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‘The Force of Things: An Opera for Objects’ brings environmentally-minded theater to Dartmouth

(01/13/22 7:00am)

Loosely categorized as an “opera,” “The Force of Things: An Opera for Objects” is an intense visual and sonic performance intended to engage with the ramifications of climate change through a collective audience experience. The performance will take place from Jan. 13 to Jan 16 at the Moore Theater in the Hopkins Center for the Arts. It is created by sibling duo Adam Fure and music professor Ash Fure and co-directed by music professor César Alvarez. Ash Fure also works as a music professor at Dartmouth, and Adam Fure is an architecture professor at the University of Michigan.


Alum Spotlight: studio art intern Phoebe Kong ’21 prepares for 2022 exhibitions

(01/11/22 7:00am)

Studio art intern Phoebe Kong ’21 sits at the desk of her studio in the Black Family Visual Arts Center. As one of five chosen interns, she will spend the year building her portfolio and assisting in undergraduate art classes before applying to MFA programs. Behind her is a collage wall composed of various prints of her family, each connected by her various drawing studies. 


“Spider-Man: No Way Home” celebrates its beloved characters (Spoilers)

(01/07/22 7:05am)

One of the most highly anticipated movies of the year, “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” incited a mass exodus of fans from the comfort of their couches back to the theater’s big screen. With various spoilers circulating on the internet since the movie’s release on Dec. 17, the movie demands an in-theater viewing for the most genuine experience. Racing to see it myself, I was struck by the emotionality woven into the action of this film that celebrates Spider-Man’s legacy and future. 


Hanover High alumnus Julian Higgins on his upcoming film “God’s Country”

(01/07/22 7:00am)

In his first feature film, “God’s Country,” Hanover High School alumnus Julian Higgins explores morality in an immoral world. Struggling against racism and sexism in daily life, a Black female professor has her strength of character put to the test when hunters trespass on her land. “God’s Country” will premiere in the 2022 Sundance Film Festival this month. 



‘Red (Taylor’s Version)’ Reworks a Pop Classic into an Expressive Reflection

(12/05/21 5:26pm)

If you’ll excuse the pun, I seem to be building a reputation for myself as The D’s resident Taylor Swift reviewer. In May 2019, I deemed “ME!” from “Lover” uninspired. In July 2020, I fancied the mature melancholy of “folklore.” Now, in December 2021, I’d like to talk about “Red (Taylor’s Version).” There is something so innately powerful in those parentheses — they signify that Swift has become the songsmith and owner of her music. Indeed, the re-recorded version of her 2012 album is a strong, intentional reflection on fame and heartbreak, guided by its thematic and tonal lodestar, the epic 10-minute version of “All Too Well.” A pivot from the in-your-face nature of her prior pop albums, this music, like “evermore” and “folklore,” employs minimal instrumentals and lucid, expressive vocals that tell a tale of graceful rebirth.


2021 Music in Review: The 10 Best Albums of the Year

(11/16/21 7:05am)

After the strange, pandemic-dominated year of music that was 2020, 2021 felt like a return to normalcy for the music industry. Albums that had been postponed due to COVID were released, major artists like Kanye West and Drake dropped new albums and many albums devised during the lockdowns of the previous year saw artists exploring new directions. One notable musical event of the year that will not be included on this list was Taylor Swift’s re-releases of her older albums as “Taylor’s Version”; because none of that music was written in 2021, it will not be included on this list. Otherwise, here are the ten best albums released in 2021.


Hood Museum conversation with artist Julie Mehretu explores the intersection of art and science

(11/16/21 7:00am)

On Nov. 12, the Hood Museum of Art hosted a conversation between artist Julie Mehretu, Museum of Modern Art curator Ugochukwu-Smooth Nzewi and physics professor Marcelo Gleiser as part of the Dr. Allen W. Root Contemporary Art Distinguished Lectureship. Led by Nzewi, the conversation spanned a variety of topics, from their shared experience as immigrants who lived under military dictatorships to the relationship between art and science and the tension between the known and unknown, both in physics and in art. 


Coast Jazz Orchestra’s final show of the term to feature Bill Lowe, ensemble

(11/11/21 7:00am)

The Coast Jazz Orchestra will hold their third concert of the term today at 9 p.m. at Collis Common Ground. Jazz musician Bill Lowe and his ensemble, the Signifyin’ Natives, will join the student band. Lowe has played with avant-garde musicians such as Henry Threadgill and Muhal Richard Abrams, but has also collaborated with straight-ahead jazz musicians like Frank Foster and Thad Jones.




‘Poor Clare’ shines light on the complications of diversity in theater

(11/09/21 7:10am)

Diversity in theater has long been a topic of controversy, confusion and complications — and the Dartmouth theater department is no exception. As a college, Dartmouth has come a long way in terms of diversity, but — as the recent staged reading of the play “Poor Clare” demonstrates — what diversity looks like and how to achieve it is no simple task. 


Green To Go: Carpenter and Main serves Vermont on a plate

(11/09/21 7:00am)

This past weekend, I crossed the Connecticut River and visited the town of Norwich. A friend told me about a great restaurant there called Carpenter and Main. The fact that Bruce MacLeod, chef and owner of the restaurant, graduated from Dartmouth in 1984 piqued my interest, so I eagerly called the restaurant to make my reservation. 



Wind Ensemble returns to live performances with a multicultural program

(11/02/21 6:05am)

This evening at the Hopkins Center for the Arts, the Dartmouth College Wind Ensemble will have its first in-person performance since the start of the pandemic. The 45-member ensemble, conducted by director Brian Messier, will perform a diverse program with repertoire spanning from Hanover to Japan to the border town of Roma, Texas. 


Review: Squid Game Nails Portrayal of Vast Inequality and Human Immorality

(11/02/21 6:00am)

The Korean TV mini-series “Squid Game” seemed to appear out of nowhere, quickly receiving worldwide attention and inciting vast media discourse. Featured on Netflix, “Squid Game” tells the story of a cruel competition for immense wealth — won by playing children’s games with a deadly twist. The show is told through the perspective of player 456, Seong Gi-hun (Lee Jung-jae). Created by South Korean director Hwang Dong-hyuk, “Squid Game” tactfully explores class issues and its viewers’ role in them through superb acting and character development that evokes strong emotional responses. 


Fall Staged Reading Series expands opportunities for student involvement in theater

(10/28/21 6:00am)

This upcoming weekend, the theater department’s Fall Staged Reading Series — the department’s MainStage production this term — will bring three staged readings to the Hopkins Center for the Arts’ Warner Bentley Theater. The series, which will feature Dartmouth student performers, diverges from typical theater productions in relying on minimal set and actor movement.


Review: Solar Power is Lorde’s Poetic Reflection on Fame and Growing Up

(10/26/21 6:00am)

Since the release of her sophomore album, “Melodrama,” four years ago, Lorde has been off the grid, retreating to the New Zealand countryside and even as far as Antarctica. This time in solace is reflected clearly, both lyrically and sonically, in her third studio album, “Solar Power.” Lorde has created a poetic and astonishing album with a beautiful –– though occasionally repetitive –– folk-pop sound. 


Green To Go: A Sip of Millennial Quirkiness at Juel Modern Apothecary

(10/26/21 6:05am)

I needed an experience to lift my mood after the stress of midterms, so my partner and I headed to White River Junction again this weekend. Since we had such a pleasant time at Tuckerbox, we thought we’d see what else the town has to offer. After walking around the narrow, one-way streets, packed with parallel-parked cars on either side, we decided to check out a curious cafe on the corner of North Main Street: Juel Modern Apothecary.


Alum Spotlight: Maeve McBride ’20 explores disabilities through art

(10/21/21 6:00am)

On Oct. 20, the Hood Museum of Art hosted recent graduate and former Conroy Intern, Maeve McBride ’20 for the latest installation of the museum’s “Virtual Space for Dialogue” series. During the talk, McBride discussed her curated collection, “Images of Disability,” which examines how artists with and without disabilities have approached the subject. Featuring pieces from as far back as 1790, the aim of McBride’s collection is to promote conversations about agency, labeling and representation, according to the event’s promotional materials. 




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