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Q&A with ‘Female Complaints’ writer Kate Mulley ’05

(07/15/22 6:00am)

Playwright Kate Mulley ’05 recently collaborated with musical artist Tina deVaron to write the musical “Female Complaints,” which they brought to Dartmouth to workshop as part of VoxLab — a theater residency held each summer for alums to develop their projects. From July 4 to July 10, a select group of students in the course THEA 65, “Summer Theater Lab,” brought Mulley and deVaron’s vision to life for the first time. According to the show’s promotional materials, “Female Complaints” is a musical that tells the story of the highly skilled abortionist Inez Ingenthron in the 1900s, who becomes the target of the San Francisco district attorney due to her illegal abortion practices. The Dartmouth talked to Mulley about the process of writing and workshopping “Female Complaints,” as well as its relevance in the context of the recent Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.


Q&A With Green Key Performer Parrotfish

(06/02/22 6:00am)

Parrotfish, a Tampa, Florida based band, made up of members Conor Lynch (vocals), Joe Cadrecha (guitar), Trace Chiappe (drums) and Matty Rodrigo (bass), recently performed for Dartmouth students at Phi Delta Alpha fraternity’s block party. The band kicked off the Green Key weekend with an electric performance that drew a massive crowd and packed Webster Avenue. The Dartmouth sat down with Parrotfish to discuss their history as a band, their Dartmouth performance and their many plans for the future. 


Q&A with photographer and filmmaker Hollye Swinehart ’18

(05/26/22 6:00am)

During her time at Dartmouth, Hollye Swinehart ’18 discovered her love for art and photography at the Hopkins Center for the Arts. Now, Swinehart is preparing to film her senior thesis for her Masters in the Arts at the London Film School, a short film called “Cotton Something.” Swinehart is set to graduate in December and submit her film to festivals such as the Telluride Film Festival and Sundance Film Festival. The Dartmouth sat down with Swinehart to discuss her journey from photography to filmmaking and her advice for Dartmouth students on pursuing a career in the arts. 


Q&A: Torrey Peters GR’13 on her debut novel ‘Detransition, Baby’

(07/30/21 5:10am)

“Detransition, Baby,” Torrey Peters GR’13’s debut novel, has been making waves in the publishing industry. It was longlisted for The Women’s Prize and honored as a New York Times Editors Choice. Notably, it is one of the first novels by a transgender person to be published by a big five publishing house — in this case, One World, an imprint of Penguin Random House. 



Q&A: Frank J. Barrett, Jr. on his new book, ‘Lost Hanover, New Hampshire’

(07/02/21 5:00am)

Frank J. “Jay” Barrett Jr. has always had a passion for architecture and a love for the town of Hanover. As a former Hanover Historical Society president and an architect by profession, Barrett has himself made contributions to chronicling the town’s history, even recommending buildings to the National Register of Historic Places. As a writer he has thoroughly chronicled Hanover’s rich history in the three volumes he has already published on the history of Hanover. 


Q&A: Katherine Forbes Riley ‘96 on her debut novel “The Bobcat”

(05/20/21 6:00am)

Katherine Forbes Riley ‘96, a computational linguist and author, graduated from Dartmouth with a degree in linguistics with a concentration in pre-med. She went on to receive her doctorate in computational linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania in 2003. In June 2019, Forbes Riley published her debut novel, “The Bobcat.” Some of her other creative works, including her short fiction work “Speaks My Language,” have appeared in the Wigleaf 2018 Top 50 list, among other literary magazines. For her creative writing, she has received the Inkslinger’s Award for Creative Excellence, an award presented by Buffalo Almanack to the best short story and art piece in each issue of the publication.


Q&A: English and creative writing professor Joshua Bennett on winning the Whiting Award

(04/22/21 6:00am)

Every year, ten of the most promising voices in literature receive the Whiting Award, a prize that Vanity Fair has dubbed the “crystal ball of the literature world” for its tendency to go to up-and-coming writers early in their careers. Past winners have gone on to receive other prestigious awards including the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. On April 14, English and creative writing professor Joshua Bennett won the award for his work in both poetry and nonfiction.




Q&A: Allie Levy ’11 on running Hanover’s Still North Books & Bar

(11/09/20 7:00am)

After graduating from Dartmouth, Allie Levy ’11 had two dreams. The first was that she would pursue a career aligning with her English major, potentially in bookselling. The second was that she might one day come back to Hanover. Last winter, Levy fulfilled both. She had a soft opening for the Main Street bookstore Still North Books & Bar on Dec. 19 of last year. The space is airy, calming and filled with a diverse collection of books that Levy hopes both students and Upper Valley residents can enjoy. 


Q&A: ‘Missionaries’ author Phil Klay ’05 on his new novel, modern warfare

(10/26/20 6:05am)

In 2014, Iraq war veteran Phil Klay ’05 won the National Book Award for fiction with his debut short story collection, “Redeployment.” This year, he published his first novel, “Missionaries,” which tells the story of terrorism, drug wars and global conflict in Colombia through four intertwined perspectives. The story follows U.S. Army Special Forces medic Mason, foreign correspondent Lisette, Colombian officer Juan Pablo and Colombian militia lieutenant Abel as they struggle to navigate life in the midst of war. Klay’s work has been heavily influenced by his time serving in the U.S. Marines. 



Q&A with Frances Cha ’07, author of ‘If I Had Your Face’

(09/21/20 6:05am)

Frances Cha ’07’s debut novel “If I Had Your Face” has been making waves in the literary world. The Guardian praised the novel — a story about four young women navigating the rigid cultural hierarchies, impossible beauty standards and plastic surgery craze of contemporary Korean culture — as a “fizzing, grisly debut.” The Washington Post even likened the book to Bong Joon-Ho’s Academy Award-winning “Parasite.” 


Hood deputy director Juliette Bianco to receive NEMA award

(11/08/19 7:10am)

Deputy director of the Hood Museum Juliette Bianco ’94 will be presented with a 2019 New England Museum Association Excellence Award today at the association’s annual meeting, where three other Hood staff members will also be presenting their work. Bianco oversees the Hood’s exhibitions and often travels to speak about the benefits and opportunities that museums can bring to college campuses.


Q&A with AAAS, theater professor and activist Shamell Bell

(10/24/19 6:00am)

Shamell Bell, an original member of the Black Lives Matter movement, brings forth her experience as a community organizer and advocate for black activism as a lecturer in the African and African American studies and theater departments. She is currently teaching THEA 1, “Introduction to Theater” and THEA 21, “Race, Gender and Performance.”


Q&A with studio art professor and architect Zenovia Toloudi

(10/22/19 6:00am)

Studio art professor Zenovia Toloudi’s “Technoutopias” series is currently on display in the Jaffe-Friede and Strauss Galleries, located in the Hopkins Center. An architect and artist, Toloudi explores the interactions, or lack thereof, between humans and public spaces in her current exhibit. Her work uses various materials and techniques to show this relationship and the impact of architecture on social interactions and the civil self. 


Q&A with Pass By Catastrophe musician Zach Plante ’18

(09/17/19 6:10am)

Alumnus and musician Zach Plante ’18 has taken his passion for music coast to coast and is set to release his first extended play record with the band Pass By Catastrophe on Sept. 27. Plante, who plays bass, guitar and piano in Pass By Catastrophe, is accompanied by Dexter Simpson, Max Kilberg and Sam Silverman. The band produces rock, indie rock and pop rock that is, according to Plante, reminiscent of the past but with a new modern twist.


Q&A with Jeff Sharlet, author of Netflix-adapted ‘The Family’

(08/16/19 6:00am)

In his two books “The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power” and “C-Street: The Fundamentalist Threat to American Democracy,” English and creative writing professor Jeff Sharlet takes deep dives into the political influence of the Christian organization known as “The Fellowship” or “The Family” both within and beyond the U.S. 


Q&A: Jessica Hong, the new Global Contemporary art curator

(01/24/19 7:30am)

This Saturday, the Hood museum will finally reopen after being closed for extensive renovations, but the modern architectural design isn’t the only thing that’s new. As part of the museum’s transition, the Hood has created the new position of Global Contemporary Art Curator to promote bringing thought-provoking works to campus. Newcomer Jessica Hong discusses her role at the Hood and how she hopes to make an impact on campus. 




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