Susan Matthews


Articles

To the Class of 2017

The first week of classes during the fall of my senior year, the freshman class received an email containing a song sung in eerie auto-tune warning them that Dartmouth frat brothers were rapists and that there was no hope for reform.


Matthews: To the Class of 2017

The first week of classes during the fall of my senior year, the freshman class received an email containing a song sung in eerie auto-tune warning them that Dartmouth frat brothers were rapists and that there was no hope for reform.


Mirror

Matthews: The View from the Balcony

It's a cool night, typical for June in Hanover. From the balcony of Robinson Hall, I can see that the Green has successfully regrown, covering the scars of Homecoming to appear healthy for graduation.


Mirror

Shrouded in secrecy?

Whether it's passing the Sphinx, catching a glimpse of a strange tattoo on the arm of your upperclassman crush or watching your frat brother disappear on a Monday night only to take over the basement a few hours later with a group of seemingly random people, senior societies have a way of making their presence known on campus despite their ostensibly "secret" status.



Students perform at Lone Pine Tavern, which closed in the spring in light of budget cuts, according to Dean of the College Tom Crady.

Lone Pine space to be revamped for the fall

Alice Zhao / The Dartmouth Staff The Collis Governing Board is planning to renovate the area that previously housed Lone Pine Tavern to create a social space for students, according to Tanaka Mhambi '11, chair of the Collis Governing Board.


Meleia Willis-Starbuck '07

Hollis prison sentence upheld

Courtesy of Dartmouth College A state appeals court upheld the 24-year prison sentence originally given to Christopher Hollis for the 2005 fatal shooting of Meleia Willis-Starbuck '07 on Wednesday, according to court documents. Hollis' lawyers in the appeal had argued that the original judge in the case, Judge Vernon Nakahara of Alameda County Superior Court, had made errors in his sentencing which violated Hollis' constitutional rights, the documents said. The First District Court of Appeals in San Francisco upheld Vernon's original decision in a 3-0 vote. David Martin, Hollis' appeals attorney, told The Dartmouth on Thursday that Hollis may continue to appeal the sentence.


Appeals court upholds Hollis' 24-year sentence

A state appeals court upheld the 24-year prison sentence originally awarded to Christopher Hollis in the case of the 2005 fatal shooting of Meleia Willis-Starbuck '07 on Wednesday, the San Francisco Chronicle reported on Thursday. Hollis had argued that the original judge in the case, Judge Vernon Nakahara of Alameda County Superior Court, had made errors in his sentencing, which Hollis claimed violated his constitutional rights, the Chronicle reported. The First District Court of Appeals in San Francisco upheld Vernon's original decision in a 3-0 vote. Hollis was convicted in April 2008 with voluntary manslaughter, assault with a firearm and being a felon in possession of a gun, and was handed his 24-year sentence the maximum sentence that can be awarded for this charge in July 2008. Prosecutors had originally sought to convict Hollis of murder, but the jury in the case sided with the defenses' plea that the shooting had been unintentional, the Chronicle reported. In California, jury members determine the suspect's charges, but do not make any sentencing recommendations. The jury could have convicted Hollis of first-degree murder, second-degree murder or manslaughter, Hollis' attorney, assistant public defender Greg Syren, told The Dartmouth in July 2008. Syren told The Dartmouth at that time that he was disappointed with the sentence, adding that he had "thought the judge might exercise a little temperance." Hollis, 24, expressed remorse for his actions and pleaded for mercy from the judge in his original sentencing, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.


SEAD students bid farewell to College

Correction appended The 28 high school students who participated in Summer Enrichment at Dartmouth this year left campus Saturday morning after three weeks of classes and activities aimed at enabling them to apply to and succeed in college. The program culminated with a graduation ceremony on July 24, which included final presentations of the projects the students had been working on during their time at the College, according to assistant director Maggie Goldstein '10. "The smaller presentations were especially meaningful," said academic coach Emily Broas '11, whose student did her project on environmental conservation in the Upper Valley.