Megh Duwadi


Articles

As Long As We Remember

It was the third day of Senior Week, at that instant when Dartmouth pushed aside its staidness for the 10-day tented carnival of Commencement and Reunion, when I ran into a freshman preparing to embark on her first three-month break from the Hanover Plain. "Have a great summer," I said, generically enough, directing the oral version of a cliche yearbook message to someone I only tangentially knew at Dartmouth and didn't expect to see again -- regularly, at least -- in my post-grad life. As an aside, I added, "Enjoy your next three years here." "Don't say that," she said.


The D: Dartmouth's premier school of journalism

Six hours every day. That's how long the offices on the second floor of Robinson Hall are quiet when The Dartmouth is in production. The rest of the time -- from 7 a.m., when carriers arrive to begin deliveries, until 1 a.m., when the last night editor leaves -- students are working to put out "The D," the campus' only daily source of news and opinion. Founded in 1799 by a student group that included Daniel Webster (Class of 1801), The Dartmouth is the oldest college newspaper in the United States.


FORMER COLLEGE PRESIDENT McLAUGHLIN DIES

David T. McLaughlin, a member of the Class of 1954 who, as Dartmouth's 14th president, oversaw a campus-wide building boom and enacted fundamental changes in the Dartmouth Plan, died Wednesday morning in Dillingham, Alaska's Woodriver Lodge while on a fishing trip with friends and his two grown sons. The cause of McLaughlin's death was not immediately clear, although several people close to the retired president said he died of natural causes in his sleep.


FORMER COLLEGE PRESIDENT McLAUGHLIN DIES

WEB UPDATE -- Aug. 25, 9:49 p.m. David T. McLaughlin, a member of the Class of 1954 who, as Dartmouth's 14th president, oversaw a campus-wide building boom and enacted fundamental changes in the Dartmouth Plan, died Wednesday morning in the wilderness of Alaska while on a fishing trip with friends and his two grown sons. The cause of McLaughlin's death was not immediately clear, although several people close to the retired president, who was 72, said he died of natural causes. McLaughlin suffered a heart attack during the first year of his term and had a history of heart trouble, but was not generally regarded as being in poor health. He was president from 1981 to 1987, and was known for a corporate approach to the job that was both a source of outside praise, particularly among alumni impressed with his fundraising prowess, as well as faculty criticism. Indeed, McLaughlin's resume read largely like a roadmap through some of the most prominent destinations in corporate America.


Dean energy infuses campus

Dartmouth summers -- even those that lie only months away from a hot presidential primary -- are usually times when national politics takes a backseat among on-campus interests. During non-class intervals, the Rockefeller Center for Government and Public Policy stands empty.



2-day sheep chase vexes farm

The chase lasted 50 hours and involved the same number of volunteers and concerned passersby -- it just never broke a speed of five miles per hour. If only Little Bo Peep had been called to the scene. At various points starting Friday morning and ending midday on Sunday, three young sheep -- the entirety of Dartmouth Organic Farm's nascent livestock program -- were on the lam, evading student caretakers and maintaining generally uncooperative attitudes before their return to the Farm, located in nearby Lyme, N.H. The escapade began between 7:30 and 8 a.m.




Hurlbert '91 to try Kobe Bryant case

July, apparently, epitomizes the dog days of summer less for some members of the public sphere than for others. During the month's course, Mark Hurlbert '91, a cross-country skier from 750-person Dillon, Colo., has been pitted against one of the nation's most easily-recognized sports superstars -- and a legal "dream team" to match. The prosecutor who is set to try Los Angeles Lakers shooting guard Kobe Bryant for sexually assaulting a 19-year-old female June 30 at a Vail lodge, Hurlbert has gone from a quiet life as the attorney for Colorado's Fifth Judicial District to morning talk-show appearances, newspaper interviews and now, death threats directed toward him and his family. Even more jarring, perhaps, is the fact that Hurlbert, 34, is only in his eighth month of office.