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Midsummer Musings: The Finals Arrival of Giannis Antetekoumpo

(07/16/21 6:00am)

After the Phoenix Suns won both of their home games in the NBA Finals, taking a commanding early 2-0 lead in the series, the Bucks’ title expectations seemed to be on the ropes. Cue the “Suns in 4” jokes. Unable to withstand consecutive offensive onslaughts from Chris Paul and Devin Booker, even with a dominant 42-point, 12-rebound, four-assist performance from Giannis Antetekoumpo in Game 2, the Bucks looked cooked.



New Hampshire Supreme Court unanimously strikes down SB 3, again certifying students’ right to vote in-state

(07/16/21 9:00am)

On July 2, the New Hampshire Supreme Court unanimously struck down a 2017 Republican-backed voting law known as Senate Bill 3, finding that it “imposes unreasonable burdens on the right to vote.” The ruling is a victory for critics of the bill who contend that SB 3 had made it more difficult for college students domiciled in the state to vote in New Hampshire. 


Just Passing Through!

(07/16/21 7:10am)

With the White Mountains as a backyard, Dartmouth has always provided a temporary home to through hikers, whether they’re just hiking in the area or trekking the entire Appalachian Trail. If your curiosity has ever been piqued by someone in town with a frame pack more than half their size, chances are, you’ve caught a through hiker.



Review: Marvel’s ‘Black Widow’ is Thrilling, but Lacks Depth Natasha Deserves

(07/16/21 5:04am)

Marvel’s “Black Widow” weaves a touching story about abuse, family and survival. The movie tackles the difficult theme of the dehumanization of young women through fantastic acting, writing and, of course, fighting. In the larger context of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, though, “Black Widow” still feels like too little, too late for the titular character. After a decade as a superhero sidekick, fans can’t help but feel that Black Widow deserved more.


The Hood hosts virtual public workshop on expressive writing

(07/16/21 5:09am)

On July 15, the Hood Museum of Art sponsored a workshop on expressive writing, the sixth installment of the virtual series. The event was co-facilitated by the founder of the Writer’s Center of White River Junction Joni Cole and Hood teaching specialist Vivian Ladd. The event, which took place Thursday evening over Zoom, was free and open to the public. 





Sororities issue interim requirements for social events with fraternities, full list still pending

(07/13/21 5:28pm)

As nighttime parties return to Webster Avenue, Dartmouth’s eight sororities have issued a list of interim requirements for social gatherings held in conjunction with fraternities, effective as of July 8. The short, partially redacted list of four rules, which was sent to fraternities over the past week, was obtained by The Dartmouth, and its authenticity was confirmed by Inter-Sorority Council president Molly Katarincic ’22. 



Whitcomb: Experience Counts

(07/13/21 8:10am)

Today, please make the time to participate in Hanover’s Town Meeting at the Dewey Field Parking Lot. Hanover residents will have the opportunity to vote by official ballot for town officers and four articles. Residents will also have the opportunity to attend the Business Meeting, starting at 7 p.m., to discuss and vote on articles six through 21, which pertain to matters such as the annual budget, bridge bonds and the Community Power Plan. I’m running for Selectboard to continue to support the pandemic recovery, ensure the successful re-evaluation of properties, encourage good planning and improve communications. 



First-Year Trips to return in the fall

(07/09/21 9:10am)

After a year of nontraditional orientation activities, Dartmouth First-Year Trips will return to more regular outdoor programming this fall to welcome the Class of 2025 to Hanover. Though much of this year’s programming will remain similar to past years , the Trips directorate has implemented activities and scheduling changes that they believe will make the Trips experience more accessible for incoming students.


Athlete Ally updates Dartmouth’s LGBTQ+ inclusion score to perfect

(07/09/21 6:05am)

On June 25, Athlete Ally, an organization dedicated to ending homophobia and transphobia in sports, updated their rating of the Athletic Department’s inclusion policies, changing Dartmouth’s Athlete Equality Index score to 100 out of 100. In March, Dartmouth received a score of 40 out of 100 from the same organization. 



Arabian: Impasse in the Articles

(07/09/21 8:00am)

Since November of last year, the Ethiopian military has been at odds with insurgent forces in the country’s northernmost state of Tigray. Stirred by an increasing sense of ethnic nationalism, the current fighting has led many to call for the state’s independence. While the state is functionally independent as is, the Tigray People’s Liberation Front has declared its willingness to formally and permanently part with Ethiopia if the violence continues. However, whether the world will accept an independent Tigray is a difficult question to answer. Self-determination has consistently been the subject of controversy in international relations, especially because the United Nations charter does not contain any clear and certain guidance on the topic. In one section, it claims to support the “self-determination of peoples,” and presumably the right of people to become independent — while in another, pouring cold water on any sort of secession, forbidding infringements “against the territorial integrity … of any state.” These respective articles have been used in the past to justify both pro- and anti-independence viewpoints, leaving conflicts with no clear path to peace. The U.N. Charter must be updated to resolve this contradiction once and for all. 


Arrington: Unrighteous Religion

(07/09/21 8:05am)

This past June, the Supreme Court handed its latest victory to religious interests in the case Fulton v. City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the most recent in a series of rulings expanding the scope of freedom of religion under the First Amendment. The Court unanimously sided with Catholic Social Services, an organization that did not recognize marriages between same-sex partners and refused to certify them as foster parents, allowing the organization to retain their place as an official foster service provider for Philadelphia. The case is yet another in the trend of organizations, corporations, and individuals using religious liberty to justify discrimination — over the past decade, an unprecedented series of ‘wins’ for religious freedom have threatened some protections against employment discrimination, allowed the refusal of service to LGBTQ+ people and weakened access to reproductive healthcare. We as a society must more specifically define what religious freedom is and is not and combat its use to harm marginalized communities.