is very easy to listen to — the tracks are generally composed of low-fi, low energy, yet upbeat beats and melodies — and none of them are longer than four minutes. On the surface, Toro y Moi has produced a fun, and at times quirky, album full of hits that can be played at a wide range of events, whether it be at a party that’s about to hit its peak or at a study table that needs a pick-me-up. A deeper dive into the album with closer listening, though, reveals that Toro y Moi has also subtly inputted his own little touches of tongue-in-cheek ironic flair and his sense of pessimistic disillusionment to which millennials and Gen Zers can definitely relate.