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Lamenting Late Night

(4 hours ago)

Dartmouth Dining Services has had to make a number of adjustments due to the pandemic, most notably to the beloved late-night food program. Collis Cafe late night, which was originally shut down after the start of the pandemic in March, has not made a return, leaving students with the Hop Courtyard Cafe and Novack Cafe as the primary places on campus to get food at night. 



“This Campus is Haunted to Me”: Class of 2024 Reflects on Grief and Loss

(4 hours ago)

After a tumultuous 18 months, Dartmouth returned to near normalcy in September. In-person classes resumed, dining halls opened to full capacity and campus began to feel alive again after being in a long hibernation. However, for many ’24s, the tragedies of this past year have hit particularly hard — and made it harder to shift to a normal they never knew. 


“Empathy is the Starting Point”: Human Centered Design Minor Teaches Problem Solving Through a Human Lens

(4 hours ago)

When considering Dartmouth’s “must-take” classes, it seems ENGS 12, “Design Thinking” always tops the list. Over 100 students enroll in the course each year, and over 100 additional students are still sent to a waitlist, according to Engineering professor Peter Robbie, who . described the class as “a foundational course in creativity.” While ENGS 12 is a quintessential course even for non-engineering majors, it also serves as a core course for the human centered design minor, which, according to the minor’s webpage, focuses on “the process of innovation for addressing human needs.” I sat down with Robbie and two current human centered design students to explore one of Dartmouth’s most unique programs. 


Editors’ Note

(4 hours ago)

It’s a weird time at Dartmouth: Fall foliage is post-peak, the usual sunny blue sky has been masked by grey clouds and we’re at the lull before the second round of midterms. At night, the humid air creates a murky haze over the lampposts that light the Green, replicating an eerie horror-movie scene. This weekend is also Halloween, which perhaps contributes to the unsettling nature of this week. 


More Employees, Please

(10/20/21 6:15am)

Longer wait times, skyrocketing prices, more limited menu offerings — across the nation, this is the new reality for restaurant-goers. The entire food service industry is struggling with the lingering effects of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, with issues such as labor shortages and supply chain disruption impacting the industry in numerous ways. In a survey conducted by Alignable with small and medium-sized business owners, 85% of restaurant owners said it was “very difficult” to find staff, and only 3% said they weren’t struggling to hire. 


Hello From the Other Side: Reflecting on Rush

(10/20/21 6:05am)

For many Dartmouth students, Greek life provides a space for them to connect with people outside of their normal circles on campus. Joining Greek life can make the College feel smaller and less overwhelming — especially after a year spent behind masks and on Zoom. This fall specifically, sorority rush was an important kind of mass introduction for a large portion of Dartmouth students. 



Norwich Farmers Market: It’s a Big Dill

(10/20/21 6:10am)

In New England, the autumn leaves are most certainly “falling down like pieces into place,” as Taylor Swift sings in “All Too Well.” The Norwich Farmers Market in Vermont is a fabulous fall excursion: This outdoor market has several vendors selling products ranging from fresh produce to skincare items to coffee. The environment is incredibly welcoming and visitors leave with delicious goodies and special memories.


Editors' Note

(10/20/21 6:00am)

Blink and you’ll miss it — another Dartmouth term has passed its halfway point. And after a week-long, unseasonal warm spell, we’ve finally made our way into the chilly mid-October mornings that are oh-so-typical of New England fall. And you know what else is oh-so-typical? The ever-persistent cold that is passing through campus and the mid-week slump that seems to have its hold on so many of us. But it’s not too late to reignite that spark! 


On the Topic of Tenure

(10/13/21 6:11am)

During course election this fall, I was entirely preoccupied with figuring out how the timetable worked and deciding whether I truly wanted to take Spanish at 7:45 in the morning. The farthest thing from my thoughts was whether the professors who would be teaching me had tenure or not, but for those enmeshed in academia, standing for tenure is often one of the most pivotal moments in their careers. 


Much Ado About Greek Life

(10/13/21 6:25am)

On my official Dartmouth tour, there seemed to be an odd trend: Some beautiful, classical buildings (or houses, I’d almost immediately learn) were taboos my tour guide danced around — “Here is Foco, short for Food Court! We sure love slang here at Dartmouth! Kindly ignore that building with fancy ancient letters!” Yes, the Dartmouth administration — and, by extension, Dartmouth tour guides — seemed to operate with a collective hushed embarrassment regarding not just the existence, but the dominance of Greek life on campus. For an institution that comprises such a massive part of student life, should Greek life not be a selling point for admissions’ advertising strategies?


Editors' Note

(10/13/21 6:00am)

This past week has marked many firsts, and also many lasts. It was the first time that the ’24s and ’25s participated in the cult-like tradition of the Homecoming bonfire and felt the warmth of its extraordinary flames. For many ’24s, it was their first weekend of being affiliated with Greek organizations. It was also the first time that the many members of the classes of ’21 and ’20 came back to campus post-graduation. And for the ’22s, this weekend was the first of many lasts — our last bonfire as undergraduates. It’s not always easy for these important moments to sink in. But even if we aren’t able to appreciate them in the moment, we always have the memories to look back on. 


The Future of Capitalism, From the Classroom

(10/13/21 6:15am)

“Pretty much any contemporary problem is going to be better understood in a multidisciplinary context,” said public policy professor Charlie Wheelan, one of three professors co-teaching GOVT 68, “The Future of Capitalism” this term. The course is taught by professors of three different academic specialties — government, economics and public policy — and takes advantage of its unique teaching set-up to explore the pros and cons of capitalism through the lens of multiple disciplines.


21F, Across the Pond

(10/13/21 6:20am)

As traditions are restored, friendships are rekindled and in-person classes are reinstated, the beginning of 21F marks Dartmouth’s return to a semi-normal campus. This historically significant term has afforded unique opportunities for connecting — and reconnecting — to Dartmouth’s community, not only for Dartmouth’s freshman but for all returning students. 


The View from Halfway Done: One Junior’s Take on the Passing of Time

(10/13/21 6:05am)

I am halfway through my time at Dartmouth and halfway through 21F, and the glass is looking half full. I wake up to an open window in my off-campus home and a view of green leaves, I make coffee and eggs and finish up the odd reading for one of my government classes, and I get to feel the brisk October air on my face as I laugh with my friend on our way to computer science every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. 




Behind the ‘Gram, Ivy the ‘Lab-rarian’ and Dartmouth’s Academic Juggernauts

(10/06/21 6:20am)

At first glance, the Dartmouth Library Instagram account could be mistaken for an unofficial,  student-run page. Scrolling through the posts, photos of ‘Lab-rarian’ Ivy — the unofficial mascot of the library — complement helpful infographics about library resources and images of students hard at work, captioned with peculiar family-friendly derivations of the popularly used student phrase “academic weapons.” Favorite derivations include academic “harmonizing yodelers” and “sole survivors of lost whaling ships.” 





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