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Review: Disney Plus’ ‘Loki’ is ripe with potential but needed more time to develop

(07/23/21 5:02am)

When the Marvel Cinematic Universe announced a wave of new television shows, it was no surprise that the charismatic brother of Thor, Loki, secured a series all to himself. Played by the beloved actor Tom Hiddleston, Loki won over viewers with his debut in 2011’s “Thor.” Despite his introduction as a villain, MCU fans have watched him develop into a reformed hero. Disney Plus’ new show “Loki” follows this evolution and expands on Loki’s character development by exploring the meaning of free will, faith and identity. 




Review: Marvel’s ‘Black Widow’ is Thrilling, but Lacks Depth Natasha Deserves

(07/16/21 5:04am)

Marvel’s “Black Widow” weaves a touching story about abuse, family and survival. The movie tackles the difficult theme of the dehumanization of young women through fantastic acting, writing and, of course, fighting. In the larger context of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, though, “Black Widow” still feels like too little, too late for the titular character. After a decade as a superhero sidekick, fans can’t help but feel that Black Widow deserved more.


The Hood hosts virtual public workshop on expressive writing

(07/16/21 5:09am)

On July 15, the Hood Museum of Art sponsored a workshop on expressive writing, the sixth installment of the virtual series. The event was co-facilitated by the founder of the Writer’s Center of White River Junction Joni Cole and Hood teaching specialist Vivian Ladd. The event, which took place Thursday evening over Zoom, was free and open to the public. 



Preview: Big Red Machine to feature various collaborators on new genre-fluid album

(07/09/21 5:00am)

Big Red Machine, a duo composed of The National’s Aaron Dessner and Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon, is releasing its second album “How Long Do You Think It’s Gonna Last?” on Aug. 27. The album is the latest installment in a burst of creative energy and wide-ranging collaboration, sparked by the pandemic, from Dessner and Vernon. Leading up to the album drop, they have released three singles that offer a glimpse into the experimental compilation. 


Nugget Theaters reopen, pandemic restrictions still in place

(07/09/21 5:05am)

On June 18, downtown Hanover’s Nugget Theaters reopened for in-person screenings, showing three movies each day on weekends. The theater reopened with COVID-19 restrictions and protections in place. These include plexiglass partitions in the ticketing area, required masks for patrons when not enjoying concessions, 50% occupancy limits in each theater, extra cleaning and sanitization, assigned seating for patrons and a brand new $800,000 HVAC system. 


Hood Museum acquires over 6,000 vintage Hollywood photographs

(07/02/21 5:05am)

The Hood Museum of Art has completed a project to acquire over 6,000 Hollywood photographs from the John Kobal Foundation, an organization based in the United Kingdom dedicated to collecting and furthering photography in remembrance of its namesake. The photographs acquired by the Hood feature major stars and scenes from 20th century North American film such as Buster Keaton, Lillian Gish, and Marlon Brando. They offer a glimpse into parts of Hollywood often overlooked — including the photographers themselves.


Q&A: Frank J. Barrett, Jr. on his new book, ‘Lost Hanover, New Hampshire’

(07/02/21 5:00am)

Frank J. “Jay” Barrett Jr. has always had a passion for architecture and a love for the town of Hanover. As a former Hanover Historical Society president and an architect by profession, Barrett has himself made contributions to chronicling the town’s history, even recommending buildings to the National Register of Historic Places. As a writer he has thoroughly chronicled Hanover’s rich history in the three volumes he has already published on the history of Hanover. 


Review: Bo Burnham’s ‘Inside’ vividly explores an existential crisis

(06/25/21 6:00am)

Since garnering mass attention with his music-based performances on YouTube at just 16, Bo Burnham has been an iconic presence in the comedy community. He has an impressive discography of surprisingly introspective songs, such as “Art is Dead” and “Lower Your Expectations,” which discuss the harrowing problems of comedic brilliance and leave the listener cackling while also questioning society. With his newest Netflix special “Inside,” Burnham builds on his catalogue of self-reflective songs as he struggles to understand his place in a convoluted world.



Machine Gun Kelly reaches new depths in 'Tickets to My Downfall'

(05/24/21 6:00am)

Machine Gun Kelly’s newest album transcends his former rap concentration and launches the artist into his newest exploration: pop-punk. Based heavily on popular music of the early 2000s, “Tickets to My Downfall” marks the genre’s return to popularity with a new edge that makes it stronger than before. With over 66 million streams, Kelly has seen more commercial success from this album than any of his previous work, proving his versatility by successfully making the difficult jump to a new genre.



Q&A: Katherine Forbes Riley ‘96 on her debut novel “The Bobcat”

(05/20/21 6:00am)

Katherine Forbes Riley ‘96, a computational linguist and author, graduated from Dartmouth with a degree in linguistics with a concentration in pre-med. She went on to receive her doctorate in computational linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania in 2003. In June 2019, Forbes Riley published her debut novel, “The Bobcat.” Some of her other creative works, including her short fiction work “Speaks My Language,” have appeared in the Wigleaf 2018 Top 50 list, among other literary magazines. For her creative writing, she has received the Inkslinger’s Award for Creative Excellence, an award presented by Buffalo Almanack to the best short story and art piece in each issue of the publication.


With a new sound, St. Vincent finds a stunning, personal voice in “Daddy’s Home”

(05/20/21 6:05am)

Until recently, Annie Clark’s — who goes by the stage name St. Vincent — most personal album was “Marry Me,” her debut album, which came out in 2007. Since then, she’s leaned more and more into her St. Vincent persona. Even songs that explored her personal struggles, like “Marrow” or “Strange Mercy,” feel detached from the real Annie Clark, distorted through the filter of St. Vincent. For a long time, this strategy worked well, as much of her best work can be found on albums like “Actor,” “Strange Mercy'' and “St. Vincent.” However, the culmination of this style was 2017’s “Masseduction,” a deeply impersonal album that felt sanitized and cold, both lyrically and musically. However, St. Vincent reverses course with her most recent album “Daddy’s Home,” that features much more personal lyrics.


Art and Internships in a Virtual World

(05/17/21 6:00am)

Since last spring, when businesses across the country were forced to move their operations online, arts organizations have had to adapt to the new virtual world. While virtualization has proven difficult for many of these organizations, it has also come with a silver lining for the industry. As a result of the transition, new opportunities have emerged for a technologically savvy generation of artists. Dartmouth students seeking experience in the arts world, whether during an off term or through the College, have been a part of ushering the arts into a digital format.


The D-Constructed Cook: MSG

(05/17/21 6:05am)

MSG is making its revival. Formally known as monosodium glutamate, MSG is an additive, like salt or sugar, that is used as a food seasoning. Famous chefs like J. Kenji López-Alt and David Chang praise MSG for its unique umami flavor and encourage home cooks to try it. Samrit Nosrat, author of the bestselling cookbook “Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat,” claims that MSG is the “best $2 you can spend at the grocery store,” and I couldn’t agree more. 


“People We Meet on Vacation” is a sweet, slow-burning romance

(05/13/21 6:00am)

If every genre but romantic comedy suddenly disappeared from the face of the earth, absolutely nothing about my media consumption would change. I scan book reviews waiting for a hint of romance in the narrative. My streaming service recommendation algorithms have given up on selling me anything without at least a secondary plot of romance. I am indiscriminate as to whom, where or how fictional characters profess their love for each other — I only insist that they do. I love indie rom-coms about people falling in love while wearing overalls and studying at liberal arts colleges. I love blockbuster movies starring celebs with shiny teeth and perfect hair. I love love, period.