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Hopkins Center’s ‘Convergence’ Series highlights intersection of arts and science

(02/25/21 7:00am)

On Feb. 11-12, viewers from across the globe tuned into the Convergence Symposium, a two-day event hosted by the Hopkins Center for the Arts. The symposium, which featured presentations from professors and artists, kicked off the Hop’s “Convergence” series, a joint venture with the Irving Institute for Energy and Society focused on educating the Dartmouth community on the overlap between art and science. Over 300 viewers joined the event over Zoom.


Hopkins Center hosts conversation with comedian Nick Kroll, Latif Nasser ’08

(02/22/21 7:05am)

On Friday night, actor and comedian Nick Kroll, co-creator of the Netflix series “Big Mouth,” participated in a live conversation hosted by Latif Nasser ’08 of WNYC’s “Radiolab.” Throughout the conversation, presented by Collis Programming Board and the Hopkins Center for the Arts, Kroll discussed his career in television and how his personal experiences inspired his work. 


Review: ‘Ignorance’ by The Weather Station contemplates humanity’s place in the natural world

(02/19/21 7:10am)

Frontwoman Tamara Lindeman takes a grand leap on The Weather Station’s fifth album, “Ignorance.” She departs from the band’s previous indie-folk sound to undertake an emotive art rock project brimming with existentialism. Lindeman interweaves personal storytelling with reflections on climate change and urbanization, bringing emotional weight to easily depersonalized issues. Despite a sometimes simplistic sound, the masterful lyricism of “Ignorance” offers a poignant take on the ongoing destruction of the natural world.


New platform ‘Artivism’ provides forum for activism, art

(02/15/21 7:00am)

In the wake of last year’s Black Lives Matter protests and ongoing calls for racial justice, Walt Cunningham, director of Dartmouth's Gospel Choir and Contemporary Pop Ensembles, launched “Artivism,” an organization based in the music department that sponsors and produces arts-related social justice projects run by students and faculty. 


Review: Weezer’s 'OK Human' a sincere, dynamic return to the band’s roots

(02/11/21 7:09am)

No other band has had as inconsistent a career as Weezer has. After achieving critical and commercial success with the power-pop of their 1994 self-titled first album, the darker direction of Weezer’s second album, “Pinkerton,” initially drew negative reviews, despite later achieving cult status. Lead singer Rivers Cuomo’s embarrassment over “Pinkerton” led to a long series of albums in the 2000s full of safe, boring pop music that lacked the magic of Weezer’s early work. While the band did produce a couple of albums I enjoyed during this period, particularly 2016’s “White Album,” they reached a low with 2019’s “Black Album.” 


Winter Carnival designs give video games a Dartmouth twist

(02/08/21 7:00am)

A staple of a 111-year-old tradition, the Winter Carnival art competition this year drew on the theme “Level Up: Carnival Rebooted,” inspired by the largely digital nature of the event. This year, Allan Rubio ’23 created the winning poster design, which depicts a video game set up in a dorm room overlooking Baker Tower. Brian Lee ’22 made the winning T-shirt design, featuring the classic Atari “Pong” game as its foundation.


A tribute to Sophie, hyperpop pioneer and LGBTQ+ icon

(02/08/21 7:05am)

Sophie Xeon, stylized as SOPHIE, was a Grammy-nominated avante garde singer and producer behind some of the biggest names in pop music.  Before the artist’s unexpected death at 34 on Jan. 31, Sophie had pioneered the hyperpop subgenre — a radical blend of trance, electronic and hip hop music —  and collaborated frequently with pop stars like Charli XCX. As a transgender artist, Sophie also inspired many LGBTQ+ listeners and queer musicians.



Review: ‘The Weasel's Tale’ offers plot twists and dark comedy

(02/01/21 7:00am)

A decade after Argentinian director Juan José Campanella’s “The Secret in Their Eyes” won the 2010 Academy Award for best foreign film, Campanella made his return to live-action cinema with “The Weasel’s Tale” — a remake of the 1976 film “Yesterday's Guys Used No Arsenic.” Campanella’s dark comedy, offered through the Hopkins Center for the Arts’ “Film on Demand” series until Wednesday, follows former starlet Mara Ordaz, played by Graciela Borges, who lives with three filmmaking colleagues in a secluded mansion on the outskirts of Buenos Aires. 



Review: Chris Stapleton’s ‘Starting Over’ combines masterful lyricism with powerful vocals

(01/21/21 7:00am)

Since the release of his debut album in 2015, Chris Stapleton has made a name for himself in country music — opting for the grit and rough edges of the genre’s earlier days rather than the bikinis and pickup trucks of its pop iteration. Gifted with masterful songwriting and a powerful voice, Stapleton knows how to write an affecting song and drive home its emotions with his distinctive, raspy tone. With his fourth solo album, “Starting Over” — which debuted in November — Stapleton has truly mastered his craft, tugging at heartstrings with the lyrics of one song and excoriating your soul with his vocals on the next.



Dartmouth students launch 'Meetinghouse' literary magazine

(01/11/21 7:00am)

Last fall, three students came together with the idea of developing a new publication to connect Dartmouth undergraduates with the wider literary world. This December, the efforts of Frances Mize ’22, Avery Saklad ’21 and Ethan Weinstein ’21 came to fruition in the first edition of Meetinghouse, a literary magazine that has already attracted submissions from over 1,200 authors and poets from around the world.


New titles for the new year: A guide to Netflix and Hulu's January offerings

(01/07/21 7:00am)

The start of the new year heralds change — often in the form of New Year’s resolutions, but also when it comes to new titles on our favorite streaming services. With the arrival of 2021, Netflix and Hulu have welcomed a slew of classic titles to their collections. Wondering what movies you should watch from the comfort of your home or dorm room? Look no further: Here are our favorite “new” old movies to enjoy in the brand new year.


2020 Music in Review: The 10 best albums of the year

(11/16/20 7:05am)

From beginning to (almost) end, 2020 has been the most unconventional year in recent memory. And naturally, the music released this year has been strange. While those who released music at the beginning of the year largely finished recording before the pandemic began, many artists releasing albums at the tail-end have had to work around stay-at-home orders and general shutdowns. As always, art has found a way to overcome, and these 10 albums represent some of the best music released in this otherwise difficult year.


The D-Constructed Cook: Hosting a Pandemic-Friendly Friendsgiving

(11/16/20 7:00am)

Over the years, the idea of “Friendsgiving” — a Thanksgiving meal with friends — has become wildly popular, especially among college students. It’s a great excuse to host a dinner party, catch up with friends and share good food and drink. I have fond memories from my first two years at Dartmouth of gathering at a friend’s house at the end of fall term and feeling the stress dissipate as winter break began. 


Review: Final season of ‘Schitt’s Creek’ champions love and acceptance

(11/12/20 7:00am)

On Oct. 3, Netflix released the sixth and final season of the Canadian comedy series “Schitt’s Creek.” Originally aired in Canada on CBC and in the U.S. on Pop TV, the show deftly and hilariously tells the story of the once-wealthy Rose family, who have fallen from grace and must live in the small town of Schitt’s Creek. 


The D-Constructed Cook: Essential Building Blocks For Easy Everyday Meals

(11/12/20 7:00am)

There is nothing more defeating than walking into the kitchen ravenously hungry after a long day of work — and then having to cook. Expending the effort to plan a meal, prep ingredients, cook the dish and then clean afterward is simply tiresome, even for those who enjoy the act of cooking. If you’re on an off-term or taking classes while living off campus, preparing food can add another layer of stress to an already stressful day. But thankfully, all that stress is not necessary for quotidian cooking.


Review: Clipping’s ‘Visions of Bodies Being Burned’ offers terrifying narrative of America’s societal problems

(11/09/20 7:05am)

For the better part of the decade, experimental hip-hop group Clipping — stylized as clipping. — has played a pivotal role in the revitalization of horrorcore. Consisting of rapper Daveed Diggs — known for his role as Marquis de Lafayette and Thomas Jefferson in the 2015 Broadway hit “Hamilton” — and producers William Hutson and Jonathan Snipes, Clipping prides themselves on taking elements of horror films and transforming them into musical form. The trio’s name perfectly encapsulates their production style, as harsh, industrial noises overlay unnerving, spine-tingling screams and discord. 


Q&A: Allie Levy ’11 on running Hanover’s Still North Books & Bar

(11/09/20 7:00am)

After graduating from Dartmouth, Allie Levy ’11 had two dreams. The first was that she would pursue a career aligning with her English major, potentially in bookselling. The second was that she might one day come back to Hanover. Last winter, Levy fulfilled both. She had a soft opening for the Main Street bookstore Still North Books & Bar on Dec. 19 of last year. The space is airy, calming and filled with a diverse collection of books that Levy hopes both students and Upper Valley residents can enjoy. 




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