Maddie Garcia and Abby Cohen


Articles

More Than a Game

With spring break just around the corner, we know everyone’s thinking about that new bikini they ordered for Punta Cana and finally having time to catch up on “House of Cards.” But spring break also brings the start of March Madness. With Selection Sunday fewer than two weeks away, it’s time to make predictions, pick who will be this year’s Cinderella team and decide who’s the most trustworthy one in the friend group to organize the bracket pool.


More than a Game

The Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition, costing a steep $7.99 for a printed copy, sells over a million copies at newsstands each year. This is more than 10 times what a traditional weekly edition of Sports Illustrated sells — the kind that actually features athletes, statistics and sports news. What started as a five-page insert 50 years ago has since made Time Inc. over $1 billion in revenue. This year’s copy was released on Feb. 18.


More than a Game

Olympic recaps feature the latest controversial finish or result almost every day. Athletic competitions are always contentious — that’s just the nature of sports — but on such a grand stage, a minor glitch can easily become an international debacle. In Sochi, these controversies have ranged from humorous to crucial to the competition itself.


More than a Game

When live competition ends before 11s, following the Sochi Olympics is easier said than done. The nine-hour time difference between the games and Hanover means that there is little live action for students to watch. U.S. news networks knew this was going to be a problem for stateside viewers, and NBC Sports, in response, is broadcasting Olympic coverage nearly all day. However, for Dartmouth students using DarTV, this option is not available because DarTV does not have access to the network.


More than a Game

People bet on all sorts of things when the Super Bowl comes around — the halftime score, the coin toss, the MVP and, of course, the victor — but probably only a handful of people predicted the outcome we saw on Sunday night at Super Bowl XLVIII.


More Than A Game

When the Big Green men’s hockey team takes on Princeton this weekend, Thompson Arena will be filled to capacity with students anxiously awaiting the first Dartmouth goal, prepared to unleash a tennis ball frenzy. For the past three years we have perfected the act of smuggling in seemingly innocuous fuzz-balls into the arena.


More than a Game

At Dartmouth, where almost a quarter of the student body participates in a varsity sport, rumors of athletic pipelines and exclusive athletes-only information sessions are infinite. But is there any truth to them?


More than a Game

Jay Cutler signed a contract in early January with the Chicago Bears, guaranteeing him around $126 million over the next seven years. Seven years! The quarterback will be in his late 30s when the contract expires, much older than many of his teammates and competitors. Clearly the Bears want him so badly, despite his lackluster performance this season, that they are willing to pledge this salary for years to come, even with so many unknowns — possible injuries, the promise of new talent and effects of his aging.


More than a Game

Varsity athletes seem to get a lot of perks: free TruMoo, private yoga classes and a wardrobe of Nike or New Balance gear. But when non-athletes return to campus refreshed after the lengthy interim, they contrast sharply with varsity players, many of whom spent the break practicing and playing with their teams. Athletes have little flexibility to travel, get internships or spend time with family at home.


More than a Game

All term, we have been selecting topics for this column that we hope appealed to casual sports lovers, sports fanatics and people who only witness sports as they flip through television channels. While professional sports and varsity athletics take the spotlight most of the time, this article goes out to all the gym rats out there.