Colin Barry


Articles

The D: Dartmouth's premier school of journalism

Five hours every day. That's how long the offices on the second floor of Robinson Hall are quiet when The Dartmouth is in production. The rest of the time -- from 7 a.m., when carriers arrive to begin deliveries, until 2 a.m., when the last night editor leaves -- students are working to put out "The D," the campus' only daily source of news and opinion. Founded in 1799 by a student group that included Daniel Webster (Class of 1801), The Dartmouth is the oldest college newspaper in the United States.



Arts

Four one-acts set to take Nathan's Garden by storm

Nathan's Garden, a quiet, spacious park at the intersection of Maple Street and Downing Road, may play host to more than an occasional birdwatcher this weekend. The Displaced Theater Company's summer production, consisting of four one-act plays tied together by original monologue, is set to run on Friday, Saturday and Sunday in the garden, weather permitting. The plays will follow "one convoluted but interesting train of thought throughout the whole performance," according to Cole Entress '06, one of five actors.


Dean spends last stint as fellow backing Kerry

Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean sat down with The Dartmouth on Aug. 5 to discuss the upcoming presidential race, the state of the American left and his own personal plans for the future. In an interview, Dean said he would fully dedicate himself to Democratic nominee John Kerry's campaign for the next three months leading up to the presidential election. "I'm going to do pretty much whatever [Kerry] asks," Dean said, including raising money and traveling on behalf of the Kerry-Edwards campaign. During the Democratic primary season last winter, Dean ran a hard-nosed campaign and had been critical of Kerry's positions on several issues, including the war in Iraq and health care coverage for poor Americans. However, Dean dismissed such disparities as immaterial to his present support for Kerry. "The policy differences between me and Kerry are really tiny compared to the policy differences between me and George Bush," Dean said. After his defeat in the primaries, Dean has thrown much of his energy into Democracy for America, a grassroots liberal organization that draws much of its leadership and support from the ranks of former Dean organizers. The former governor said he hopes Democracy for America will address the Democratic Party's inability to craft an effective grassroots movement in the past 20 years. "Republicans have been successful at the grassroots because they know who they are," Dean said.



Some sophomores choose to leave campus for summer

Since the implementation of the Dartmouth Plan some 30 years ago, the vast majority of sophomores at the College have spent their summers in Hanover, enjoying what many regard as the least challenging term at Dartmouth.


Dean spends first day as visiting fellow

Former Vermont Governor Howard Dean offered his thoughts on campaigning and policy issues in the first of several planned summer visits to the College on Tuesday.


Stronger economy improves '04 job prospects

As the nation's economy rallies and business confidence continues to grow, this year's graduating class will leave Dartmouth with substantially rosier prospects for the future than College alumni of the past several years. Dartmouth Career Services officials assessed the job market as "good and getting better" -- important to the probable majority of graduating seniors who plan to join the working world soon after commencement.



Curley credits alumni contacts in his job search

A few short days after his commencement, Michael Curley '04 will leave Hanover behind for Washington, D.C., and a job at a real estate consulting firm. "I start two weeks after graduation, so right away I have to think about getting a place to live and moving," Curley said. Curley described the job market as still very tough, recalling that he participated in numerous resume drops and interviews before getting an employment offer.