David Kung


Articles

College celebrates late Homecoming

Dartmouth's annual Homecoming celebration -- which usually takes place during mid-October -- was pushed back this year for one reason: to accommodate a better football game. Football games are scheduled almost a decade in advance by the Athletics Office, but Homecoming is scheduled by Alumni Relations. Director of Alumni Relations David Orr said his office tries to build Homecoming around "what appears to be the most important Ivy League game." Associate Director of Athletics Josie Harper said both offices try to coordinate a good match for the Homecoming game -- "either Yale or Harvard, generally speaking" -- although the final decision has more to do with scheduling dates than who is a good team to play. Harvard University was a good choice because Harvard is the closest Ivy to Dartmouth and "we have the best chance to have an exciting atmosphere and a good crowd," Harper said. Orr said choosing the date for this year's Homecoming was rather simple. "Look at the games we played," he said.


CDs, pen, watch stolen from Lord

The Hanover Police are investigating a break-in through the ground floor room in Lord Hall that occurred sometime between last Saturday night and Sunday morning. Approximately $1800 was reported stolen to the police in the form of 80 to 90 compact discs, stamps, a gold plated pen and a watch case. Detective-Sergeant Frank Moran said the break-in was reported to have occurred between 11 p.m.



Ex-Topside manager to plead guilty

The former manager of the Topside convenience store in Thayer Hall intends to plead guilty to charges he embezzled about $30,000 from the College, according to documents filed this month at Grafton Superior Court. Bob Jette, who was fired earlier this year, now awaits a court hearing.




Jewelry stolen from Home Decor

Hanover Police are trying to determine who broke into the Home Decor Shop and stole assorted jewelry items sometime between late Wednesday night and early Thursday morning.


College supports numerous student-performance groups

A glance at the shows advertised on the Hopkins Center marquee and campus bulletin boards reveals that the College's many artistic students seem to always be on stage. With its funding, facilities and supportive faculty, the College provides an environment which encourages students to try out for existing groups, create new ensembles and plan performances. Dartmouth students have been directing their own plays, arranging a cappella music, choreographing dance and entertaining the community since the early 1800s. Hop Performing Ensembles The Hopkins Center sponsors nine student performing groups: the Barbary Coast Jazz Ensemble, the Chamber Singers, the Glee Club, the Handel Society, the Gospel Choir, the Symphony Orchestra, the Marching Band, the Wind Symphony and the World Music Percussion Ensemble. All of the ensembles are formed through auditions held mainly in the Fall term. Because the ensemble groups are sponsored and funded by the Hopkins Center, student direction in the group varies widely from the mostly student-run Marching Band to those run "more like professional" groups with the director or conductor picking the repertoire. The Barbary Coast specializes in music of the American jazz tradition and performs once each term with a selected guest jazz artist who stays at the College for a week. The Barbary Coast is moderately sized with about 20 members and is directed by Music Professor Don Glasgo.


Arts

'Brave Old World' delights audience

"Brave Old World" brought a delightful combination of the old and new in Yiddish concert music to the Dartmouth stage last night. Their vocal and instrumental concert at Spaulding Auditorium was a vibrant combination of both classical artistry and jazz improvisation with some daring innovation.


Wright appointed new provost

Acting Provost James Wright accepted permanent appointment as provost last week -- just in time to direct the library expansion and guide the searches for two professional school deans. Wright, who has been serving as acting provost since January, was appointed to his new position without going though a search committee.