Graffiti criticizing sexual violence policies, Greek life found on campus

The College is currently investigating the graffiti, according to the College spokesperson.

by Penelope Spurr | 8/19/22 5:00am

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by Farah Lindsey-Almadani / The Dartmouth

At least five incidents of graffiti — made with what appeared to be red spray paint — appeared around campus on Sunday night. The graffiti was found on both sets of doors to Sanborn Library, the sidewalk on the east side of Baker-Berry Library and the corner of the library. The phrases read “Abolish Greek Life” and “Dartmouth protects rapists.”

College spokesperson Diana Lawrence wrote that the graffiti is in the process of being removed and that an investigation by Safety and Security is ongoing. Director of Safety and Security Keiselim Montás declined to comment.

This is not Dartmouth’s only incident of graffiti in recent years.. In May 2021, students protested the College’s mental health policies by spilling red paint on the steps of Parkhurst Hall and writing on the building: “Paint is impermanent. Loss of life is forever.” Less than a week later, the initials of three Dartmouth freshmen who died by suicide surfaced on the pavement outside their respective dorm buildings. 

While declining to comment on the specific graffiti incident, WISE communications and development director Betsy Kohl wrote that WISE is an available resource for the Dartmouth community.

“We welcome opportunities to engage with anyone and any group who is working to eliminate sexual violence,” she wrote. “Whenever there are conversations about making Dartmouth safer, WISE wants to be there.”

In a written statement to The Dartmouth on behalf of the Sexual Assault Peer Alliance, SAPA executive members Ulgen Yildirim ’24, Eliza Holmes ’24 and Caroline Balick ’24 emphasized the group’s effort “to prioritize the wellbeing of survivors.” 

“In order to best provide empathetic and informed support, SAPA is constantly engaging in conversations about gender-based violence on campus and holds continuing education requirements for active SAPAs in response to campus events,” they wrote.

Production executive editor Mia Russo ’23, who is the president of SAPA, was not involved in the editing of this article.

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