Editors' Note

by Kylee Sibilia and Novi Zhukovsky | 2/26/20 2:25am

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by Grace Qu / The Dartmouth

One in six Americans report running out of food at least once a year. In college, where we have meal plans and dining halls, it is easy for some to ignore this problem. But at the collegiate level, food insecurity is still an incredibly pressing issue. A 2019 survey released by Temple University’s Hope Center for College, Community and Justice indicated that 45 percent of student respondents from over 100 institutions said they had experienced food insecurity in the past 30 days. At Dartmouth, students on financial aid who have stayed on campus over interim periods have reported struggling with financing meals.

When we think about food, some of us might imagine our favorite snacks and restaurants. But the relationships between food and power — economic and social — can have big impacts on many others. This week, the Mirror explores this dynamic by looking at how Dartmouth Dining Services deals with food waste and how the dining app Snackpass affects local business owners. We hear from the Mirror staff about their experiences with food and from a student who spends much of her time cooking on campus. When there is enough of it to go around, food brings people together through shared experiences and cultures, and that is worth celebrating.