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The Dartmouth
May 27, 2024 | Latest Issue
The Dartmouth

Before the Curtain: Arts on Campus Week 5

Arts events on campus this week feature the Hopkins Center’s New Music Festival, film screenings, a Hood gallery tour and performances at Sawtooth Kitchen.

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Friday, April 19

At 2 p.m. in North Fairbanks Hall, the Hopkins Center for the Arts will kick off the 2024 New Musical Festival with an installation by Mac Waters, an award-winning multimedia composer and improvisor. Waters’s work explores the interplay between collective memory and nostalgia, with a focus on virtual and extended realities, internet cultures, subcultures, queerness and digital medievalism. His project, “TikTokBox” will improvise a distorted version of a TikTok “For You Page” — TikTok’s main content feed — in real time, while investigating the prevalence of a mass sociogenic disorder known as “TikTok tics.” The event, which will be followed by a discussion and a Q&A, is free and unticketed. 

At 6 p.m. on Allen Street, the Hopkins Center and the Town of Hanover will host a headliner concert featuring BOOMscat — a Washington, D.C.-based R&B duo — and Kokayi, a Grammy Award-nominated improvisational vocalist, author and producer from Columbus, Ohio. The event, which is also part of the New Music Festival, is free and unticketed. 

At 7 p.m. in Loew Auditorium, the Hopkins Center will screen “Out of Darkness.” The survival thriller from director Andrew Cumming follows a Stone Age tribe that is being hunted by a monstrous entity. Featuring an atmospheric setting and “unusually rich soundscape,” according to the film’s promotional materials, the film takes audience members back in time to the prehistoric era. A discussion with anthropology professors Jeremy DeSilva, Nathaniel Dominy, Raquel Fleskesand Zaneta Thayer will follow the screening. Tickets cost $8 and can be purchased on the Hop website or at the box office. 

At 9 p.m., New Hampshire country, rock and bluegrass group The Dobros will perform at Sawtooth Kitchen. Tickets are $5 and can be purchased on Sawtooth’s website. 

Saturday, April 20

At 1 p.m. in Loew Auditorium, the Hopkins Center will screen a recorded performance of Giacomo Puccini’s “La Rondine” from the Metropolitan Opera. Set in Paris and on the French Riviera, the opera chronicles a love affair between the courtesan Magda, played by soprano Angel Blue, and Ruggero, an earnest young man played by tenor Jonathan Tetelman. Tickets start at $22 and can be purchased on the Hop website or at the box office. 

At 2 p.m., the Hood Museum of Art will host the “Hood Highlights Tour,” a guided, in-person viewing of its galleries. The event is free and no registration is required.

At 3 p.m. in Rollins Chapel, the Hopkins Center will invite Charles Peoples III to perform “TechniTerra: A Sonic Transmission” — an “immersive sonic experience” that combines vocals, performance, technology and custom-built instruments, as part of the New Music Festival. The event is free and unticketed.

At 6 p.m. in Baker Berry Library and the Hopkins Center will co-host another installment of the 2024 New Music Festival — a performance by award-winning composer Rodrigo Martinez Torres GR. He will perform his piece, “A Palace in Time,” which he composed for the Electromagnetic Monochord, an instrument of his own creation. The event is free and unticketed. 

From 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Sawtooth Kitchen, Vermont-based electronic folk duo Sandiland and Vincent will perform a show, which is free with dinner. 

At 7 p.m. in Loew Auditorium, the Hopkins Center will host a screening of “British Arrows,” a compilation of ads that won the eponymous award — which celebrate creativity in video advertising. The ads, which range in tone from dramatic to comedic, feature stars such as Miley Cyrus, Scarlett Johanssson, Colin Jost and Sylvester Stallone. Tickets start at $10 and can be purchased on the Hop’s website or at the box office. 

At 9:30 p.m. at Sawtooth Kitchen, DJ Sonicc Blush will host an afterparty for the Hopkins Center’s New Music Festival. The event is free and open to the public. 

Sunday, April 21

At 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. in Dartmouth Hall 105, the Hopkins Center will host 23 Skidoo and The Secret Agency as they put on a family-friendly interactive hip-hop  experience. Grammy-winning artist and “King of Kid-Hop” 23 Skidoo combines rap, reggae and soul music with science fiction storytelling for an unforgettable afternoon. Tickets start at $25 and can be purchased on the Hop’s website or at the box office. 

At 4 p.m. in Loew Auditorium, the Hopkins Center will screen “Common Ground,” an environmental documentary directed by Rebecca and Jock Tickell that urges viewers to be aware of hazardous farming practices and advocates for the growing regenerative agriculture movement. The screening is free and unticketed. 

Thursday, April 25

At 5 p.m., the Hood Museum, Dartmouth Dialogue Project, Center for Social Impact, Institute for Black Intellectual and Cultural Life and Leslie Center for the Humanities — alongside the African and African American studies, art history and studio art departments — will jointly host “Personalizing Mass Incarceration: Exploring American Justice and Injustice,” an artist talk with Titus Kaphar. Four works from Kaphar’s “Jerome Project” are currently on display as part of the Hood’s “Gilded” exhibit. Kaphar will discuss his artistic inspirations, as well as the personal experiences that motivated him to confront racial injustice and criminalization in his work. The event is open to the public and will be followed by a reception in the Russo Atrium. 

At 7 p.m. in Loew Auditorium, the Hopkins Center will host a screening of “When My Sleeping Dragon Woke,” a documentary about the creative process behind Tony Award-winning playwright Sharon Washington ’81’s one-woman play, “Feeding the Dragon.” The documentary follows Washington as she brings the play to life while confronting her childhood and relationship with her parents. A discussion with Washington, director Chuck Schultz and theater professor Monica Ndounou will follow the screening. Tickets start at $12 and can be purchased on the Hop’s website or at the box office. 

At 7 p.m., folk quartet Never Too Late will perform in the Sawtooth Kitchen listening room. Tickets are $10 and should be purchased ahead of time on Sawtooth’s website due to limitations.