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Review: Elton John demonstrates breadth of talent and successful discography at Gillette Stadium concert

(08/12/22 6:00am)

I am a sucker for a concert. If anyone notable is playing within three hours of me, I can’t help but go. I’m attracted to the energy, the lights, the live music, the food  — and my wallet hates me for it. So, when my friend texted me last minute about seeing Elton John in Foxborough, Mass. on July 27, suddenly the interview I had the next day, my upcoming midterm and my discussion post due in two hours all fell to the wayside. Nosebleed tickets were purchased and an outfit was thrown together. Piling into my beloved Subaru with four other Dartmouth students, we began the three-hour drive to Gillette Stadium. Throughout the drive, we couldn’t hold in our excitement as we listened to John’s greatest hits and made a brief Chick-fil-A stop on the way.


Behind the Scenes: Student Bands at Dartmouth

(08/05/22 5:00am)

When a fraternity announces that a student band is playing, you’ll typically see a rush of people attempting to get into the venue. Inside, you’ll find a sea of students crammed together as an audience, with fellow students shredding, singing and grooving along to their own live music. With such an entertaining product, most students overlook the two essential questions: How does this whole scene work and what goes into each performance? As someone who has played in all four campus bands this summer — Exit 13, Gibberish, Tightrope and The Stripers — I’m well equipped to answer.


Dance Theatre of Harlem completes third summer residency at the Hop

(08/05/22 5:05am)

This summer marks the last year of Dance Theatre of Harlem’s three-year residency at the Hopkins Center for the Arts. The collaboration, which began in 2020, has included master classes, pop-up shows, collaboration with theater classes, a visit to the Hood and previews of The Hazel Scott Project, which developed over the course of the past three summers. 


Students design, create mural in Irving Institute atrium

(07/29/22 5:00am)

In fall 2021, a team of students received a challenge: How could they make the energy efficiency of the Irving Institute for Energy and Society more visible to everyday visitors of the building? In response, the team commissioned a mural, which a group of student artists then conceptualized in the spring. The mural is now visible to the public in the atrium of the Irving Center. 


Q&A with Hopkins Center executive director Mary Lou Aleskie

(07/29/22 5:05am)

With plans for the renovation of the Hopkins Center for the Arts underway, executive director of the Hop Mary Lou Aleskie has committed to serving in the role for another term. Aleskie began in the position in 2017, and during her first term, the College announced an $88 million dollar expansion to the Hop. The Dartmouth sat down with Aleskie to discuss her role as executive director and what she hopes the renovation of the Hop will bring to the local arts community.


Review: The Dead & Company’s concerts at Citi Field perfectly concludes their summer tour

(07/22/22 5:00am)

The Grateful Dead have been the soundtrack to all my best memories — the ride to and from school every day, my dad singing “Brown-Eyed Women” to me while making pancakes every Sunday morning, driving to Atlanta for my first Dead & Company concert in 2017. I have been a Deadhead since birth; both my parents are avid fans and have been playing their music since before I could walk. Now that I’m grown and my parents’ love for the band has evolved into my own, riding about six hours on the Dartmouth Coach to New York to see Dead & Company — the Grateful Dead legacy band featuring icons Bob Weir, Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann, along with John Mayer, Oteil Burbridge and Jeff Chimenti — was an easy sacrifice to make. 


Silkroad Ensemble with Rhiannon Giddens perform ‘Phoenix Rising’ at the Hop

(07/22/22 5:00am)

Thirteen Silkroad Ensemble artists performed “Phoenix Rising” with artistic director and Grammy Award-winning musician Rhiannon Giddens on Tuesday at the Hopkins Center for the Arts. The ensemble — composed of artists with diverse backgrounds and unique musical experiences — performed a program of 10 pieces, including new commissions, reimagined arrangements and two world premieres. The works drew inspiration from the North of Scotland, folk music from the American South, Japanese court music and Iranian folk music. 


Q&A with ‘Female Complaints’ writer Kate Mulley ’05

(07/15/22 6:00am)

Playwright Kate Mulley ’05 recently collaborated with musical artist Tina deVaron to write the musical “Female Complaints,” which they brought to Dartmouth to workshop as part of VoxLab — a theater residency held each summer for alums to develop their projects. From July 4 to July 10, a select group of students in the course THEA 65, “Summer Theater Lab,” brought Mulley and deVaron’s vision to life for the first time. According to the show’s promotional materials, “Female Complaints” is a musical that tells the story of the highly skilled abortionist Inez Ingenthron in the 1900s, who becomes the target of the San Francisco district attorney due to her illegal abortion practices. The Dartmouth talked to Mulley about the process of writing and workshopping “Female Complaints,” as well as its relevance in the context of the recent Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.


Review: ‘Stanley Tucci: Searching for Italy’ provides a view of Italy’s culinary diversity

(07/08/22 5:00am)

In the second season of the CNN original documentary series “Stanley Tucci: Searching for Italy,” actor, writer and producer Stanley Tucci continues his travels across Italy to learn about the nation’s cuisine and culture. Over the course of four episodes, the four-time Emmy Award winner and Academy Award nominee brings his audience across different regions of Italy  — Venice, Piedmont and Umbria — with the final episode taking place in London. Tucci focuses not only on each region’s signature dishes, but the rich history and legacy of these dishes. 


Musings from the Museums of Washington D.C.: Portraits, Photos, Stories

(07/08/22 5:05am)

Over the last month, various students interning in Washington D.C. have spent time hopping from museum to museum, reveling in the National Gallery of Art, the Hirshhorn and the Smithsonian museums as arbiters of history. Gazing at unfinished portraits of U.S. presidents in the National Portrait Gallery or indulging in the abstract modern exhibits of the Hirshhorn have brought to life the historical anecdotes previously heard in class, according to some students. 




Review: ‘Book Lovers’ is enemies to lovers without lovers or enemies

(07/01/22 5:00am)

There are many ways to begin a love story. Don’t believe me? Just walk into any bookstore’s romance section. You will stumble across microgenres like friends to lovers, co-workers to lovers, childhood neighbors to lovers, sister-in-law to lovers (hello Bridgerton season two!), strangers to lovers, fake lovers to lovers, fake lovers to lovers but for young adults — the list goes on. But — in accordance with the truism that the opposite of love is not hate, but rather indifference — the crown jewel plot line of contemporary romance is enemies to lovers. While I don’t personally get it — call me old fashioned but I’d rather my significant other like me instead of abhor me (been there done that!) — enemies to lovers is a long time favorite. From “Pride and Prejudice” to “When Harry Met Sally,” as a society, we cannot  get enough of weirdly charged meet-cutes and declarations of hatred that turn into passionate kisses. I mean, anyone with a soul can admit that Elizabeth telling Darcy that he is the last man on Earth she could ever marry (while he stares longingly at her in the pouring rain) is damn good cinema. Who among us can forget Julia Stiles’s character in “Ten Things I Hate About You” reading a poem addressed to her enemy, played by Heath Ledger, that ends with “But mostly I hate the way I don’t hate you, not even close, not even a little bit, not even at all.” No one, that’s who. Enemies to lovers is all about the tension! The unspoken feelings! The miscommunication! The passion! The way they don’t hate each other, not even at all! The crux of enemies to lovers is a simple reversal of expectations. It really doesn’t take much. But Emily Henry makes that easy equation look pretty difficult in her third novel “Book Lovers.” 


Q&A With Green Key Performer Parrotfish

(06/02/22 6:00am)

Parrotfish, a Tampa, Florida based band, made up of members Conor Lynch (vocals), Joe Cadrecha (guitar), Trace Chiappe (drums) and Matty Rodrigo (bass), recently performed for Dartmouth students at Phi Delta Alpha fraternity’s block party. The band kicked off the Green Key weekend with an electric performance that drew a massive crowd and packed Webster Avenue. The Dartmouth sat down with Parrotfish to discuss their history as a band, their Dartmouth performance and their many plans for the future. 


​​Review: Kendrick Lamar delivers a more inward focus with his new album

(07/01/22 5:05am)

On his last three albums, Kendrick Lamar has explored a range of lofty topics. On “Good Kid, m.A.A.d City” (2012), he used his experience as a teenager in Compton, CA., to make a general statement about growing up in impoverished urban areas. In “To Pimp a Butterfly” (2015), Lamar wrote about the experience of black people in America more broadly. In “DAMN.” (2017), Lamar wrote about emotions in a more abstract way; he was still presenting himself as a larger-than-life figure, one who many listeners treat as a role model. But now, after a five year wait, Kendrick finally makes an attempt to present himself only as a human being with faults and vulnerabilities on his new album “Mr. Morale and the Big Steppers.”


Brancusi ‘Bird in Space’ Captures Attention in the Hood’s Front Window

(05/31/22 6:00am)

When John Stomberg was the chief curator at the Williams College Museum of Art, the museum’s board told him he was crazy for inquiring about obtaining a work by Romanian artist Constantin Brancusi, who is considered one of the most influential sculptors of the 20th century, for the museum’s collection. Now, as director of the Hood Museum of Art, Stomberg can look back on the encounter as a fond precursor to what he has achieved today.


“Harry’s House” is an intimate diversion from Styles’ previous work

(05/26/22 6:05am)

Driving back from New York on the morning of the album’s release, “Harry’s House” was the soundtrack of my return to campus. With nothing but long highways and sleeping passengers — coupled with Waze occasionally interrupting the soft crooning of Harry Styles — I was able to give this album the attention it deserved, which is what has made me appreciate its many nuances and subtleties so much.


Q&A with photographer and filmmaker Hollye Swinehart ’18

(05/26/22 6:00am)

During her time at Dartmouth, Hollye Swinehart ’18 discovered her love for art and photography at the Hopkins Center for the Arts. Now, Swinehart is preparing to film her senior thesis for her Masters in the Arts at the London Film School, a short film called “Cotton Something.” Swinehart is set to graduate in December and submit her film to festivals such as the Telluride Film Festival and Sundance Film Festival. The Dartmouth sat down with Swinehart to discuss her journey from photography to filmmaking and her advice for Dartmouth students on pursuing a career in the arts. 






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