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‘The Watchful Eye’ premieres on Freeform, Hulu

(01/30/23 7:00am)

Freeform’s upcoming mystery-thriller series, “The Watchful Eye,” premieres tonight at 9 p.m. on Freeform, and will be available for streaming on Hulu on Jan. 11. Created by Julie Durk, the female-led show hopes to offer a new perspective on the contemporary mystery thriller genre.   The Dartmouth was invited to a virtual press junket to interview executive producer Emily Fox as well as some of the show’s cast ahead of the premier.


Review: ‘M3GAN’ attempts to tackle the intricacies of human relationships

(01/30/23 7:10am)

The new movie “M3GAN,” which was released on Jan. 6, 2023, assembles the (un)holy trinity from horror film hell. We have producers James Wan, who directed “The Conjuring” franchise, and Blumhouse Productions’ Jason Blum in addition to “Housebound” director Gerard Johnstone, all working together to write about an eerie doll. Working off a screenplay from American Horror Story screenwriter Akela Cooper, M3GAN seems to be striking horror celluloid gold. So far, so scary.


‘Constructing the Ideal Soldier‘ questions gender and patriotism

(01/27/23 7:05am)

On Jan. 25, the Hood Museum of Art debuted its 110th “A Space for Dialogue” exhibition, titled “Constructing the Ideal Soldier.” Nathan Savo ’24, a Class of 1954 curatorial intern at the Hood, was the primary curator for the exhibition, which examines art from Mexico and the United States during the first half of the 20th century. The exhibition encourages viewers to consider the ways in which different conventions of gender and patriotism were either upheld or challenged when depicting service members in art.



Deep Cuts: Three Hidden Movies to watch in Drama

(01/23/23 7:00am)

The year is 2007 and I am five years old, standing in a Blockbuster. My dad says I can pick out any movie I want, and I choose the original “Nosferatu” and an unmemorable B horror movie. When I try to fall asleep after our amateur double feature, I can’t. For the first and last time, I am truly frightened by a movie, so scared that I don't sleep the entire night. I consider this a watershed moment in my life — the first time a film evoked any emotion in me.  


Trends: The aesthetic of female sadness has returned once again

(01/23/23 7:15am)

Social media’s obsession with microtrends has created a revolving door of popular aesthetics — “e-girl” became “cottage-core” which evolved to “dark academia” and has recently transformed into “ballet-core.” A scroll through TikTok in the last few months reveals the increasing popularity of the television show “Fleabag,” books from Sally Rooney and music from Phoebe Bridgers. Although not explicitly named, all of these aspects and obsessions point to a larger trend: the revival of the aesthetic of being a sad teenage girl.



Namwali Serpell gives reading of elegiac novel at Sanborn

(01/20/23 7:10am)

Namwali Serpell, born in Lusaka, Zambia and currently living in New York, is a widely acclaimed author and professor at Harvard University. Her latest book, “The Furrows: An Elegy,” was named one of the 10 Best Books of 2022 by the New York Times and one of former president Barack Obama’s favorite books of 2022. On Jan. 18, Serpell read excerpts from her new novel and engaged in a Q&A session at Sanborn Library. 


Sex, Drugs and Hollywood: Chazelle’s ‘Babylon’ is a Beautiful Disaster

(01/20/23 7:05am)

On Dec. 23, 2022, Damien Chazelle, the director of “La La Land,” released “Babylon.” The nearly three-hour film has one indisputable quality: an ability to spur a fierce response, good or bad, from all its viewers. Slate deems “Babylon” a “defecating elephant of a movie,” while BBC instead describes it as a “cinematic marvel.” 




Programming Board Presents: A Night of Comedy with Michael Longfellow

(01/13/23 7:05am)

As a new cast member of Saturday Night Live, Michael Longfellow has recently gained recognition for performing in skits alongside veteran comedians like Cecily Strong and Kenan Thompson on the late-night comedy show. On Friday, Jan. 13 at 9 p.m., Longfellow will take the stage as a solo act to perform stand-up comedy at Dartmouth. Organized by the Programming Board, the show will take place at Common Ground in the Collis Center and is free of charge for all members of the College. 


Matthew Libby’s ‘Sisters’ explores the connections between humans and technology

(01/09/23 7:05am)

Matthew Libby’s “Sisters” is a story about family dynamics told by two sisters, Matilda played by Jihan Haddad and Greta played by Madeleine Barker. However, Greta is not human, but, instead, artificial intelligence. The story follows Matilda’s life, development and coming of age, while simultaneously, we see Greta’s development as a computer through her interaction with her sister. The play explores how the paths of the sisters intersect, eventually diverge and reach resolution in becoming one again.



Before the Curtain: Arts on Campus Week 2

(01/06/23 7:00am)

Since fall term ended in November, two new exhibits have opened at the Hood Museum of Art. The “Historical Imagery” collection, which opened on Dec. 17, features art that explores U.S. history — including an unfinished study of Emanuel Leutze’s “Washington Crossing the Delaware.”. On Jan. 4, an exhibit featuring the work of Margaret Bourke-White opened highlighting her images from World War II and Life Magazine. 


Review: ‘The Satanic Verses’ continues to provoke controversy and violence

(11/14/22 7:00am)

On Aug. 12, 2022, world renowned Indian-British-American author Salman Rushdie was stabbed repeatedly in an assassination attempt at a conference in New York. He was slated to present his thoughts on freedom of speech as an exiled author in America. He was initially exiled from Iran and targeted due to his depiction of the Prophet Muhammed in his book “The Satanic Verses,” which was released in 1988. Growing up in a liberal Muslim family, Rushdie now firmly considers himself to be an atheist — a conversion which is not taken lightly in the Islamic faith. 


Review: ‘Amsterdam’ shows the importance of community in the midst of uncertainty

(11/14/22 7:05am)

David O. Russell’s latest film, “Amsterdam,” is — at its core — a historical comedy and conspiracy thriller that dives into the power of friendship and loyalty. Set primarily in 1930s New York against a backdrop of social and racial inequality, the film touches on issues of post-traumatic stress disorder, white supremacy and the rise of American fascism. Though the overarching theme is a comforting message of the value or relationships in uncertain times, this is lost due to the film’s poor pacing and timeline which is difficult to follow. 



Q&A with pastry chef Claire Saffitz

(11/11/22 7:00am)

A recipe developer, New York Times Cooking contributor and video host, Claire Saffitz is not just any pastry chef. After reaching internet stardom through Bon Appétit’s “Gourmet Makes” YouTube series, Saffitz started her own channel, “Dessert Person,” to reach home bakers with approachable recipes. Her latest cookbook “What’s for Dessert” comes out this week, and Saffitz visited Norwich for a book event on Nov. 10. The Dartmouth sat down with Saffitz to discuss her newest project, careers in food media and baking in a dorm kitchen.


Review: ‘It Starts With Us’ takes readers through the pain of new beginnings

(11/07/22 8:00am)

“It Starts With Us” is Colleen Hoover’s sequel to her best-selling novel and BookTok sensation, “It Ends With Us.” The sequel begins directly after “It Ends With Us” and brings the reader through the intricacies of life after divorce and domestic abuse. “It Starts With Us” is a lighter read than its predecessor,  allowing the reader to experience Atlas and Lily’s relationship as they navigate divorce, found family and starting a new life after abuse. In many ways, Hoover presents a “second-chance” romance that alternates between Atlas’s and Lily’s points of views. “It Ends With Us” must be read first in order to fully understand the magnitude of some of the trivial events in “It Starts With Us.”




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