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Seniors express excitement, frustration about College’s late announcement to allow guests at Commencement

(05/10/21 6:02am)

After reiterating in early April its plan to bar guests from attending the 2021 Commencement and investiture ceremonies on June 13, the College reversed this policy on Wednesday, announcing that it would allow each Dartmouth graduate to invite two guests. While some students have received the change with excitement, others expressed frustration with the sudden change in policy.


External investigation clears professor of sexual harassment and retaliation allegations

(05/08/21 5:53pm)

An external investigation into allegations of sexual harassment made by former computer science Ph.D. student Maha Hasan Alshawi, launched by the College last August, found computer science professor Alberto Quattrini Li not responsible for any of the seven allegations against him. The office of the provost released an executive summary of the report — produced by Cozen O'Connor, the law firm retained by the College — on April 30.


Verbum Ultimum: Too Little, Too Late

(05/07/21 6:15am)

In a May 5 campus-wide email, College President Phil Hanlon announced that due to the increasing vaccination rate and the declining COVID-19 incidence rate nationwide, the College will allow graduates to bring up to two guests to graduation. This announcement embraces suggestions made by students following the initial decision to hold Commencement for families virtually and is a promising sign of an impending return to normalcy on campus — something this Editorial Board has argued is overdue. However, while the College should be commended for revising its decision, for many low-income students and their families the eleventh-hour nature of the decision erects significant financial and logistical hurdles and comes as too little, too late. 


Experts discuss sustainable energy’s future at the Irving Institute’s inaugural symposium

(05/07/21 6:00am)

From May 3 to May 5, the Irving Institute for Energy and Society hosted a symposium, titled “Investing in Our Energy Futures,” on the topic of energy access and sustainability. The three-day event featured members of Congress, scientists, engineers and public policy and finance experts. 





Dokken: The Power of a Legacy

(05/06/21 6:05am)

The preferential treatment of legacy students in the admission process at many American universities is a practice that has been around for almost a century despite the practice’s anti-Semitic and xenophobic roots. In fact, the practice of legacy admissions began at Dartmouth in 1922, and soon after, other institutions adopted the practice as a means of reducing the number of recent Eastern European immigrants — a large majority of whom were Jewish — who were admitted. Today, universities maintain the practice more out of tradition and fear that without it, alumni donations will plummet, but its effect is no less damaging than it was at its bigoted beginnings. In honor of the 100th anniversary of Dartmouth’s use of legacy preference in admissions, Dartmouth should acknowledge the ridiculousness and inequity of this practice and end the use of legacy preference in admissions. 



Review: “RuPaul’s Drag Race” season 13’s mediocre production overshadows contestants’ talent

(05/06/21 6:00am)

The popular reality television series “RuPaul’s Drag Race” is a rare staple in both queer and mainstream culture, appealing to a wide range of audiences through its blend of drama, comedy, heartwarming moments and true artistic talent. Following season 12, a fan favorite, audiences had high hopes for season 13. Ultimately, however, the latest installment was unable to live up to its potential. Despite the talent of the drag queen contestants, the stylistic and structural production of this season was notably lackluster.


Student Spotlight: Matt Haughey ‘21 releases his original music on Spotify

(05/06/21 6:03am)

In his four years in Hanover, singer-songwriter Matt Haughey ’21 of Madison, New Jersey has been an active contributor to Dartmouth's music and performing arts scene. Since his freshman year, he has been a member of the Dartmouth Cords — one of three all-male a cappella groups on campus — as well as the Dog Day Players improv group. More recently, Haughey has made his emergence onto the national stage: In the last two years, he has released five singles that have garnered over a million streams on Spotify. 



Does absence really make the heart grow fonder?

(05/05/21 6:10am)

Being in a long-distance relationship is difficult. Being in a long-distance relationship in college — with social, academic and extracurricular pressures — can be even harder. Maintaining a long-distance relationship in college during a pandemic? One might say that would seem impossible. But for many students, both at Dartmouth and beyond, keeping their loved one close despite the distance has proven to be a surmountable obstacle. 


Black Students React to Dartmouth’s Response to the Chauvin Verdict

(05/05/21 6:05am)

Nearly a year after the death of George Floyd, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was convicted of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Following the verdict, Native American studies program chair Bruce Duthu ’80  moderated a faculty-led panel titled “The Chauvin Verdict: A Community Discussion on Race, Crime & Justice.” Additionally, College President Phil Hanlon, Dean of the College Kathryn Lively and various campus organizations released email statements regarding the Chauvin verdict. 



Editors' Note

(05/05/21 6:00am)

One thing the pandemic has given us is time. With many of our usual social and extracurricular activities put on hold, this past year has felt like somewhat of a twilight zone; time is passing around us, but our day-to-day lives move at a speed akin to running in a dream — time feels thick and resistant. Extra, undefined hours can sometimes be overwhelming, especially when our usual pastimes aren’t available. However, these extra hours have also given us time to think. The kind of thinking time we only get while taking a long, hot shower or on a solo run. This week at Mirror, we are taking some time to think and reflect. 


Dartmouth Innovation Accelerator for Cancer Awards $300,000 Prize For Novel Cancer Therapeutic

(05/05/21 6:15am)

At the end of 2020, the Magnuson Center for Entrepreneurship partnered with the Norris Cotton Cancer Center at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center to launch the Dartmouth Innovations Accelerator for Cancer, an initiative seeking to reduce the time it takes for cancer therapies to come to market. Teams accepted into the Accelerator took a 10-week course in drug and medical device product development. Following the course, each team developed a pitch for their cancer-related innovation, and an external review panel decided which teams were ready to receive funding for their innovation. 


Controversial state bills face pushback from Dartmouth community

(05/04/21 6:05am)

During the 2021 New Hampshire legislative session, Hanover’s representatives cast votes in April on two controversial bills — H.B. 2 and H.B. 111. All four of Hanover’s representatives voted against H.B. 2, a state budget bill that contains a controversial amendment prohibiting state contractors and schools from teaching about concepts like systemic racism and sexism. Two Hanover representatives, including government professor Russell Muirhead, voted against H.B. 111, which would repeal “official immunity,” the legal principle that protects public employees from legal liability for actions undertaken in good faith.