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The Dartmouth
May 23, 2024 | Latest Issue
The Dartmouth
News
News

Brewster's to close

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Only one year after their opening, two major Main Street retail stores will close. The two stores, Brewster's, a retail clothing store, and Eleazar's Museum Shop, a high-priced novelty shop, are in Hanover's best retail shopping space on South Main Street attached to the Hanover Inn. Eugene Kohn, who is a part owner and spokesman for the shops, said they are closing because of the region's difficult economic climate. Kohn and other officers of the Lang Retail Corporation, which owns both stores, spent the last two months unsuccessfully searching for more partners and additional capital. "The general economic condition in New Hampshire is just not healthy enough to attract the risk capital necessary to allow us to fund the slow start of these new retail stores," Kohn said. The stores are currently closed for inventory.


News

Kid, cops and jocks; Athletes and police officers entertain local youths

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While the band at Alpha Delta fraternity filled the air with music last Saturday, gusts of wind carried the smell of beer across the street where a much younger group of children were having a different kind of fun in and around Alumni Gym and Leverone Field House. Dartmouth athletes and local police officers volunteered to teach their skills to more than 500 local children at the first annual Dartmouth Sports Fun Day. The day was the culminating event of the 1993 Kids and Cops of the Upper Valley Program, run by five local police stations and the College's Athletic Department. The third through eighth graders spent three hours moving through 20 stations featuring 10 different sports, a talk on the value of wearing seat belts and a display of police cruisers in the Leverone parking lot. Many of the local youngsters said exploring the police cruisers was their favorite part of the day.


News

Jewish identity analyzed

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Visiting professor and German-Israeli scholar Michael Wolffsohn gave his historical interpretation of the Holocaust and German and Jewish identities last night to a standing room only audience in 3 Rockefeller. His speech, entitled "The Holocaust, Germany and Jewish Identity" was the College's third annual Walter Picard Lecture. Wolffsohn, born in Tel Aviv, grew up in Germany with dual Israeli and German citizenship.


News

Housing notification delayed

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Office of Residential Life administrators said yesterday that Fall term cluster assignments will be mailed to students May 31, more than two weeks later than the office originally planned. The late mailing means students will have only eight days during reading period and final examinations to pick a room and roommates. Final hall and room assignments will not be mailed until Summer term, said Lynn Rosenblum, who masterminds the housing process. A brochure mailed to students when they filled out the first part of the housing application stated, "By May 15, we will notify all on-time applicants." But Rosenblum said ORL was only "shooting for the May 15 deadline.


News

College plans cuts to employee benefits

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The College's top two financial officers yesterday presented academic department heads with a plan to avoid a projected budget deficit by cutting the benefits packages given to all College employees.


News

Committee: Switch athletics to Division III

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Academic department chairs yesterday discussed a report that recommends moving Dartmouth athletic teams from National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I to Division III classification. The report, issued a year ago by the Committee on Admissions and Financial Aid was presented at a meeting of the Committee of Chairs by Anthropology Professor Hoyt Alverson, who chairs the admissions and financial aid committee; Bob Ceplikas, an assistant to the Athletic Director and Dean of Admissions Karl Furstenburg . The report examined the implications of Division I recruiting on the College's budget and on the admissions process. Furstenberg said the report recommended switching to Division III or reforming athletic recruitment regulations within the Ivy League.


News

Thornburg calls for reforms within U.N.

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Former U.S. Attorney General Richard Thornburgh spoke on the need for personnel and financial reform within the United Nations last night before a large audience in Hinman Forum. Thornburgh, who also served as U.N.



News

English department adds course to major

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The English department will add requirements to its major starting with the Class of 1996, including an eleventh course chosen from a different department and a final culminating project. The department will also increase the number of courses required for an honors major from 10 to 13 and require that all honors majors write a senior thesis. "The English major felt kind of light to us," said Professor David Wykes, vice-chair of the department and chair of the Committee on Departmental Curriculum (CDC). "English majors were doing less work to get the major than a student at Dartmouth should. "It is unusual to have a 10-course major with no prerequisites," he said. Currently, English majors are required to take a course in each of four period groups (Medieval or Renaissance, 17th and 18th Centuries, 19th Century, 20th Century), a course examining a single author and five additional courses. In the past, students have petitioned the CDC to substitute courses from outside the department for credit on their major cards, Wykes said. "The effect of the change is that people will still take the outside course, but they will be forced to take more courses in the English department," Wykes said. Members of the Class of 1996 will have to satisfy the 10 existing requirements and then take an additional course in a related discipline outside the English department.



News

1,064 enroll in '97 class

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The 1,064 students who plan to enroll as members of the Class of 1997 form "the strongest academic profile that Dartmouth has ever had," according to Dean of Admissions Karl Furstenberg. Furstenberg attributed the incoming class' strength to the increase in the total number of applications received this year.



News

Grad students picked to live in dorms

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The Office of Residential Life has selected five graduate students ranging in age from 23 to 30 years old to live in different undergraduate dormitories next year. The five were selected as part of a two-year pilot program called Graduate Students-in-Residence.


News

Barksdale resigns as next AAm leader

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Amiri Barksdale '96 resigned as president-elect of the Afro-American society Thursday at a special executive board meeting. The AAm, the College's black students' organization, typically holds general meetings on Thursday, but cancelled last week's meeting to discuss Barksdale's future. Will Griffin '94, an executive board member, said the executive board decided to have another election to determine its next president. Barksdale could not be reached for comment. Zola Mashariki '94, the only candidate who ran against Barksdale in the AAm's winter election, would not say if she would run again. Barksdale, elected Winter term, first indicated that he might resign at an AAm executive board meeting last Sunday.


News

Weekend conference examines motherhood

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A conference on motherhood hosted by the College this weekend began Friday evening with a panel discussion on the role of motherhood in feminist politics. The three-day conference called "Redefining Motherhood: Mothers, Politics and Social Change in the 20th Century" involved women speakers from across the country and around the world. This opening panel discussion, entitled "Theorizing Radical Motherhood," sought to examine "how motherhood has affected our ability to act collectively in a wide range of social contexts," according Dartmouth English and Women's Studies Professor Ivy Schweitzer, who moderated the panel. In a speech called "Some Thoughts on the Uneasy Relationship of Feminism and Motherhood," French Professor Marianne Hirsch said, "The conference places mothers in the context of radical politics." "We live in a culture that romanticizes motherhood and idealizes children," Hirsch said.


News

New honor society inducts 142 students

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A new honor society last week inducted 142 students in an Alumni Hall ceremony. The group, called the Golden Key Honor Society, is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors who have a minimum 3.5 grade point average. Golden Key, a national organization represented at 182 schools, is targeting Ivy League institutions beginning with Dartmouth as sites for new chapters, according to Brenda Edison, the chapter president here. Members pay a $45 fee which contributes to scholarships, conventions, a publication called Concepts and the salaries of the national organization workers who start chapters and work through the red tape. But some students who were invited to join the group said the $45 membership fee was too burdensome. "After reading the literature, it didn't seem worthwhile to pay $45 for a society that was essentially honorary in nature," said Steve Fagell '95 who was asked to join but refused. "I questioned what the student gets out of it," he said.


News

Campus po' kept busy

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Hanover Police made only two arrests on campus over the Green Key party weekend, but College Safety and Security officers were kept busy with other minor incidents. Proctor Robert McEwen said it was a "very active Green Key Weekend" with more than the usual litany of noise complaints and inebriates. Two non-Dartmouth students were arrested Thursday for underage drinking and for possession of marijuana, Hanover Police said.