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Valdes: Keep Kresge

(02/25/21 7:00am)

It’s no secret that the physical sciences are one of the cornerstones of a Dartmouth liberal arts education. Historically, investment, faculty recruitment and generous undergraduate research grants have solidified the College’s position as a uniquely engaging place to receive undergraduate training in the sciences. The maintenance of the Kresge Physical Sciences Library was one of those important investments.


Arabian: Tune In or Be Tuned Out

(02/25/21 7:00am)

YouTube is a “Gutenberg revolution” of sorts. Since its launch in 2005, the site has provided its over two billion users with a platform to communicate their ideas, but unlike its predecessors — books, radio and television — YouTube has no barrier to entry. With just internet access and a camera, anyone from anywhere, with any opinion, can go viral. In recent years, conservative channels have flooded the platform with their political opinions. While these channels are not uniform by any means — they range from promoting libertarianism to shameless white supremacy — they are united in their opposition to a common enemy: the left.



Student Spotlight: Kevin Soraci ’18 finds beauty in the mundane in ‘The Comforts of Home’

(02/25/21 7:10am)

Studio art intern Kevin Soraci ’18 seeks to find beauty in the ordinary. Soraci’s exhibition “The Comforts of Home,” currently displayed in the Barrows Rotunda of the Hopkins Center for the Arts, features paintings of scenes from everyday life, capturing a space that can feel both familiar and peculiar.


A Hidden Pandemic: Preventing Sexual Assault During COVID-19

(02/24/21 7:20am)

Basements aren’t open. The flow of Keystone has ebbed. Moving shoulder to shoulder with strangers in a fraternity feels like a distant memory. With COVID-19 regulations changing the social scene on campus, some might assume that sexual violence is less likely to occur than in a normal term. But for many, these regulations add yet another layer of friction in reporting instances of violence at a time when the resources available to survivors might not be suited to the current context. 



Five Nights at Foco Late Night

(02/24/21 7:05am)

Freshman year, I used to trek, maskless, from the Choates to Collis almost every night between 9 p.m. and 12 a.m. until I was on a first-name basis with the late night smoothie makers. I discovered that the cheddar and sour cream Ruffles were practically a panacea, curing everything from midterm blues to insomnia. On “on” nights, Collis was the unofficial destination for end-of-night reconnaissance (“Where did you end up?” “Is that glitter?”) before Dartmouth’s loudest tucked themselves in with mac and cheese bites — the only thing God and Satan have ever agreed upon.





Teszler: Why So Low, Joe?

(02/23/21 7:00am)

Last December, people across the globe watched with hope as American nurses and doctors received their first COVID-19 vaccine doses — only to see our country fall flat on its face as the rollout stalled despite the U.S.’ place as an epicenter of international vaccine development. Now that President Joe Biden has taken office, vowing to “listen to the scientists” and “shut down the virus,” things must have turned around, right? Not so fast — while the federal government’s leadership has undoubtedly improved, the Biden administration's goals for vaccination are relatively tame, at least according to many health experts. Under former President Donald Trump, the federal government falsely promised a near-miraculous rollout of the vaccine. We now face the opposite problem — the Biden administration is underselling the vaccine. It’s time to ramp up expectations and engage in a full bore campaign to get doses into arms as fast as the vaccines are manufactured.


Dickman: Old Problem, New Urgency

(02/23/21 7:00am)

Dartmouth’s housing issue is far from new. The College has faced challenges since it began admitting women in 1972, which drastically increased the student population. Since then, the College has implemented the D-Plan, putting students on a constant rotation of off-terms and study abroad programs. The D-Plan somewhat thins out the on-campus population for any given term, keeping housing in check. Despite this fix, the underlying truth remains that there are more Dartmouth students than Dartmouth beds.



Bryant Ford named associate dean for community life and inclusivity

(02/22/21 7:10am)

Bryant Ford, formerly the associate director of the Counseling Center, has been named associate dean for community life and inclusivity. Ford, who assumed the position on Jan. 1, oversees the Office of Pluralism and Leadership, the Native American Program and the Tucker Center for Spiritual and Ethical Life.


Peter Roby ’79 appointed interim athletics director

(02/22/21 7:00am)

On Tuesday, Peter Roby ’79 assumed the role of the College’s interim athletics director, which he will serve as through June 2022. Roby, a varsity basketball player during his time at Dartmouth and athletics director at Northeastern University from 2007 to 2018, succeeded former athletics director Harry Sheehy, who announced his retirement earlier in February after months of controversy surrounding the elimination and eventual reinstatement of five varsity athletic teams. 





Moore: Don't Wall Off the Capitol

(02/22/21 7:00am)

Lawmakers and law enforcement officials are still grappling with the effects of the Jan. 6 seige of the Capitol, an event which highlighted a number of security failures at the Capitol building. Besides the non-scalable fencing which was recently erected around the building, there are now calls to install a seven-foot wall around the Capitol grounds. This reaction is a mistake and misses the point — we should be analyzing the police’s response instead.


Hopkins Center’s ‘Convergence’ Series highlights intersection of arts and science

(02/25/21 7:00am)

On Feb. 11-12, viewers from across the globe tuned into the Convergence Symposium, a two-day event hosted by the Hopkins Center for the Arts. The symposium, which featured presentations from professors and artists, kicked off the Hop’s “Convergence” series, a joint venture with the Irving Institute for Energy and Society focused on educating the Dartmouth community on the overlap between art and science. Over 300 viewers joined the event over Zoom.