Arts


Q&A with studio art professor and architect Zenovia Toloudi

Studio art professor Zenovia Toloudi’s “Technoutopias” series is currently on display in the Jaffe-Friede and Strauss Galleries, located in the Hopkins Center. An architect and artist, Toloudi explores the interactions, or lack thereof, between humans and public spaces in her current exhibit. ...


Arts

Student Spotlight: Adam Riegler ’20 a director with an acting past

October 17, 2019 6:15pm

Before coming to the woods of New Hampshire for college, Adam Riegler ’20 found his love for theater on some of the biggest stages in New York. From acting on Broadway to directing at Dartmouth, Riegler’s upcoming show “Red Speedo,” which will premiere on a Dartmouth stage on Nov. 15, will draw on his lifetime of experience with theater.


Arts

Review: 'The Politician' has promise, does not deliver

October 17, 2019 5:11pm

Everyone can enjoy watching a teenager who’s struggling with an identity crisis on TV. What’s not so fun to watch is a show that itself is struggling with an identity crisis. “The Politician” is striving for the former, but has ended up with the latter. The result is a show having an identity crisis about a gaggle of teens who are similarly confused.


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Arts

First women on campus featured in film on coeducation

October 17, 2019 12:23pm

It is not a well-known fact that Dartmouth hosted a small cohort of women exchange students starting in 1968 before its official inception as a coeducational institution in the fall of 1972. In recent years, Dartmouth has nearly equal numbers of women and men, a norm that is in part due to these trailblazers who made the first incursions onto Dartmouth’s all-male campus and shaped Dartmouth into the school it is today.


Arts

Review: 'Norman F—ing Rockwell' balances style and substance

October 14, 2019 11:01pm

“Norman F—ing Rockwell!” is easily Lana Del Rey’s best work to date. Upon its reveal, the cover art of “NFR!” created a considerable amount of controversy within Lana Del Rey’s fanbase. While her previous covers all use similar bold fonts for the title of the album and feature cinematic images of Del Rey alone with a car and wearing white, conservative outfits, “NFR!” goes in a different direction. 


Arts

Review: Netflix’s ‘Big Mouth’ shares what growing up means today

October 14, 2019 11:01pm

I’ve followed Netflix’s animated series “Big Mouth” since it debuted in 2017. I’ve loved every minute of it since, including its third season, which was released on Oct. 4. But I know that it rubs some people the wrong way, and I can see why it does. The sexual jokes are blatant and graphic — which can feel especially inappropriate considering that the characters are middle schoolers — and visually, the show is a tad more grotesque than your typical animation. 


Arts

Review: ‘Cherry’ by Nico Walker an honest story of addiction

October 10, 2019 3:11pm

It’s strange to say, but I did not notice the narrator had no name the entire time I was reading Nico Walker’s novel “Cherry.” It was only when I sat down to write this review that I realized the person whose deepest thoughts I had been reading was unnamed to me, however fictional or autobiographical he may be. “Cherry” quickly became a nationwide sensation, debuting on the New York Times best seller list immediately after its release in 2018. Currently serving a prison sentence for bank robbery, Walker wrote his novel behind bars and is on track to be released in 2020.


Arts

Review: 'Joker' fails to live up to its artistic aspirations

October 7, 2019 6:26pm

“Joker” is not the most boring film I’ve seen all year. Nor is it the most poorly made. Nevertheless, “Joker” is probably the worst film I’ve seen in 2019, or at least the one I despised the most.  Indeed, the fact that it is neither boring nor poorly made ultimately ends up highlighting the stark divide between the film’s artistic ambitions and the shallow execution of the story it thinks it’s trying to tell. 


Arts

UChicago professor speaks at Hood on intersection of art and race

October 7, 2019 6:52pm

What is contemporary art? For some, it’s Pollocks and Picassos and Poliakoffs. For others, it is the senseless combination of shape and color. For University of Chicago art history professor Darby English, it’s a conversation.  Last Thursday, students, faculty and members of the Hanover community gathered to hear English speak in the Hood Museum of Art’s Gilman Auditorium for the annual Dr. Allen Root Contemporary Art Distinguished Lectureship, a forum established in 2004 that focuses on celebrating and educating the community about modern art through a variety of lenses.


Arts

Review: ‘Once Upon a Time...in Hollywood’ an affectionate satire

October 3, 2019 6:30pm

Welcome to 1969 Hollywood. Retro buildings, vintage cars and neon signs line Hollywood Boulevard. Men dress in bell bottoms, patterned shirts and turtlenecks with blazers. Women wear miniskirts and vinyl, knee-high boots. Flower children don bohemian outfits of the counterculture movement. The Quentin Tarantino-directed movie “Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood” pictures these vintage scenes through rose-colored glasses. 


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Arts

‘The Politics of Pink’ explores notions of femininity, fragility

October 16, 2019 4:45pm

When someone mentions the word “pink,” what images come to mind? Maybe you picture a little baby girl in her light-pink nursery, pink-frosted gender-reveal cakes or the new millennial pink that covers dorm rooms and stores across the country. Whatever you think of, it is most likely related to girls and traditional femininity. 


Arts

Review: ‘Hustlers’ exemplifies female reclamation of power

September 30, 2019 9:13pm

“Doesn’t money make you horny?” Ramona (portrayed by Jennifer Lopez) whispers this to newcomer Destiny (portrayed by Constance Wu), as she leaves center stage, bathed in dollar bills. In the film “Hustlers,” Ramona immediately establishes the primary foundation of the film: the intertwined web of money and sex. 


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Arts

Student Spotlight: Joelle Park '19 applies her creativity in film

September 30, 2019 8:53pm

Maybe you have seen her give a tour of her dorm on YouTube or heard about her stint on the red carpet of the Video Music Awards this summer. Joelle Park ’19, who is in her final term at Dartmouth, is by all accounts zealous and innovative — founding and maintaining her own Youtube channel titled “Joelle,” which has over seven thousand subscribers, is just the start.


Arts

Review: "It: Chapter 2" surpasses prequel in thrill and quality

September 26, 2019 5:54pm

As a Dartmouth student, the end of summer can be a pretty lonely time. With almost all other colleges starting the last week of August, the stretch between when home friends leave to the journey back to Hanover can be a slow and painful one. I am on campus now, of course ­­— and it would be an understatement to say that my schedule is just a bit chaotic — but when I lived in a ghost town for those couple weeks, I had nothing but free time. 


Arts

Review: Ford v Ferrari has great acting, dampened by predictable plot

September 25, 2019 7:18pm

It’s hard not to enjoy certain moments of pure thrill — the rapid descent of a rollercoaster, maybe, or a hard-won victory on the athletic field. Director James Mangold’s new film, “Ford v Ferrari,” draws upon one of such thrills: the roar and rush of high-speed driving. Shown at Dartmouth’s Hopkins Center for the Arts as part of the annual Telluride Film Festival screenings, “Ford v Ferrari” is a riveting piece of car-focused filmmaking wrapped up in an underwhelming but ultimately solid narrative envelope. 


Arts

Sankofa Danzafro tells story of Afro-Colombians through dance

September 25, 2019 7:43pm

Tonight and Friday night, the Sankofa Danzafro dance troupe will perform its show “The City of Others” in the Moore Theater at the Hopkins Center at 7:30 p.m. Through the art of dance and music, “The City of Others” tells the powerful story of young Afro-Colombians who are struggling to combat the historical legacy of slavery and racism in Colombia.


Arts

Review: Netflix’s new film ‘Tall Girl’ aims high, falls short

September 23, 2019 6:58pm

Netflix’s “Tall Girl” is a film that I will carry in my heart forever. I have never in my life felt such burning hatred for a movie before, and for setting that record — for teaching me that I am capable of hating a medium of art that I love so dearly — “Tall Girl” is special to me. 


Arts

Review: Taylor Swift’s ‘Lover’ tells stories of love and loss

September 19, 2019 7:28pm

Taylor Swift. The name of one of America’s most successful musicians conjures up images of cowgirl boots, sparkly dresses, Twitter feuds and boyfriends. Often the mere mention of Swift induces a chorus of eyerolls or sighs of disgust. Very rarely do conversations about Swift mention her enormous success as a musician, including the fact that her most recent album “Lover” became 2019’s best-selling record in just a week.