Search Results


Use the fields below to perform an advanced search of The Dartmouth 's archives. This will return articles, images, and multimedia relevant to your query.




1000 items found for your search. If no results were found please broaden your search.



Verbum Ultimum: Break the Mold

(15 hours ago)

Last Friday, in a campus-wide email, Interim Dean of the College Scott Brown announced the discovery of significant mold growth in the Andres and Zimmerman residence halls, informing the community that students with a “health sensitivity” to mold  had been given the option to relocate to temporary housing, first in the Boss Tennis Center and, starting Sunday, in a “limited number of hotel rooms in the area.” The email also noted that mold “remediation” efforts, which include the vacuuming of interior surfaces of each HVAC unit with a high-efficiency particulate vacuum and the installation of additional filtration, have already begun in Andres and Zimmerman and that additional inspections will occur in other residential buildings throughout the next few weeks. In addition, the College announced that, moving forward, it will expand its mold protocols to include regular checks of air handling units in all Dartmouth buildings.




2020 Census data shows increased population and racial diversity in Upper Valley towns

(13 hours ago)

Data from the 2020 Census, released in August 2021, showed a marked increase in New Hampshire’s population — including the towns of Hanover and Lebanon. Since the last census conducted in 2010, Hanover’s population has increased by 5.4% andLebanon’s has increased by 8.6%. 



Regional pharmacies and hospitals begin administering Pfizer-BioNTech booster shots

(13 hours ago)

On Sept. 24 — the same day that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a set of recommendations outlining who would be eligible for an additional dose of a COVID-19 vaccine — major national pharmacy chains, such as CVS Pharmacy, began rolling out Pfizer-BioNTech booster shots for those on the CDC’s list. Other healthcare facilities, including Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, have been slower to administer shots.




Allen: Share the Wealth

(10/14/21 8:05am)

On Monday, Dartmouth announced that its endowment — the pool of money generated from donors and investments and used in part to finance the College’s operations — grew to $8.5 billion at the end of fiscal year 2021, a striking 46.5% increase from the previous fiscal year. When Dartmouth announced this growth, it also announced several ways it would use the endowment to support the student body, such as increasing financial aid to undergraduates, offering a $1,000 bonus to certain graduate students and raising the student minimum wage from $7.75 an hour to $11.50 an hour — a change College spokesperson Diana Lawrence estimated would impact around 1,000 student workers.



Five Good Samaritan calls, no arrests at Homecoming 2021

(10/14/21 9:10am)

This weekend, Dartmouth’s Homecoming festivities returned to the Green for the first time since 2019, with both the Classes of 2024 and 2025 sharing in this year’s bonfire celebrations. While this year’s celebration saw a slight uptick in Good Samaritan calls from last homecoming — five compared to three in 2019 —  no students were arrested, according to Hanover police chief Charlie Dennis.  




Indigenous ceramic and textile artist Anita Fields speaks to students virtually

(10/14/21 6:00am)

On Oct. 13, clay and textile artist Anita Fields participated in a live conversation hosted by the Hood Museum of Art curator of Indigenous art Jami Powell. The conversation focused on Fields’ practice as well as her work, “So Many Ways to Be Human,” which is part of the exhibit “Form and Relation: Contemporary Native Ceramics” that runs from January 2021 to July 2022. Six Indigenous artists are included in this exhibit, which focuses on themes such as community, land, gender and responsibility. Dartmouth ceramics studio director and instructor Jennifer Swanson facilitated the talk. 


Student Assembly launches Calm App, a mental health pilot program

(10/14/21 9:00am)

On Oct. 5, Student Assembly’s mental health committee announced its Calm app pilot program in a campus-wide email. Beginning on Oct. 11, the pilot program gave 100 randomly-selected students a free one-year subscription to Calm, an app that, according to the email, helps users decrease anxiety and improve sleep through its guided meditations and music library. According to the application’s website, Calm’s resources are “evidence-based” and informed by “rigorous scientific research” that includes 12 research publications. 


On the Topic of Tenure

(10/13/21 6:11am)

During course election this fall, I was entirely preoccupied with figuring out how the timetable worked and deciding whether I truly wanted to take Spanish at 7:45 in the morning. The farthest thing from my thoughts was whether the professors who would be teaching me had tenure or not, but for those enmeshed in academia, standing for tenure is often one of the most pivotal moments in their careers. 


Much Ado About Greek Life

(10/13/21 6:25am)

On my official Dartmouth tour, there seemed to be an odd trend: Some beautiful, classical buildings (or houses, I’d almost immediately learn) were taboos my tour guide danced around — “Here is Foco, short for Food Court! We sure love slang here at Dartmouth! Kindly ignore that building with fancy ancient letters!” Yes, the Dartmouth administration — and, by extension, Dartmouth tour guides — seemed to operate with a collective hushed embarrassment regarding not just the existence, but the dominance of Greek life on campus. For an institution that comprises such a massive part of student life, should Greek life not be a selling point for admissions’ advertising strategies?


Editors' Note

(10/13/21 6:00am)

This past week has marked many firsts, and also many lasts. It was the first time that the ’24s and ’25s participated in the cult-like tradition of the Homecoming bonfire and felt the warmth of its extraordinary flames. For many ’24s, it was their first weekend of being affiliated with Greek organizations. It was also the first time that the many members of the classes of ’21 and ’20 came back to campus post-graduation. And for the ’22s, this weekend was the first of many lasts — our last bonfire as undergraduates. It’s not always easy for these important moments to sink in. But even if we aren’t able to appreciate them in the moment, we always have the memories to look back on. 


The Future of Capitalism, From the Classroom

(10/13/21 6:15am)

“Pretty much any contemporary problem is going to be better understood in a multidisciplinary context,” said public policy professor Charlie Wheelan, one of three professors co-teaching GOVT 68, “The Future of Capitalism” this term. The course is taught by professors of three different academic specialties — government, economics and public policy — and takes advantage of its unique teaching set-up to explore the pros and cons of capitalism through the lens of multiple disciplines.


21F, Across the Pond

(10/13/21 6:20am)

As traditions are restored, friendships are rekindled and in-person classes are reinstated, the beginning of 21F marks Dartmouth’s return to a semi-normal campus. This historically significant term has afforded unique opportunities for connecting — and reconnecting — to Dartmouth’s community, not only for Dartmouth’s freshman but for all returning students. 




Advertise your student group in The Dartmouth for free!