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Q&A: Italian Professor Damiano Benvegnù on Dartmouth’s Environmental Humanities Initiative

(02/10/21 7:05am)

When Italian professor Damiano Benvegnù came to Dartmouth, he saw a divide between the sciences and humanities where there should have been a bridge. Particularly in response to the climate crisis, he noted that the cry for change is interdisciplinary — incorporating a diverse dialogue of voices from policy to poetry to art to science.





Q&A: Allie Levy ’11 on running Hanover’s Still North Books & Bar

(11/09/20 7:00am)

After graduating from Dartmouth, Allie Levy ’11 had two dreams. The first was that she would pursue a career aligning with her English major, potentially in bookselling. The second was that she might one day come back to Hanover. Last winter, Levy fulfilled both. She had a soft opening for the Main Street bookstore Still North Books & Bar on Dec. 19 of last year. The space is airy, calming and filled with a diverse collection of books that Levy hopes both students and Upper Valley residents can enjoy. 


Q&A: ‘Missionaries’ author Phil Klay ’05 on his new novel, modern warfare

(10/26/20 6:05am)

In 2014, Iraq war veteran Phil Klay ’05 won the National Book Award for fiction with his debut short story collection, “Redeployment.” This year, he published his first novel, “Missionaries,” which tells the story of terrorism, drug wars and global conflict in Colombia through four intertwined perspectives. The story follows U.S. Army Special Forces medic Mason, foreign correspondent Lisette, Colombian officer Juan Pablo and Colombian militia lieutenant Abel as they struggle to navigate life in the midst of war. Klay’s work has been heavily influenced by his time serving in the U.S. Marines. 


Q&A: Sen. Jeanne Shaheen on partisanship, upcoming election

(10/26/20 6:00am)

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., is the first woman in American history to have served both as governor and as a U.S. senator. In the Senate, she sits on the Appropriations, Armed Services and Foreign Relations committees, among others. Shaheen has also held legislative office at the state level, serving two terms in New Hampshire’s state Senate in the 1990s. Outside of elected office, Shaheen has served as a teacher at Dover and Water Valley High Schools, owned a small retail business and directed the Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics.



Q&A with Frances Cha ’07, author of ‘If I Had Your Face’

(09/21/20 6:05am)

Frances Cha ’07’s debut novel “If I Had Your Face” has been making waves in the literary world. The Guardian praised the novel — a story about four young women navigating the rigid cultural hierarchies, impossible beauty standards and plastic surgery craze of contemporary Korean culture — as a “fizzing, grisly debut.” The Washington Post even likened the book to Bong Joon-Ho’s Academy Award-winning “Parasite.” 



Hood deputy director Juliette Bianco to receive NEMA award

(11/08/19 7:10am)

Deputy director of the Hood Museum Juliette Bianco ’94 will be presented with a 2019 New England Museum Association Excellence Award today at the association’s annual meeting, where three other Hood staff members will also be presenting their work. Bianco oversees the Hood’s exhibitions and often travels to speak about the benefits and opportunities that museums can bring to college campuses.


Q&A with AAAS, theater professor and activist Shamell Bell

(10/24/19 6:00am)

Shamell Bell, an original member of the Black Lives Matter movement, brings forth her experience as a community organizer and advocate for black activism as a lecturer in the African and African American studies and theater departments. She is currently teaching THEA 1, “Introduction to Theater” and THEA 21, “Race, Gender and Performance.”


Q&A with studio art professor and architect Zenovia Toloudi

(10/22/19 6:00am)

Studio art professor Zenovia Toloudi’s “Technoutopias” series is currently on display in the Jaffe-Friede and Strauss Galleries, located in the Hopkins Center. An architect and artist, Toloudi explores the interactions, or lack thereof, between humans and public spaces in her current exhibit. Her work uses various materials and techniques to show this relationship and the impact of architecture on social interactions and the civil self. 


Q&A with Pass By Catastrophe musician Zach Plante ’18

(09/17/19 6:10am)

Alumnus and musician Zach Plante ’18 has taken his passion for music coast to coast and is set to release his first extended play record with the band Pass By Catastrophe on Sept. 27. Plante, who plays bass, guitar and piano in Pass By Catastrophe, is accompanied by Dexter Simpson, Max Kilberg and Sam Silverman. The band produces rock, indie rock and pop rock that is, according to Plante, reminiscent of the past but with a new modern twist.


Q&A with Jeff Sharlet, author of Netflix-adapted ‘The Family’

(08/16/19 6:00am)

In his two books “The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power” and “C-Street: The Fundamentalist Threat to American Democracy,” English and creative writing professor Jeff Sharlet takes deep dives into the political influence of the Christian organization known as “The Fellowship” or “The Family” both within and beyond the U.S. 


Q&A: Jessica Hong, the new Global Contemporary art curator

(01/24/19 7:30am)

This Saturday, the Hood museum will finally reopen after being closed for extensive renovations, but the modern architectural design isn’t the only thing that’s new. As part of the museum’s transition, the Hood has created the new position of Global Contemporary Art Curator to promote bringing thought-provoking works to campus. Newcomer Jessica Hong discusses her role at the Hood and how she hopes to make an impact on campus. 



Q&A with Tracie Williams '05

(02/28/18 7:15am)

Tracie Williams ’05 discovered her love of the outdoors as an undergraduate after participating in a backcountry skiing break trip sponsored by the Outdoor Programs Office. After exploring various jobs related to the outdoors — her field of interest — Williams has returned to the Outdoor Programs Office’s staff to serve as assistant director for leadership and experiential education. Although it is only her fourth week working at the College, she hopes to draw upon her past experience as a student at the College to foster an inclusive community and encourage students to try something new.


Q&A with Rabbi Edward Boraz

(02/21/18 7:30am)

Rabbi Edward Boraz has served as the rabbi for both the Dartmouth and the Upper Valley Jewish Community congregations for the past 20 years. He is the executive director of Dartmouth Hillel and runs Project Preservation, an annual service trip to restore Jewish cemeteries in Eastern Europe. After studying psychology and earning a law degree at Loyola University in Chicago, he applied his studies towards his rabbinical practices. Boraz will be stepping down from his positions at Dartmouth and in the Upper Valley Area on July 1 to serve as the rabbi of a small congregation in Wausau, Wisconsin.


Alumna Q&A: audio journalist and producer Laura Sim ’16

(02/20/18 6:20am)

Independent radio and podcast producer, Laura Sim ’16 majored in English at Dartmouth and completed a thesis on race in radio and podcasts. In 2016, her podcast “This Dartmouth Life” helped Sim receive the John D. Bryant award for Creative Production. After graduating, she worked at Slate, Gimlet Media, Radiotopia and now, the Wall Street Journal. Sim helped produce “The United States of Debt” at Slate and worked as an associate producer on Radiotopia’s “Millennial” and Gimlet Media’s “Crimetown,” a critically-acclaimed podcast about politics and organized crime in Providence, Rhode Island.