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Long-Awaited Vaccine Dashboard Provides Optimism for Some Students

(20 hours ago)

As the number of people vaccinated continues to rise across the country, the College has released a new “Vaccine Data Reported” section on the COVID-19 dashboard tracking the number of students, faculty and staff that have been vaccinated. This section, added in early May, marks a new stage in the COVID-19 dashboard’s evolution, which members of the community rely on to gauge the College’s success in responding to the virus. 


You Know The Drill

(20 hours ago)

Those who’ve been through drill know that you never forget the feeling of sitting, clammy-handed, in a room with five to eight of your classmates, furiously racking your brain for a verb tense that was just on the tip of your tongue. Drill, otherwise known as the Rassias method, is an essential organ of Dartmouth’s language program. 


The Flair That Binds Us

(20 hours ago)

A normal Dartmouth spring means studying outside, Green Key and graduation, but there’s another spring tradition that encapsulates Dartmouth culture: bequests. All types of campus clubs and organizations share this tradition of passing down items between its members. Ceremonies vary, but every spring, seniors gather up items they wish to pass down and “bequest” — Dartmouth students tend to use “bequest” as both a noun and verb, though, technically, the verb is “bequeath” — them to younger members of their various organizations. It’s equal parts history and hilarity as meaningful years-old items sketched with alumni names change hands — followed by a dinosaur onesie from Walmart. 



Editors' Note

(20 hours ago)

Dartmouth is certainly no stranger to traditions. In its over 250 years, Dartmouth has accumulated dozens of quirky idiosyncrasies that its students have come to cherish. From the flair-adorned upperclassmen that greet freshmen on Trips to Senior Week festivities, one’s Dartmouth career is anchored by an assortment of traditions. As we approach the end to the (hopefully) last academic year of primarily remote courses, we can look forward to a return to these beloved traditions that have been disrupted by the pandemic.   



Lane: Biden and the Youngsters

(05/11/21 6:00am)

In order to win the 2020 presidential election, President Biden made a lot of promises. Not only did he pledge to bring an end to the COVID-19 pandemic via more responsible management, but he also proclaimed that he would dramatically expand health care coverage, meaningfully respond to climate change, combat police brutality, shrink racial economic gaps and use government power to promote economic growth to create vast numbers of new jobs, among a whole host of other promises. While these are all very important topics worthy of addressing, the frank reality is that apart from emergency pandemic response, Biden has failed to get many meaningful initiatives passed by Congress. If this trend continues, he puts his party at risk in the 2022 midterms, which typically act as a referendum on the sitting president’s performance. To keep control of Congress, Biden must act, and he must act now. 


Allen: Don’t Pop the Bubble

(05/11/21 6:05am)

With the United States achieving universal COVID-19 vaccine availability for adults as of April 19 and Dartmouth recently deciding to mandate the vaccine for all students on campus in the fall, a return to normalcy seems to be on the horizon. In light of the recent progress, it’s fair to say that students are looking forward to in-person classes and social activities with minimal risk of catching or spreading COVID-19.




Economics department hosts first-ever workshop series on personal finance

(05/11/21 6:00am)

The Political Economy Project and economics department held two workshops on May 1 and May 8 to teach students about personal finance. The workshops covered topics ranging from budgeting and debt to investing and insurance, and forty-one students attended at least one of the workshops. 



Undergraduate academic dishonesty incidents higher than normal this academic year

(05/10/21 6:10am)

While the Office of Community Standards has seen the “whole gamut” of routine violations this year, the number of students involved in each report has increased, according to office’s director Katharine Strong. Meanwhile, the office has noticed a downward trend in behavioral misconduct — such as alcohol violations — because fewer students populate campus due to reduced capacity, Strong said. 




Seniors express excitement, frustration about College’s late announcement to allow guests at Commencement

(05/10/21 6:02am)

After reiterating in early April its plan to bar guests from attending the 2021 Commencement and investiture ceremonies on June 13, the College reversed this policy on Wednesday, announcing that it would allow each Dartmouth graduate to invite two guests. While some students have received the change with excitement, others expressed frustration with the sudden change in policy.


External investigation clears professor of sexual harassment and retaliation allegations

(05/08/21 5:53pm)

An external investigation into allegations of sexual harassment made by former computer science Ph.D. student Maha Hasan Alshawi, launched by the College last August, found computer science professor Alberto Quattrini Li not responsible for any of the seven allegations against him. The office of the provost released an executive summary of the report — produced by Cozen O'Connor, the law firm retained by the College — on April 30.


Verbum Ultimum: Too Little, Too Late

(05/07/21 6:15am)

In a May 5 campus-wide email, College President Phil Hanlon announced that due to the increasing vaccination rate and the declining COVID-19 incidence rate nationwide, the College will allow graduates to bring up to two guests to graduation. This announcement embraces suggestions made by students following the initial decision to hold Commencement for families virtually and is a promising sign of an impending return to normalcy on campus — something this Editorial Board has argued is overdue. However, while the College should be commended for revising its decision, for many low-income students and their families the eleventh-hour nature of the decision erects significant financial and logistical hurdles and comes as too little, too late. 


Experts discuss sustainable energy’s future at the Irving Institute’s inaugural symposium

(05/07/21 6:00am)

From May 3 to May 5, the Irving Institute for Energy and Society hosted a symposium, titled “Investing in Our Energy Futures,” on the topic of energy access and sustainability. The three-day event featured members of Congress, scientists, engineers and public policy and finance experts.