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The Dartmouth
May 26, 2024 | Latest Issue
The Dartmouth

Before the Curtain: Arts on Campus Week 5

This week, Still North Books & Bar hosts an open mic night featuring poet Kate Gibbel, the Hood Museum hosts the Indigenous People’s Fashion Show and the Hopkins Center features numerous films and productions.

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Friday, Oct. 6

Still North Books & Bar will host a Mic & Mingle event at 5:30 p.m., consisting of a one-hour open mic, with poet Kate Gibbel as featured reader, followed by an hour of snacks and mingling. Each reader will have a maximum speaking time of three minutes. Those who wish to participate can sign up in advance on Still North’s website.

The Hopkins Center for the Arts will screen “Shortcomings” at 7 p.m. in the Loew Auditorium. Directed by Randall Park, and based on a graphic novel of the same name, “Shortcomings” is a coming-of-age film about a man who fights to recover a relationship with his ex-girlfriend after she announces her move from the Bay Area to New York. Tickets are available on the Hopkins Center website, with general admission tickets available at $8 per person. 

The Hopkins Center will also host the second and third of six stagings of “Frogman,” an interactive theater performance created by curious directive at 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. in the Black Visual Arts Center film studio. Created by Jack Lowe, director of curious directive and a Hop resident artist, the performance surrounds an investigation of the murder of a young girl. Viewers will spend the first half investigating the protagonist’s memories in virtual reality and the second half interrogating a suspect in the crime. Additional showings will take place on Saturday and Sunday. Tickets are available on the Hop website, with general admission tickets available at $30 per person.

At 9 p.m., Sawtooth Kitchen will feature a performance from Mojohand, a New York-based Americana band that has toured the country since 2016. Tickets are available on Sawtooth’s website for $5 per person.

Saturday, Oct. 7

The Hood Museum of Art will host the Hood Highlights Tour at 2 p.m. Free and open to the public, this one-hour guided tour will cover important pieces in each of the museum galleries. No advance registration is necessary, and attendees may meet in the Russo Atrium five minutes prior to the tour to join.

At 8 p.m., Sawtooth will host The Party Crashers, a cover band primarily focused on danceable hits, both classic and contemporary. Tickets are available on Sawtooth’s website for $5 per person.

At 10 p.m., the Hopkins Center will screen “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” at 10 p.m. in Sarner Underground. Part of their Primal Fear on Film series, the Hopkins Center website refers to the beloved cult film as “the most beloved of all cinematic bacchanalia.” The screening will be free, unticketed and open to the public.

Sunday, Oct. 8

The Hopkins Center will host an advance screening of “The American Buffalo” at 4 p.m. in the Loew Auditorium. The latest documentary by world-renowned director Ken Burns, “The American Buffalo” provides a history of the buffalo in North America over the past 10,000 years, tracking its evolution, endangerment, and relationship to Indigenous people. Tickets are available on the Hopkins Center website, with general admission tickets available at $12 per person.

Tuesday, Oct. 10

At 7 p.m., Still North will host a reading of the novel “Fire in the Canyon,” read by its author, Daniel Gumbiner. The reading of Gumbiner’s second novel — which centers around a California family impacted by climate disaster — is sponsored by the English and Creative Writing department. A reception with the author will follow. The event is open to the public.

Wednesday, Oct. 11

At 4 p.m., the Hood Museum will host “A Space for Dialogue” gallery talk on the exhibition “Love as Ceremony: Legacies of Two-Spirit Liberation,” curated by former Hood Museum intern Moonoka Begay ’23. In the 45-minute talk, Begay will provide an overview of work of contemporary “Two-Spirit” Indigenous artists. The event is free and open to the public.

Thursday, Oct. 12

The Hopkins Center will screen the film “Sherlock Jr.” at 7 p.m. in the Loew Auditorium. Accompanied by a live keyboard score by Bob Merrill, the 1924 film, directed by Buster Keaton, is considered a classic of the silent era. Tickets are available on the Hopkins Center website, with general admission tickets available at $10 per person.

At 8 p.m., the Hood Museum will host the annual  Indigenous People’s Fashion Show. The fashion show is co-sponsored by Hōkūpa’a, Native Americans at Dartmouth and the Native American Program. The Hood Museum website describes the fashion show as a “celebration of Indigenous fashion, creativity, expression and design.” The event will be open to the public.