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The Dartmouth
May 23, 2024 | Latest Issue
The Dartmouth
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News

English FSP killed

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The Committee of Chairs' vote to kill the English foreign study program in London appears to be final. Professor William Spengemann who leads the foreign study program said last week there was a chance one of the department heads who had voted against the program would ask for a revote. But the professor has not come forward and the English department has begun discussing alternatives to the two-term London program. English Department Chair Louis Renza said the department met Wednesday with some senior English majors to discuss possibilities for replacing the terminated program. He said that Spengemann, as director of next year's program at University College London, would investigate opportunities for a one term program in London or elsewhere in England. Both Renza and Spengemann said that since the London program will not end until the 1995-96 academic year, the department has sufficient time to find a replacement to satisfy both the Committee of Chairs and the Office of Off-Campus Programs. Economics Professor Jack Menge, who is the vice chair of the Committee of Chairs, said the professor who was considering calling for a revote decided not to. "No one has come forward," Menge wrote in an electronic mail message.


News

New sorority full; 40 women agree to join Kappa Delta Epsilon

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Fifty women from the Class of 1996 have informally committed themselves to a new local sorority that will move this fall into the Webster Avenue house currently occupied by the dissolving Xi Kappa Chi sorority. The Panhellenic Council voted earlier this month to dissolve Xi Kappa Chi because the sorority has been plagued by low membership and financial problems. Members of the new sorority, Kappa Delta Epsilon, will be almost entirely from the Class of 1996.


News

Hayes to get degree

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Brian Hayes '90, a student who died last August after a long battle with cancer, will receive a posthumous degree at this year's commencement. Several professors and students spearheaded a campaign with the College administration to award Hayes the bachelor of arts degree.



News

Top faculty deans step down

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Two top deans of the faculty will step down this summer after completing four-year terms. Bruce Duncan, the associate dean of the faculty for the humanities, and David Lindgren, who is the associate dean for the social sciences, are in charge of hiring and promoting professors in their divisions and determining how much money each department should receive. Duncan will hand over his post to Professor Mary Jean Green, who is currently the chair of the French and Italian Department.


News

North campus plans finalized

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College officials and the architectural planners behind the northward expansion of the campus will submit their final plans to the Trustees at one of the Board's next two meetings in Hanover, according to Provost John Strohbehn. "We're down to the very last stages," Strohbehn said.



News

James Hornig delivers inaugural lecture

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Chemistry Professor James Hornig delivered an Inaugural Lecture honoring his endowment as the Dartmouth Professor of Chemistry and Environmental Studies yesterday. Speaking to a crowd of about 40 administrators, professors and graduate students in 13 Carpenter Hall, Hornig focused on the integral role of environmental studies in the global agenda and in the Dartmouth education. He said environmental studies is ideally designed for Dartmouth's liberal arts education.


News

President pulling the purse strings

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Fourth in a series of articles about James O. Freedman. In the shadow of a national economic slowdown, Dartmouth's finances under James Freedman proved strong enough to provide confidence in this President's ambitious hopes for the College. Colleges and universities across the country are facing smaller returns from endowments, reduced federal support for research and financial aid and education costs that are rising faster than inflation. At a time when many prestigious universities are experiencing budget deficit crises that have forced deep cutbacks of academic programs and neglect of maintenance needs, Dartmouth has maintained a balanced budget and is proceeding with several bold moves in financial planning: the new curriculum; a reaffirmation of need-blind admissions; a blitz of building construction and campus development; and -- to pay for it all -- the most ambitious fund-raising effort in the College's history. And though fund raising was not his top priority when he took over the President's office, the College's financial health is the key to the Dartmouth education of today and Freedman's hopes and goals for the future. Earlier this month, the College's bond credit rating was upgraded to the highest level possible shared by a group of ten universities considered most financially sound in the nation. Early in his presidency Freeman formed the Planning and Steering Committee, a group of administrators, faculty and students charged with charting the course for Dartmouth to enter the 21st century. The committee produced a 150-page report recommending substantial changes to the College, including major campus development north of Baker Library and a comprehensive review of the curriculum. Five years later north campus development construction is underway and the new curriculum has been approved.


News

Video box in Topside

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The Topside social scene received a shot of excitement May 11 with the addition of a new, shiny video jukebox that can be programmed by touching its screen. The jukebox's musical selections run the gamut of student tastes, including such artists as Billy Ray Cyrus, Butthole Surfers, Lemonheads, Duran Duran, TLC and Lenny Kravitz. Dartmouth Dining Services acquired the machine after Pete Napolitano, the DDS director, was approached by the LaserVideo Network company.



News

Summer Assembly president named

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Student Assembly President-elect Nicole Artzer '94 yesterday appointed Lara Phelps '95 as Assembly president for the Summer term. Artzer said she chose Phelps after working with her on the Assembly's project committee, which addresses student services issues. Phelps served as co-chair of that committee for part of this year. The Assembly traditionally takes on a project-oriented focus during the summer, Artzer said. Phelps is currently in Japan and could not be reached for comment. Artzer said the Summer Assembly will concentrate on the student discount card and a menu book of local restaurants.


News

Gov. Merrill toughens N.H.'s anti-hazing laws

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New Hampshire Governor Steve Merrill signed into law a bill that makes hazing illegal on college campuses. The bill had languished for months in the State Senate and House of Representatives before passing early this month. An earlier version of the bill would have applied only to colleges and universities.



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Srodes '93 arrested for assault

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Hanover Police arrested Michael Srodes '93 at Psi Upsilon fraternity Monday morning on the charge of second degree assault, according to Officer Patrick O'Neill. The arrest occurred more than three weeks after Srodes allegedly struck Jeffrey Schumacher, a visitor to the College, in the head with an aluminum baseball bat early in the morning on May 2 during a Psi U party. Police said Schumacher was treated for serious head lacerations. If brought to trial and convicted, Srodes could face jail time and a major fine, O'Neill said. The arrest report schedules Srodes, who could not be reached for comment, for a June 8 arraignment in Hanover District Court.


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Rugby collects for clubhouse

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The Men's and Women's Rugby Clubs have received permission from the Board of Trustees to solicit funds to build a new clubhouse as part of the Will to Excel Campaign. According to Rugby Coach Wayne Young, the men's and women's clubs must raise $500,000 between them before they can begin construction on the clubhouse, which will be located behind Garipay Field.


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Panelists discuss the future of liberal arts

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Participants in a panel discussion last night called "Dartmouth Undying" lashed out against the College's current liberal arts education and offered visions of the future. Religion Professor Susan Ackerman, Senior Class President Doug Chia, English Professor William Cook, Susie Lee '94 and Dean of Student Life Holly Sateia comprised the panel, which often focused on how much emphasis the College should give to traditionally marginalized academic voices. Jay Heinrichs, editor of the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine and moderator of the event, opened the panel by saying that while the traditional liberal arts concept has changed, it still focuses on the national elite. Lee said there is a syndrome of "preaching to the choir" at discussion events like last night's panel.



News

President's quest: Freedman strives for intellectualism

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Second in a series of articles about James O. Freedman. Dartmouth's Board of Trustees hired James Freedman as the 15th President of the College with one goal in mind: to improve the intellectual atmosphere of a school that ranked as the least academic of the Ivies. Freedman took over the presidency from David McLaughlin '54, a businessman and CEO without a doctoral degree who was heavily criticized by the faculty for his lack of intellectual leadership. In January 1985, an ad hoc committee formed by the faculty to examine the governance of the College released a report sharply criticizing McLaughlin's leadership style.


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Faculty told of provost

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At the only full faculty meeting scheduled for this term, College President James Freedman officially announced his selection of Michigan Law School Dean Lee Bollinger to be the next provost. At the meeting, Freedman describing and briefly defended a search process that came up with a short list of four male candidates. The faculty also heard Director of Admission Karl Furstenburg report on the Class of 1997.