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2021 Music in Review: The 10 Best Albums of the Year

(11/16/21 7:05am)

After the strange, pandemic-dominated year of music that was 2020, 2021 felt like a return to normalcy for the music industry. Albums that had been postponed due to COVID were released, major artists like Kanye West and Drake dropped new albums and many albums devised during the lockdowns of the previous year saw artists exploring new directions. One notable musical event of the year that will not be included on this list was Taylor Swift’s re-releases of her older albums as “Taylor’s Version”; because none of that music was written in 2021, it will not be included on this list. Otherwise, here are the ten best albums released in 2021.


Hood Museum conversation with artist Julie Mehretu explores the intersection of art and science

(11/16/21 7:00am)

On Nov. 12, the Hood Museum of Art hosted a conversation between artist Julie Mehretu, Museum of Modern Art curator Ugochukwu-Smooth Nzewi and physics professor Marcelo Gleiser as part of the Dr. Allen W. Root Contemporary Art Distinguished Lectureship. Led by Nzewi, the conversation spanned a variety of topics, from their shared experience as immigrants who lived under military dictatorships to the relationship between art and science and the tension between the known and unknown, both in physics and in art. 


Coast Jazz Orchestra’s final show of the term to feature Bill Lowe, ensemble

(11/11/21 7:00am)

The Coast Jazz Orchestra will hold their third concert of the term today at 9 p.m. at Collis Common Ground. Jazz musician Bill Lowe and his ensemble, the Signifyin’ Natives, will join the student band. Lowe has played with avant-garde musicians such as Henry Threadgill and Muhal Richard Abrams, but has also collaborated with straight-ahead jazz musicians like Frank Foster and Thad Jones.




‘Poor Clare’ shines light on the complications of diversity in theater

(11/09/21 7:10am)

Diversity in theater has long been a topic of controversy, confusion and complications — and the Dartmouth theater department is no exception. As a college, Dartmouth has come a long way in terms of diversity, but — as the recent staged reading of the play “Poor Clare” demonstrates — what diversity looks like and how to achieve it is no simple task. 


Green To Go: Carpenter and Main serves Vermont on a plate

(11/09/21 7:00am)

This past weekend, I crossed the Connecticut River and visited the town of Norwich. A friend told me about a great restaurant there called Carpenter and Main. The fact that Bruce MacLeod, chef and owner of the restaurant, graduated from Dartmouth in 1984 piqued my interest, so I eagerly called the restaurant to make my reservation. 



Wind Ensemble returns to live performances with a multicultural program

(11/02/21 6:05am)

This evening at the Hopkins Center for the Arts, the Dartmouth College Wind Ensemble will have its first in-person performance since the start of the pandemic. The 45-member ensemble, conducted by director Brian Messier, will perform a diverse program with repertoire spanning from Hanover to Japan to the border town of Roma, Texas. 


Review: Squid Game Nails Portrayal of Vast Inequality and Human Immorality

(11/02/21 6:00am)

The Korean TV mini-series “Squid Game” seemed to appear out of nowhere, quickly receiving worldwide attention and inciting vast media discourse. Featured on Netflix, “Squid Game” tells the story of a cruel competition for immense wealth — won by playing children’s games with a deadly twist. The show is told through the perspective of player 456, Seong Gi-hun (Lee Jung-jae). Created by South Korean director Hwang Dong-hyuk, “Squid Game” tactfully explores class issues and its viewers’ role in them through superb acting and character development that evokes strong emotional responses. 


Fall Staged Reading Series expands opportunities for student involvement in theater

(10/28/21 6:00am)

This upcoming weekend, the theater department’s Fall Staged Reading Series — the department’s MainStage production this term — will bring three staged readings to the Hopkins Center for the Arts’ Warner Bentley Theater. The series, which will feature Dartmouth student performers, diverges from typical theater productions in relying on minimal set and actor movement.


Review: Solar Power is Lorde’s Poetic Reflection on Fame and Growing Up

(10/26/21 6:00am)

Since the release of her sophomore album, “Melodrama,” four years ago, Lorde has been off the grid, retreating to the New Zealand countryside and even as far as Antarctica. This time in solace is reflected clearly, both lyrically and sonically, in her third studio album, “Solar Power.” Lorde has created a poetic and astonishing album with a beautiful –– though occasionally repetitive –– folk-pop sound. 


Green To Go: A Sip of Millennial Quirkiness at Juel Modern Apothecary

(10/26/21 6:05am)

I needed an experience to lift my mood after the stress of midterms, so my partner and I headed to White River Junction again this weekend. Since we had such a pleasant time at Tuckerbox, we thought we’d see what else the town has to offer. After walking around the narrow, one-way streets, packed with parallel-parked cars on either side, we decided to check out a curious cafe on the corner of North Main Street: Juel Modern Apothecary.


Alum Spotlight: Maeve McBride ’20 explores disabilities through art

(10/21/21 6:00am)

On Oct. 20, the Hood Museum of Art hosted recent graduate and former Conroy Intern, Maeve McBride ’20 for the latest installation of the museum’s “Virtual Space for Dialogue” series. During the talk, McBride discussed her curated collection, “Images of Disability,” which examines how artists with and without disabilities have approached the subject. Featuring pieces from as far back as 1790, the aim of McBride’s collection is to promote conversations about agency, labeling and representation, according to the event’s promotional materials. 



The First-Year Project connects the Class of 2025 with the Dartmouth community through theater

(10/19/21 6:05am)

On October 15 and 16, first-year students participated in the First-Year Project, a two-part performance at the Bentley Theater put on by members of the Class of 2025. The production, directed by theater professor Peter Hackett,  aimed to offer first-year students an opportunity to introduce themselves to the Dartmouth theater department and to the larger community. 


Review: Shang-Chi is a fresh take on the Marvel Cinematic Universe

(10/19/21 6:00am)

“Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings” introduces Shang-Chi (Simu Liu), the titular character, as the newest superhero in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Released in theaters on Sept. 3, Shang-Chi is the first Marvel movie to feature a predominantly Asian cast, have characters with Chinese names and incorporate Mandarin dialogue. The movie weaves classic Marvel action scenes with themes of love and family to create a film that is simultaneously fun and exciting but has the depth of a well-written story. 


Indigenous ceramic and textile artist Anita Fields speaks to students virtually

(10/14/21 6:00am)

On Oct. 13, clay and textile artist Anita Fields participated in a live conversation hosted by the Hood Museum of Art curator of Indigenous art Jami Powell. The conversation focused on Fields’ practice as well as her work, “So Many Ways to Be Human,” which is part of the exhibit “Form and Relation: Contemporary Native Ceramics” that runs from January 2021 to July 2022. Six Indigenous artists are included in this exhibit, which focuses on themes such as community, land, gender and responsibility. Dartmouth ceramics studio director and instructor Jennifer Swanson facilitated the talk. 


Review: Phoebe Bridgers Delivers an Energetic, Riveting Performance in Boston

(10/12/21 6:00am)

Since the release of her critically acclaimed second studio album, “Punisher,” in June 2020, Phoebe Bridgers has had a busy year. From her four Grammy nominations to her controversial Saturday Night Live performance, Bridgers has generated more commercial success than your average quiet, melancholic indie folk singer-songwriter. To top it all off, Bridgers is ending 2021 by going on her first tour since the beginning of the pandemic. On Sept. 27, I had the privilege of attending the second night of her performance at Boston’s Leader Bank Pavilion. While her low-key musical style may not seem particularly well-suited for a venue that seats a few thousand, she gave a generally fantastic performance that captivated the audience.


The “Poetic Healing Showcase” Celebrates Black Art and Voices in a Variety of Mediums

(10/07/21 6:00am)

The Black Underground Theatre Association returns to campus for the first time following the pandemic with the “Poetic Healing Showcase,” a student-run production that according to the organization’s website will highlight Black poetry, prose and creativity. Featuring student and alumni artists, audience members will witness a collection of singers, poets and dancers with no admission fee required.




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