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Review: Aretha Franklin’s musicality astounds in ‘Amazing Grace’

(07/19/19 6:00am)

“Amazing Grace,” the 2018 movie about the two days spent recording Aretha Franklin’s bestselling live album of the same name, showed at the Hopkins Center for the Arts last weekend. The movie is a true feat, resurrecting footage taken at the event in 1972 but unavailable until now due to technical problems in which video failed to sync with the sound. Finally, in this incredible film, we are able to see the Queen of Soul perform her album “Amazing Grace” at the New Temple Missionary Baptist Church in Watts, Los Angeles.


Review: 'Stranger Things 3' is an electric revival of the series

(07/12/19 6:00am)

On Fourth of July weekend, I powered up my laptop, logged into Netflix and clicked on the big, bright banner advertising the release of “Stranger Things 3.” My expectations were low. After a lackluster second season, I missed the excitement that surrounded the series when it first premiered — back when the #ImWithBarb campaign trended on social media, memes about Eleven’s name went viral and Eggo waffles surged in sales. I wanted the third season of the sci-fi-horror series to bring the same magic it had created with its 2016 launch. One weekend-long Netflix binge later, I am confident that the magic of “Stranger Things” has finally returned to Hawkins in what may be its best season yet.


Review: ‘Ma’ fails to be a horror film, let alone a good horror film

(07/05/19 6:00am)

Typically, disappointment has shaped my experience with horror movies. I watch them expecting to be scared and they wind up making me laugh more than some top-billed comedies. Incohesive plots, stupid characters and cliché twists are far too prevalent in most commercially successful horror films. I wish I could say this spring’s latest horror film, “Ma” was any different, but the most credit I can give the film is for its self-awareness — “Ma” knows just how campy it is. 


'Humans' by Circa to shift perspective on circus arts and emotion

(06/28/19 6:00am)

Tonight, Saturday and Sunday “Humans” by Circa will be showing at the Moore Theater at the Hopkins Center. Circa is a world-renowned Australian circus troupe that pushes the boundaries of contemporary circus performance. According to Hop publicity coordinator Rebecca Bailey, Circa’s “Humans” promises to deliver awe-inspiring stunts, innovative choreography, and most importantly, compelling human emotion. 



Senior interns work to make the Hood Museum inclusive

(06/08/19 6:20am)

The first set of Hood Museum senior interns in the newly-renovated museum have set a precedent for inclusion and innovation within the space. Besides the two Native American Art interns, who collaborated on creating an entire gallery, the six members of the Class of 2019 and one member of the Class of 2020 who participated in the internship program each put together their own exhibit or “Space for Dialogue” within an individual specialty. 


"Game of Thrones" fails to "break the wheel" in its final season

(05/28/19 6:05am)

At this point, it’s no secret that the eighth and final season of “Game of Thrones” was extremely polarizing. The mileage of fans and critics varied, but the general consensus seems to be that the final three episodes torched what has quite possibly become the most popular TV series of all time. Showrunners David Benioff ’92 and D.B. Weiss resolved the show’s two major plot threads by essentially splitting these last six episodes into two mini-seasons; whereas episodes one through three feature the long-awaited confrontation with the White Walkers, episodes four through six cover the subsequent power struggle over the Iron Throne, the seat of power in the story’s fictional Seven Kingdoms. While the first arc was generally well received, it’s the baffling storytelling in the second that will haunt “Game of Thrones” forever. 



Student Spotlight: Lila McKenna ’20 and Nextlife collaborate

(05/24/19 6:30am)

Music is the art of collaboration, and no one knows this better than Lila McKenna ’20, who started working with the musical duo Nextlife this past fall. Consisting of Max Fuster ’21 and Henry Phipps ’21, Nextlife formed during Fuster and Phipps’ freshman fall when the pair met and bonded over their shared love for music. Their song “Be Better,” featuring McKenna, reached 100,000 listeners on Spotify since it was released last year. The trio also recently released their new single “Glide” on all major musical platforms. Since their collaboration, the trio said that they have challenged each other as artists and have created music that resonates with listeners. 


Review: ‘Homecoming: A Film by Beyoncé’ is illuminating

(05/23/19 6:01am)

We have all seen it: a huge sensation, a star burning brightly and boldly. But then, the star crashes down, never to resurface except in commercials for yogurt and the occasional magazine shot that boasts a collection of “Hollywood Has-Beens: Where Are They Now?” Beautiful poetry, films and plays have been written on the idea that there is an upper limit to the number of stars our world can worship and, thus, some must fall. But not Beyoncé. Never Beyoncé.


Review: Netflix’s series ‘Bonding’ is derivative and unnuanced

(05/21/19 6:06am)

BDSM is a topic of fascination that has been rising bit by bit outside of the shadow of stigma in recent years. With videos like Buzzfeed’s “Couples Try Bondage For The First Time,” released two years ago, and “I Became A Dominatrix To Control My Anxiety,” released just a year and a half after — with plenty of other tangentially related videos in between — it’s clear that BDSM is no longer something people are ashamed of talking about. If anything, kinky has become cool, and there’s a large market of people who want to know more. 


Review: ‘Father of the Bride’ is dark despite bright melodies

(05/21/19 6:00am)

It’s a recurring theme in discussions amongst Vampire Weekend fans that their albums correspond to seasons. Their self-titled debut album, full of perky strings and New England imagery, is reminiscent of a collegiate fall. Their sophomore effort, “Contra,” with its bright synths and upbeat tempos, brings to mind a sunny summer day. And “Modern Vampires of the City,” their third album, is the definition of wintry, with its black and white cover and its existential, morbid themes.


Renovations make Hood Museum more accessible to community

(05/17/19 6:10am)

I’ve never thought much about how art is moved. We can carry small pieces or move them on a cart, but what about the massive ones? Like “Guernica” or “Water Lilies” or “Hovor,” a piece on display in the new Hood Museum of Art? The answer: a massive elevator, one story high, that could fit at least eight normal elevators inside it. This is my first point of contact with the inner workings of the Hood Museum of Art. 


Q&A with Two Friends musician Eli Sones

(05/17/19 6:05am)

In the days before this year’s Green Key concert, The Dartmouth sat down with Eli Sones, one half of the LA-based DJ group Two Friends, best known for their extensive collection of “Big Bootie” mixes. A Los Angeles native and long-time music lover, Sones began pursuing music seriously while in high school and has continued evolving artistically ever since. Working alongside his childhood bestfriend and fellow DJ-Producer Matthew Halper — the other half of Two Friends — Sones has learned a lot about the importance of connection and cooperation throughout his musical career. Over the course of the interview, Sones shared his insights as a musician who is well-versed in collaboration and creation.



Natives at the Museum: Repatriation and the Reconceptualization in the Museum Space

(05/16/19 6:00am)

In 2002, the Hood Museum returned a Tlingit Chilkat shirt to southeast Alaska. The shirt, which was said to have been made before the 1880s, had been in possession of Axel Rasmussen, the superintendent of schools in Wrangell, AK. After his death, it found its way into the possession of a New York City art dealer, and when it was not sold, it was donated to Dartmouth in 1959. 


Review: ‘Pokémon Detective Pikachu’ is not quite surreal enough

(05/14/19 6:05am)

“Pokémon Detective Pikachu” is without a doubt one of the most bizarre ideas for a mainstream, Hollywood family film that I’ve encountered in recent memory. To be clear, I’m not referring to the basic notion of adapting the hugely popular Japanese multi-media franchise into a live-action American film. “Pokémon” is so ubiquitous at this point that even if you’ve never really experienced it –— as is the case with me — you’ve almost certainly at least heard about it through cultural osmosis. Moreover, that ubiquity practically transformed into notoriety with the 2016 release of the augmented reality game “Pokémon Go,” of which, again, you’ve almost definitely heard. 


Student Spotlight: Stephanie Everett ’19 performs with passion

(05/14/19 6:00am)

For Stephanie Everett ’19, her career on stage far predates her recent roles in the Dartmouth productions of “Eclipsed” and “Into the Woods.” Rather, it dates back to her fourth-grade talent show, in which she and four other girls performed “Hard Knock Life” from “Annie” complete with props and choreography. According to Everett, her passion for theater grew from that day on; she participated in musicals throughout middle school and high school, where she said she found a serious program with a dedicated teacher.



Student Spotlight: Kelleen Moriarty ’19 reimagines dated theater

(05/09/19 6:01am)

Kelleen Moriarty ’19, the student director for the upcoming production of “The Glass Menagerie,” has been involved in theater since she was in middle school. According to Moriarty, when she first came to Dartmouth, she knew that she wanted to major in theater and eventually pursue it professionally, since theater was “the one thing” in her life she was “very sure” of.