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Review: “It Ends With Us” is heart-wrenching in the best way possible

(04/07/22 6:00am)

I felt nervous buying BookTok’s most popular book, “It Ends With Us,” by Colleen Hoover. I worried that how I felt about  this book would sway my future judgments on other books I find through TikTok. I was even more nervous writing a review for it, as, for me, “It Ends With Us” raised the bar for not only all other new adult fiction books, but fiction books across the board. I now understand why there is a cult following for this book and the characters in it. 


Big Time Rush capitalizes on nostalgia with their return

(04/05/22 6:05am)

Big Time Rush is back, riding the wave of nostalgia sweeping over Gen Z. The announcement and timing of Big Time Rush’s official comeback on Twitter in July 2021 couldn’t have been more perfect: In a pessimistic post-pandemic world, Gen Z has found optimism in many of their favorite childhood TV shows, owing largely to platforms like TikTok and YouTube to further spread their obsession. 


Student Spotlight: Singer-Songwriter Christian Beck ’24 goes to Hollywood on ‘American Idol’

(04/05/22 6:00am)

What began as a way to pass the time and process his emotions quickly became a passion for Christian Beck ’24, who began singing and songwriting his senior year of high school during the initial COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. In the fall of 2021, he was scouted via TikTok to audition for “American Idol.” 


The SITI Company celebrates the collaborative nature of theater at the Hopkins Center

(04/05/22 6:02am)

On March 31 and April 1, the SITI Company, a New York-based theater company, performed a  revival of their 1993 performance “The Medium” at the Hopkins Center for the Arts. Directed by Anne Bogart, co-artistic director of the SITI Company and a professor at Columbia University, “The Medium” explores the media's influence on perception and identity, combining various styles of dance and expression to create a distinctive show that highlights the importance of movement and sound in creation. 


The 2022 Oscars fashion blurs the lines of masculinity and femininity

(03/31/22 6:05am)

Hundreds of celebrities walked the red carpet at the 94th annual Academy Awards on Sunday for the first relatively normal version of the award ceremony since the outbreak of COVID-19. Now more than ever, it seemed like the artists felt freer to express themselves: They were unapologetic in dressing in unique and interesting ways, even blurring the lines of masculinity and femininity. The Oscars highlighted the ambiguity and freedom of fashion under the watchful eye of the public, reflecting a modern acceptance of clothing’s gender fluidity. From fresh takes on the classic “awards ceremony” dress to the experimental and risky, this year’s best dressed at the Oscars were truly some to remember.


Review: Charli XCX’s ‘Crash’ Lacks Usual Experimental Character

(03/31/22 6:00am)

After her first experiment with hyperpop in 2016 with the EP “Vroom Vroom,” Charli XCX has been on the cutting edge of new sounds in popular music. Albums like “Charli” (my favorite album of 2019) and 2020’s “How I’m Feeling Now” have been instrumental in bringing the bubblegum bass sound — pioneered by her late collaborator SOPHIE and British music label PC Music — to the mainstream. However, as she releases the final album of her record deal with Atlantic, Charli XCX is trying something new: By her own admission, she’s selling out.


Review: ‘Turning Red’ Turns Coming-of-Age on Its Head, and It’s About Time

(03/29/22 6:00am)

Released to Disney+ on March 11, “Turning Red” took the world by storm. Directed by Domee Shi, the movie follows 13-year-old Meilin “Mei” Lee (Rosalie Chiang) after she wakes and discovers that when she experiences strong emotions, she transforms into a giant red panda, a respected guardian animal in her family’s history. This generational curse and blessing is passed down to every daughter when they come of age; however, it can be permanently trapped in a talisman with a ritual performed during a Red Moon. As Mei struggles to control her new and changing body, she is forced to confront her relationship with herself, her friends and most importantly, her mother.


Essential Dartmouth Playlists

(03/08/22 7:00am)

As we reflect on our last night of production as the 178th Directorate’s Arts editors, we would like to share something meaningful and expressive. We have truly enjoyed writing and editing pieces about the arts on campus and beyond, as this creative sphere allows for special connections between peoples. Art, theater, music, movies and books serve to foster a shared humanity, and we hope that our articles over the past year have reflected this valuable sentiment to the Dartmouth and Upper Valley communities. So, in our last piece as Arts editors, we use music to highlight shared Dartmouth traditions. We hope you enjoy these playlists.


Review: Season Two of ‘Euphoria’ Excels with Phenomenal Acting, Cinematography and Music

(03/03/22 7:00am)

“Euphoria” seduces its viewers with an absurd portrayal of high school. There is something intoxicating about watching these characters ruin their lives, a total inability to look away as their world burns around them while you snack on the couch. Episodes fluctuate between campy teen drama and somber character explorations, each desperately trying to raise the stakes by increasing shock with explicit content. 




Review: ‘Moonfall’ Offers a Ridiculously Fun Time

(02/24/22 7:05am)

Let’s get one thing straight: “Moonfall” is a ridiculous movie. From poster promotions featuring various angles of a gigantic moon, to its absolutely wild explanation of what the moon “really is,” to its effective, self-descriptive title, “Moonfall” is a showcase of the dramatic excess that characterizes apocalyptic movies. The film demonstrates what happens when disaster director extraordinaire Roland Emmerich has fun. 


Students get in touch with the art scene at Dartmouth in Hood After 5 event

(02/22/22 7:05am)

Hood After 5, an event marketed as “for students, by students,” took place Friday, Feb. 18 in the Hood Museum of Art. Museum Club members spotlighted works from the “This Land: American Engagement with the Natural World” exhibition, set up art-making activity stations and provided live entertainment for student attendees. 


‘RENT’ explores community during an epidemic

(02/22/22 7:00am)

The Dartmouth theater department’s MainStage production for the winter term, the rock musical “RENT,” opened on Feb. 18, marking the first time that the show has been produced at Dartmouth. The two-act musical, written and composed by Jonathan Larson, follows a group of impoverished Bohemian artists in their twenties living in the 1980s amid the AIDS epidemic in New York. 


Annual Orozco lecture explores immigration and agrarian politics

(02/22/22 7:03am)

On Thursday, Feb. 17, The Manton Foundation’s annual lecture on “The Epic of American Civilization” murals by José Clemente Orozco featured Luis Vargas Santiago, a Mexican art historian and curator. Santiago’s talk in the Hood Museum of Art’s Gilman Auditorium examined how Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata has been depicted in Orozco’s work and in Mexican history. 



Dartmouth College Wind Ensemble concert to feature student, community performers

(02/18/22 7:00am)

This Saturday at 7:30 p.m., the Hopkins Center for the Arts will host the Dartmouth College Wind Ensemble in Spaulding Auditorium as they perform a variety of pieces from the 2020 Dartmouth Wind Ensemble Composition Competition. Among this musical selection will be the world premiere of two compositions: “Journeys III,” composed by Quinn Mason, and “Cerro y Nube,” composed by Eduardo Aguilar. The performance was arranged by Wind Ensemble Director Brian Messier and features both student performers and musicians from the Upper Valley community.  


Anaïs Mitchell and Bonny Light Horseman bring folk sounds and whimsical storytelling to the Hopkins Center

(02/15/22 7:05am)

Anaïs Mitchell — along with band partners Josh Kaufman and Eric Johnson, the three of whom make up Bonny Light Horseman — will perform today at 8 p.m. in Spaulding Auditorium at the Hopkins Center for the Arts. Mitchell will kick off the show playing original songs from her past albums and hit musical, “Hadestown,” and midway through the performance, she will be joined by Kaufman and Johnson, according to Hop program manager Karen Henderson. 


Review: ‘Red Rocket’ Brilliantly Explores the Cost of Desire

(02/15/22 7:00am)

This past Friday, the Hopkins Center for the Arts screened “Red Rocket” for a nearly full audience of students and community members. The celebrated film studio behind the movie, A24, released the dark comedy in December 2021, which was directed by Sean Baker (best known for his previous film, The Florida Project). Set in a Texan town on the Gulf Coast, “Red Rocket” centers on aging former porn star Mikey Saber (Simon Rex) as he returns to his hometown, Texas City. Desperate and penniless, he arrives at the house of his ex-wife, Lexi (Bree Elrod), and despite some hesitation, she eventually lets him stay and soon rekindles their romance. Mikey settles into a rhythm in Texas City — running a weed business out of a local donut shop, biking around the town and driving to strip clubs with his awkward younger neighbor, Lonnie (Ethan Darbone).





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