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Student Spotlight: Lexi Warden ’21 explores identity as director of ‘Bulrusher’

(19 hours ago)

Lexi Warden ’21’s final curtain call at Dartmouth will not be on a physical stage, where she usually makes her appearances, but broadcast over the radio. For the past two years, Warden has been working with theater professor Monica White Ndounou on her thesis project, a radio adaptation of Eisa Davis’s 2007 Pulitzer finalist play “Bulrusher.” 




Review: “Cherry” a fanciful adaptation of an honest book about addiction

(04/05/21 6:05am)

“Cherry” by Nico Walker, while refreshingly candid and meaningful in book form, suffers from its prolonged length and an overreliance on tropes in its adaptation to the big-screen. The directors, brothers Anthony and Joe Russo, clearly tried to create something profound out of Walker’s sincere story, yet the two-and-a-half hour film ended up cheesy nonetheless. Every moment in the film is self-conscious, hindering the genuine story from shining through.


The D-Constructed Cook: Soondubu Jjigae

(04/05/21 6:00am)

Cooking Korean food can be intimidating, especially for a beginner cook. Not only can it be difficult to identify the ingredients necessary for a particular recipe, but figuring out how to use each one can also be intimidating. For those looking for an accessible dish to start with, soondubu jjigae is a great introduction to Korean flavors and ingredients and is especially satisfying at this time of year. While it’s still relatively cold out, I love sipping on this warm and spicy broth and feeling satiated after a meal — without feeling overstuffed. When fresh spring vegetables are not yet available, I often resort to pantry staples to cook my favorite Korean dish, and I urge any beginner cook to explore this dish as well.


“The Radical Joy Project” frees student creative spirits via a collaborative multimedia performance

(04/01/21 6:00am)

“The Radical Joy Project” is a mixed media student performance series showcasing a wide range of art forms including music, theater and dance. The project seeks to convey the joy and liberation that art can bring, through singing, acting and dancing. In three parts — “The Past,” “The Present” and “The Future” — the performance explores the overarching theme of joy, with a focus on finding joy in the current trying times. The series is set to premiere on April 8 and 9 at 8 p.m. on the Hopkins Center for the Arts's Youtube channel. 


Recording Academy made smart, unsurprising decisions at 2021 Grammy Awards

(03/29/21 6:00am)

The 63rd annual Grammy Awards, which took place on March 14th, marked the continuation of this year’s socially distanced award season. Unlike the Golden Globes a few weeks ago, the Recording Academy chose to hold its ceremony outdoors where it could host nominees in person. The format worked well, making the ceremony feel more like a normal, pre-COVID event. 



Review: ‘WandaVision’ takes Marvel in fresh new direction

(03/09/21 7:00am)

Martin Scorsese once said that Marvel movies were more akin to theme parks than cinema — a claim that drew the ire of many passionate nerds who rushed to the defense of the $22 billion grossing franchise. His rationale was that the films were predictable and didn’t convey the unique emotional and psychological experiences of its characters in the way that he believes true cinema does. 


78th Golden Globes kicks off awards season with socially distanced audience, technical difficulties

(03/04/21 7:09am)

On Sunday, the 78th Golden Globe Awards began the strangest awards season in recent memory. The ceremony was held mostly virtually, with half taking place in New York and half in Los Angeles. Instead of the usual array of celebrities, the in-person audience was made up entirely of socially distanced first responders and essential workers, while the nominees all teleconferenced in. 


Dance Heginbotham premieres newest installment in '24 Caprices' project

(03/04/21 7:00am)

On Feb. 22, contemporary dance company Dance Heginbotham and violinist Colin Jacobsen took to Hop@Home to share the world premiere of Caprices #5 and #6 — the two latest installments in the ensemble’s “24 Caprices” series. Throughout the pandemic, the project has sought to explore each entry of composer Niccolò Paganini's “24 Caprices for Solo Violin.” 




Student Spotlight: Kevin Soraci ’18 finds beauty in the mundane in ‘The Comforts of Home’

(02/25/21 7:10am)

Studio art intern Kevin Soraci ’18 seeks to find beauty in the ordinary. Soraci’s exhibition “The Comforts of Home,” currently displayed in the Barrows Rotunda of the Hopkins Center for the Arts, features paintings of scenes from everyday life, capturing a space that can feel both familiar and peculiar.


Hopkins Center’s ‘Convergence’ Series highlights intersection of arts and science

(02/25/21 7:00am)

On Feb. 11-12, viewers from across the globe tuned into the Convergence Symposium, a two-day event hosted by the Hopkins Center for the Arts. The symposium, which featured presentations from professors and artists, kicked off the Hop’s “Convergence” series, a joint venture with the Irving Institute for Energy and Society focused on educating the Dartmouth community on the overlap between art and science. Over 300 viewers joined the event over Zoom.


Hopkins Center hosts conversation with comedian Nick Kroll, Latif Nasser ’08

(02/22/21 7:05am)

On Friday night, actor and comedian Nick Kroll, co-creator of the Netflix series “Big Mouth,” participated in a live conversation hosted by Latif Nasser ’08 of WNYC’s “Radiolab.” Throughout the conversation, presented by Collis Programming Board and the Hopkins Center for the Arts, Kroll discussed his career in television and how his personal experiences inspired his work. 


Review: ‘Ignorance’ by The Weather Station contemplates humanity’s place in the natural world

(02/19/21 7:10am)

Frontwoman Tamara Lindeman takes a grand leap on The Weather Station’s fifth album, “Ignorance.” She departs from the band’s previous indie-folk sound to undertake an emotive art rock project brimming with existentialism. Lindeman interweaves personal storytelling with reflections on climate change and urbanization, bringing emotional weight to easily depersonalized issues. Despite a sometimes simplistic sound, the masterful lyricism of “Ignorance” offers a poignant take on the ongoing destruction of the natural world.


New platform ‘Artivism’ provides forum for activism, art

(02/15/21 7:00am)

In the wake of last year’s Black Lives Matter protests and ongoing calls for racial justice, Walt Cunningham, director of Dartmouth's Gospel Choir and Contemporary Pop Ensembles, launched “Artivism,” an organization based in the music department that sponsors and produces arts-related social justice projects run by students and faculty. 


Review: Weezer’s 'OK Human' a sincere, dynamic return to the band’s roots

(02/11/21 7:09am)

No other band has had as inconsistent a career as Weezer has. After achieving critical and commercial success with the power-pop of their 1994 self-titled first album, the darker direction of Weezer’s second album, “Pinkerton,” initially drew negative reviews, despite later achieving cult status. Lead singer Rivers Cuomo’s embarrassment over “Pinkerton” led to a long series of albums in the 2000s full of safe, boring pop music that lacked the magic of Weezer’s early work. While the band did produce a couple of albums I enjoyed during this period, particularly 2016’s “White Album,” they reached a low with 2019’s “Black Album.” 


Winter Carnival designs give video games a Dartmouth twist

(02/08/21 7:00am)

A staple of a 111-year-old tradition, the Winter Carnival art competition this year drew on the theme “Level Up: Carnival Rebooted,” inspired by the largely digital nature of the event. This year, Allan Rubio ’23 created the winning poster design, which depicts a video game set up in a dorm room overlooking Baker Tower. Brian Lee ’22 made the winning T-shirt design, featuring the classic Atari “Pong” game as its foundation.