Search Results


Use the fields below to perform an advanced search of The Dartmouth 's archives. This will return articles, images, and multimedia relevant to your query.




1000 items found for your search. If no results were found please broaden your search.



Review: ‘The Satanic Verses’ continues to provoke controversy and violence

(11/14/22 7:00am)

On Aug. 12, 2022, world renowned Indian-British-American author Salman Rushdie was stabbed repeatedly in an assassination attempt at a conference in New York. He was slated to present his thoughts on freedom of speech as an exiled author in America. He was initially exiled from Iran and targeted due to his depiction of the Prophet Muhammed in his book “The Satanic Verses,” which was released in 1988. Growing up in a liberal Muslim family, Rushdie now firmly considers himself to be an atheist — a conversion which is not taken lightly in the Islamic faith. 


Review: ‘Amsterdam’ shows the importance of community in the midst of uncertainty

(11/14/22 7:05am)

David O. Russell’s latest film, “Amsterdam,” is — at its core — a historical comedy and conspiracy thriller that dives into the power of friendship and loyalty. Set primarily in 1930s New York against a backdrop of social and racial inequality, the film touches on issues of post-traumatic stress disorder, white supremacy and the rise of American fascism. Though the overarching theme is a comforting message of the value or relationships in uncertain times, this is lost due to the film’s poor pacing and timeline which is difficult to follow. 



Q&A with pastry chef Claire Saffitz

(11/11/22 7:00am)

A recipe developer, New York Times Cooking contributor and video host, Claire Saffitz is not just any pastry chef. After reaching internet stardom through Bon Appétit’s “Gourmet Makes” YouTube series, Saffitz started her own channel, “Dessert Person,” to reach home bakers with approachable recipes. Her latest cookbook “What’s for Dessert” comes out this week, and Saffitz visited Norwich for a book event on Nov. 10. The Dartmouth sat down with Saffitz to discuss her newest project, careers in food media and baking in a dorm kitchen.


Review: ‘It Starts With Us’ takes readers through the pain of new beginnings

(11/07/22 8:00am)

“It Starts With Us” is Colleen Hoover’s sequel to her best-selling novel and BookTok sensation, “It Ends With Us.” The sequel begins directly after “It Ends With Us” and brings the reader through the intricacies of life after divorce and domestic abuse. “It Starts With Us” is a lighter read than its predecessor,  allowing the reader to experience Atlas and Lily’s relationship as they navigate divorce, found family and starting a new life after abuse. In many ways, Hoover presents a “second-chance” romance that alternates between Atlas’s and Lily’s points of views. “It Ends With Us” must be read first in order to fully understand the magnitude of some of the trivial events in “It Starts With Us.”


‘Park Dae Sung: Ink Reimagined’ unearths the roots of Korean culture

(11/11/22 7:05am)

‘Park Dae Sung: Ink Reimagined,’ a solo exhibition of the artist’s contemporary ink-and-wash works, is currently on display at the Hood Museum of Art until March 19, 2023. The exhibition is not only the largest exhibition of Park’s art to ever reach America, but is also one of five major exhibitions currently available in the U.S.. Furthermore, Park gave a lecture at the Hood on Nov. 3 and the Hood Museum hosted a full-day symposium about Korean contemporary art, co-organized by the College, the Korea Foundation and the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art on Nov. 4.


Theater MainStage ‘Pippin’ aims to spread hope, joy on campus

(11/04/22 6:00am)

This term, the Dartmouth theater department will put on pop musical “Pippin” as its MainStage production. The show opens on Nov. 4 and will run until Nov. 13 for a total of seven shows. The two-act musical, written by Roger O. Hirson, composed by Stephen Schwartz, follows Pippin — the heir to the throne of King Charlemagne — as he tries to find purpose by experimenting with art, war, religion, power, love and revolution. 


Review: ‘House of the Dragon’ captures the magic of Westeros with casting and design

(10/31/22 6:05am)

As an avid “Game of Thrones” fan, I have been counting down the minutes to its highly anticipated prequel, “House of the Dragon,” since its announcement in 2019. Like many “Game of Thrones” fans, I was wildly disappointed by its unfulfilling finale that left me irrationally angry; a rushed ending that throws away about eight seasons of character development is no way to reward fans for their dedication. Even so, I was excited to restart my obsession with the “Game of Thrones” world — now with new characters, romances and drama. 



Reimagining the Arts at Dartmouth: The Hopkins Center Renovations

(10/28/22 6:05am)

Since 1962, The Hopkins Center for the Arts has provided a space for creativity, collaboration and community at Dartmouth. As one of the largest buildings on campus — standing at 175,000 square feet — the Hop is preparing to undergo a major renovation guided by the design firm Snøhetta. The renovation aims to create spaces that are welcoming and accessible, as well as introduce more places to gather and experience the arts as a community.


Review: ‘Midnights’ is a testament to transformation

(10/24/22 6:05am)

Like many others, I have grown up with each new Taylor Swift album. Her new album “Midnights,” released on Oct. 21, is no exception. With “Midnights,” Swift transitions out of the acoustic sound which characterized her three most recent releases. The album felt different from my expectations, but upon the second listen I genuinely enjoyed it. It’s a unique sound and aesthetic for Taylor Swift, establishing a truly new era. The songs span a wide variety of topics so that nearly everyone can relate to something in the album. 


Trends: From Movie Theaters to Netflix: Streaming Services are Here to Stay

(10/24/22 6:00am)

Over the last decade, interest in going to movie theaters has been decreasing as a direct effect of the growing popularity of major streaming services, such as Netflix and Amazon Prime. This reduces the number of people who go to movie theaters to see the latest films and damages the industry irrevocably. It’s important to ask: Does this show how technology is killing the traditional industries of society — or rather, does it have beneficial, innovative impacts on accessibility?




The Manchester Collective explores the melding of African and European music styles

(10/21/22 6:05am)

The Manchester Collective, in collaboration with South African cellist Abel Selaocoe and the Chesaba trio, began their American tour of “Sirocco” at the Hopkins Center for the Arts on Thursday, Oct. 6. The Collective features violinists Rakhi Singh — the group’s music Director — and Sammy Singh, as well as violist Ruth Gibson. They were joined by Selaocoe who served as both the guest director and narrator of the performance, as well as bass guitarist Alan Keary and percussionist Dudu Kouate to compile a performance featuring a wide repertoire from multiple continents and cultural backgrounds. 


'Animal Modernities' addresses questions of animals’ agency in modern art

(10/21/22 6:00am)

The “Animal Modernities” symposium brought together professors from around the world to speak on an extraordinarily wide range of topics relating to the way in which animal depictions in 18th and 19th century art reveal the changing relationship between humans and animals over time. The symposium, which took place on Oct. 13, was hosted by the Leslie Center for the Arts and Humanities and the Departments of Art History, French and Italian in the Hopkins Center for the Arts.



Review: Noah Kahan’s ‘Stick Season’ beautifully captures the complexities of homesickness

(10/17/22 6:00am)

Growing up in a desert city, I never thought that I would be so deeply connected to an album written about a small town in Vermont. Yet, Noah Kahan’s “Stick Season,” released on Oct. 14, perfectly embodies the transitional period between fall and winter in New England — something Dartmouth students are all too familiar with. For the Dartmouth community, this album is already a community treasure: Kahan graduated from Hanover High School and draws on his upbringings in Strafford, Vt. and Hanover in the album.  Whether a New England native or someone who has never visited, Kahan has created widespread nostalgia for the region through the album. 


Q&A with debut author Caroline Cook ’21

(10/14/22 6:00am)

Caroline Cook’s ’21 first novel, “Tell Them To Be Quiet and Wait” will be released on Nov. 1 to coincide with Dartmouth’s 50th anniversary of coeducation. The book is inspired by the life of Hannah Croasdale, Dartmouth’s first female professor to receive tenure. The novel follows two fictional women from two different times, 1935 and 2015, and explores how each navigates academia and science all the while emulating the true events of Croasdale’s life. During her time at Dartmouth, Cook studied Croasdale extensively through a student research fellowship at the Rauner Special Collections Library. 


Jacinda Townsend chats about crafting characters in Cleopatra Mathis Poetry & Prose Lecture

(10/14/22 6:04am)

On Sept. 29, award-winning writer Jacinda Townsend delivered the Cleopatra Mathis Poetry & Prose Lecture at Sanborn Library. This annual lecture series was created in honor of the founder of Dartmouth’s creative writing program, Cleopatra Mathis, to connect students to literary figures. 




Advertise your student group in The Dartmouth for free!