Search Results


Use the fields below to perform an advanced search of The Dartmouth 's archives. This will return articles, images, and multimedia relevant to your query.




1000 items found for your search. If no results were found please broaden your search.



Retrospective on DMX, a talented rapper and a troubled man

(04/26/21 6:00am)

Earl Simmons, better known by his stage name DMX, clawed his way from the streets of Yonkers to hip-hop fame with his guttural voice and signature barking adlibs. He commanded an emotional rawness that few rappers in the early bling era of hip-hop could channel. However, Simmons struggled with his demons — battling drug addiction throughout his career. Following complications from a drug overdose, he died on April 9, at the age of 50.


Q&A: English and creative writing professor Joshua Bennett on winning the Whiting Award

(04/22/21 6:00am)

Every year, ten of the most promising voices in literature receive the Whiting Award, a prize that Vanity Fair has dubbed the “crystal ball of the literature world” for its tendency to go to up-and-coming writers early in their careers. Past winners have gone on to receive other prestigious awards including the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. On April 14, English and creative writing professor Joshua Bennett won the award for his work in both poetry and nonfiction.


The D-Constructed Cook: Student Cooking Survival Guide

(04/19/21 6:05am)

Students often demean Dartmouth Dining Services for its quality, but DDS is undeniably convenient and reliable. However, the pandemic has increased the number of students living off campus while restricting DDS to students in dorms. No longer can off-campus students, like myself, walk to the dining hall after a long day of classes. We are out in the real world to fend — and cook — for ourselves.


Review: “The Serpent” muddles a gripping story, doesn’t give enough to chew on

(04/19/21 6:00am)

Over the past few years, Netflix has capitalized on people’s fascination with the macabre. From the 2015 hit “Making a Murderer” to “Conversations with a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes,” “The Ripper” and then this year’s “Crime Scene: The Vanishing at the Cecil Hotel,” recent Netflix originals have focused on a darker side of human nature. On April 2, this trend continued with “The Serpent.”


Review: 'Generation' explores the complexities of the modern teenage experience

(04/15/21 6:00am)

Whenever I walk into a party, I can’t help but ask myself how each person is experiencing the party themselves — the couple in the back curled into an embrace, the gaggle of girls infused by music, their hair a silky blur; a half-drunk group with hands raised as a pong ball sinks into stinky froth. In the colored lights and thrumming bass of a party, it’s practically impossible to see anyone clearly — to see the world through the eyes of those disguised by makeup and alcohol and fake smiles. 



Student Spotlight: Lexi Warden ’21 explores identity as director of ‘Bulrusher’

(04/12/21 6:05am)

Lexi Warden ’21’s final curtain call at Dartmouth will not be on a physical stage, where she usually makes her appearances, but broadcast over the radio. For the past two years, Warden has been working with theater professor Monica White Ndounou on her thesis project, a radio adaptation of Eisa Davis’s 2007 Pulitzer finalist play “Bulrusher.” 


Alum Spotlight: Kensington Cochran ’20 explores trauma through art

(04/12/21 6:00am)

Last week, the Hood Museum of Art hosted recent graduate Kensington Cochran ’20 for its second talk in the “Virtual Space for Dialogue” series. At the talk, Cochran presented a collection she curated as the Hood’s Conroy Intern last year that explores the intersection between art and trauma. 



Review: “Cherry” a fanciful adaptation of an honest book about addiction

(04/05/21 6:05am)

“Cherry” by Nico Walker, while refreshingly candid and meaningful in book form, suffers from its prolonged length and an overreliance on tropes in its adaptation to the big-screen. The directors, brothers Anthony and Joe Russo, clearly tried to create something profound out of Walker’s sincere story, yet the two-and-a-half hour film ended up cheesy nonetheless. Every moment in the film is self-conscious, hindering the genuine story from shining through.


The D-Constructed Cook: Soondubu Jjigae

(04/05/21 6:00am)

Cooking Korean food can be intimidating, especially for a beginner cook. Not only can it be difficult to identify the ingredients necessary for a particular recipe, but figuring out how to use each one can also be intimidating. For those looking for an accessible dish to start with, soondubu jjigae is a great introduction to Korean flavors and ingredients and is especially satisfying at this time of year. While it’s still relatively cold out, I love sipping on this warm and spicy broth and feeling satiated after a meal — without feeling overstuffed. When fresh spring vegetables are not yet available, I often resort to pantry staples to cook my favorite Korean dish, and I urge any beginner cook to explore this dish as well.


“The Radical Joy Project” frees student creative spirits via a collaborative multimedia performance

(04/01/21 6:00am)

“The Radical Joy Project” is a mixed media student performance series showcasing a wide range of art forms including music, theater and dance. The project seeks to convey the joy and liberation that art can bring, through singing, acting and dancing. In three parts — “The Past,” “The Present” and “The Future” — the performance explores the overarching theme of joy, with a focus on finding joy in the current trying times. The series is set to premiere on April 8 and 9 at 8 p.m. on the Hopkins Center for the Arts's Youtube channel. 


Recording Academy made smart, unsurprising decisions at 2021 Grammy Awards

(03/29/21 6:00am)

The 63rd annual Grammy Awards, which took place on March 14th, marked the continuation of this year’s socially distanced award season. Unlike the Golden Globes a few weeks ago, the Recording Academy chose to hold its ceremony outdoors where it could host nominees in person. The format worked well, making the ceremony feel more like a normal, pre-COVID event. 



Review: ‘WandaVision’ takes Marvel in fresh new direction

(03/09/21 7:00am)

Martin Scorsese once said that Marvel movies were more akin to theme parks than cinema — a claim that drew the ire of many passionate nerds who rushed to the defense of the $22 billion grossing franchise. His rationale was that the films were predictable and didn’t convey the unique emotional and psychological experiences of its characters in the way that he believes true cinema does. 


78th Golden Globes kicks off awards season with socially distanced audience, technical difficulties

(03/04/21 7:09am)

On Sunday, the 78th Golden Globe Awards began the strangest awards season in recent memory. The ceremony was held mostly virtually, with half taking place in New York and half in Los Angeles. Instead of the usual array of celebrities, the in-person audience was made up entirely of socially distanced first responders and essential workers, while the nominees all teleconferenced in. 


Dance Heginbotham premieres newest installment in '24 Caprices' project

(03/04/21 7:00am)

On Feb. 22, contemporary dance company Dance Heginbotham and violinist Colin Jacobsen took to Hop@Home to share the world premiere of Caprices #5 and #6 — the two latest installments in the ensemble’s “24 Caprices” series. Throughout the pandemic, the project has sought to explore each entry of composer Niccolò Paganini's “24 Caprices for Solo Violin.” 




Student Spotlight: Kevin Soraci ’18 finds beauty in the mundane in ‘The Comforts of Home’

(02/25/21 7:10am)

Studio art intern Kevin Soraci ’18 seeks to find beauty in the ordinary. Soraci’s exhibition “The Comforts of Home,” currently displayed in the Barrows Rotunda of the Hopkins Center for the Arts, features paintings of scenes from everyday life, capturing a space that can feel both familiar and peculiar.




Advertise your student group in The Dartmouth for free!