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Review: ‘Book Lovers’ is enemies to lovers without lovers or enemies

(07/01/22 5:00am)

There are many ways to begin a love story. Don’t believe me? Just walk into any bookstore’s romance section. You will stumble across microgenres like friends to lovers, co-workers to lovers, childhood neighbors to lovers, sister-in-law to lovers (hello Bridgerton season two!), strangers to lovers, fake lovers to lovers, fake lovers to lovers but for young adults — the list goes on. But — in accordance with the truism that the opposite of love is not hate, but rather indifference — the crown jewel plot line of contemporary romance is enemies to lovers. While I don’t personally get it — call me old fashioned but I’d rather my significant other like me instead of abhor me (been there done that!) — enemies to lovers is a long time favorite. From “Pride and Prejudice” to “When Harry Met Sally,” as a society, we cannot  get enough of weirdly charged meet-cutes and declarations of hatred that turn into passionate kisses. I mean, anyone with a soul can admit that Elizabeth telling Darcy that he is the last man on Earth she could ever marry (while he stares longingly at her in the pouring rain) is damn good cinema. Who among us can forget Julia Stiles’s character in “Ten Things I Hate About You” reading a poem addressed to her enemy, played by Heath Ledger, that ends with “But mostly I hate the way I don’t hate you, not even close, not even a little bit, not even at all.” No one, that’s who. Enemies to lovers is all about the tension! The unspoken feelings! The miscommunication! The passion! The way they don’t hate each other, not even at all! The crux of enemies to lovers is a simple reversal of expectations. It really doesn’t take much. But Emily Henry makes that easy equation look pretty difficult in her third novel “Book Lovers.” 


Q&A With Green Key Performer Parrotfish

(06/02/22 6:00am)

Parrotfish, a Tampa, Florida based band, made up of members Conor Lynch (vocals), Joe Cadrecha (guitar), Trace Chiappe (drums) and Matty Rodrigo (bass), recently performed for Dartmouth students at Phi Delta Alpha fraternity’s block party. The band kicked off the Green Key weekend with an electric performance that drew a massive crowd and packed Webster Avenue. The Dartmouth sat down with Parrotfish to discuss their history as a band, their Dartmouth performance and their many plans for the future. 


​​Review: Kendrick Lamar delivers a more inward focus with his new album

(07/01/22 5:05am)

On his last three albums, Kendrick Lamar has explored a range of lofty topics. On “Good Kid, m.A.A.d City” (2012), he used his experience as a teenager in Compton, CA., to make a general statement about growing up in impoverished urban areas. In “To Pimp a Butterfly” (2015), Lamar wrote about the experience of black people in America more broadly. In “DAMN.” (2017), Lamar wrote about emotions in a more abstract way; he was still presenting himself as a larger-than-life figure, one who many listeners treat as a role model. But now, after a five year wait, Kendrick finally makes an attempt to present himself only as a human being with faults and vulnerabilities on his new album “Mr. Morale and the Big Steppers.”


Brancusi ‘Bird in Space’ Captures Attention in the Hood’s Front Window

(05/31/22 6:00am)

When John Stomberg was the chief curator at the Williams College Museum of Art, the museum’s board told him he was crazy for inquiring about obtaining a work by Romanian artist Constantin Brancusi, who is considered one of the most influential sculptors of the 20th century, for the museum’s collection. Now, as director of the Hood Museum of Art, Stomberg can look back on the encounter as a fond precursor to what he has achieved today.


“Harry’s House” is an intimate diversion from Styles’ previous work

(05/26/22 6:05am)

Driving back from New York on the morning of the album’s release, “Harry’s House” was the soundtrack of my return to campus. With nothing but long highways and sleeping passengers — coupled with Waze occasionally interrupting the soft crooning of Harry Styles — I was able to give this album the attention it deserved, which is what has made me appreciate its many nuances and subtleties so much.


Q&A with photographer and filmmaker Hollye Swinehart ’18

(05/26/22 6:00am)

During her time at Dartmouth, Hollye Swinehart ’18 discovered her love for art and photography at the Hopkins Center for the Arts. Now, Swinehart is preparing to film her senior thesis for her Masters in the Arts at the London Film School, a short film called “Cotton Something.” Swinehart is set to graduate in December and submit her film to festivals such as the Telluride Film Festival and Sundance Film Festival. The Dartmouth sat down with Swinehart to discuss her journey from photography to filmmaking and her advice for Dartmouth students on pursuing a career in the arts. 






Review: ‘Everything Everywhere All at Once’ does everything right

(05/19/22 6:04am)

Anyone who considers themselves a fan of film has, at some point, become familiar with a sort of dreary stagnation with their passion for the medium. After so many movies and so many bags of popcorn, you find yourself growing dreadfully numb to an art form that once inspired and thrilled you like no other. For a while, I felt this numbness, and I even thought it might kill my love for film entirely. It wasn’t until I saw the wonderfully inventive “Everything Everywhere All at Once” — the latest from writer-directors Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert — that I rediscovered, through the most emotionally uplifting cinematic experience I’ve ever had, my profound love for the screen. Through an original and extremely creative story that was expertly directed, acted and scored, “Everything Everywhere All at Once” becomes something far greater than the sum of its many parts. For me, it became one of my favorite films of all time.





Review: Rina Sawayama’s Boston performance inspires audience to dance and cry

(05/10/22 6:00am)

When the lights dimmed in the Boston Royale, the crowd immediately went silent. A figure walked out from stage right, dressed in a red suit and a red coat with exaggerated shoulder pads. As Rina Sawayama struck her starting pose and the opening chords of “Dynasty” began to play, the crowd erupted in cheers.


Review: “Pachinko” brilliantly blurs the lines between past and present

(05/05/22 6:00am)

On April 29, Apple TV+ aired the final episode of “Pachinko,” an eight-episode television drama based on the bestselling novel of the same name by Min-Jin Lee. The series was such a success that, on the same day the final episode aired, Apple announced the renewal of “Pachinko” for a second season — a well-deserved achievement. 


The House of Lewan brings drag to Dartmouth

(05/05/22 6:05am)

The House of Lewan, Dartmouth’s first recognized drag club, hosts free, all-inclusive drag workshops and will be performing at the upcoming Transform event on Friday, May 6th at 8 p.m. in Kemeny Courtyard. Transform, one of Dartmouth’s traditional PRIDE celebrations, will feature drag performances from students and Adore Delano, a drag icon and season six finalist on “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” 


Student Spotlight: Eduardo Hernandez ’22's short film inspired by Dartmouth filmmaking community

(05/03/22 6:00am)

Film major Eduardo Hernandez ’22 started out behind the camera in middle school, delivering morning announcements and shooting sketches about the lunch menu. He found the experience “engrossing” — now, he is producing and directing a short film for his senior thesis titled “I Hope You Don’t Mind What I Put Down In Words.” To be completed by the end of spring, the short film focuses on the exhilarating early stages of love and features Annabel Everett ’25 and Jack Heaphy ’24. 


Trends: How Olivia Rodrigo has gained her immense success

(04/28/22 6:05am)

At the beginning of 2021, Olivia Rodrigo skyrocketed into fame. Her publicity and marketing have sparked a new kind of popularity amongst not only the youth, but also young adults who resonate with her genuine storytelling. Rodrigo’s fame and acknowledgement on social media platforms, such as TikTok, illustrate the extent to which a generation living through a pandemic was hungry for content and musical inspiration. She has also taken on a nostalgic aesthetic, as she wears clothing reminiscent of the early 2000s, includes trendy filmmaking tactics in her music videos and weaves angsty rock elements within her songs. 




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