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The Dartmouth
May 18, 2024 | Latest Issue
The Dartmouth

Before the Curtain: Arts on Campus Week 7

Both on campus and off, arts events include an A24 film at The Hopkins Center for the Arts and live music at Sawtooth.

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Friday, May 12

The Hopkins Center for the Arts will screen the film “John Wick: Chapter 4” at 7 p.m. in Loew Auditorium. Starring Keanu Reeves, this “shoot-’em-up thrill ride” of the action series’ fourth installment promises nearly three hours of intense stunt work and “gorgeous” imagery, as described by the Hop’s website. Tickets are available to buy on the Hopkins Center’s website at $5 for students and $8 for general admission.

The Dartmouth Rude Mechanicals will perform their spring show “Coriolanus” in Dartmouth Hall 105. “Coriolanus” by William Shakespeare follows the rise and brutal fall of Roman leader Caius Marcius Coriolanus. The Dartmouth Rude Mechanicals is Dartmouth’s student-run Shakespeare company. There will be two showings on Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. that are free and open to the public. 

Vermont-based soul musician Dave Keller will perform at Sawtooth at 9 p.m. Honored three times with Blues Music Award nominations for Best Soul Blues Album, Keller is now touring throughout the U.S. and Europe. Tickets can be purchased on Sawtooth’s website for $10. 

Saturday, May 13

The Hopkins Center will show the A24 film “Showing Up” in Loew Auditorium at 7 p.m. Directed by Kelly Reichardt, the film stars Michelle Williams as protagonist Lizzie. Through exploring Lizzie’s work as a ceramicist, the comedy questions what it means to make art — particularly from a social and economic perspective. Tickets are available to buy on the Hopkins Center’s website at $5 for students and $8 for general admission.

The Hood Museum of Art will host a “Hood Highlights Tour” from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. This in-person tour will take museum-goers through featured exhibits such as “¡Printing the Revolution! The Rise and Impact of Chicano Graphic, 1965 to Now” and “Social Surrealism and the Exploration of Identity.” The tour is open to the public and free of charge.

New Haven-based band Canopy will play a show at Sawtooth at 9 p.m. Canopy incorporates several genres into their music, including rock, psychedelic funk, blues and jazz. Tickets are available to order in advance on the Sawtooth website for $5. 

Sunday, May 14

The Hopkins Center will screen “Vermeer: The Greatest Exhibition” at 4 p.m. in Loew Auditorium. The film, directed by David Bickerstaff, is a behind-the-scenes look at the largest collection of Johannes Vermeer’s work ever compiled in one exhibit, with 28 of his remaining 35 pieces. The film includes commentary by the Rijksmuseum director and curators who organized the exhibit. Tickets are available to purchase on the Hop’s website at $12 for general admission and $5 for students. 

At 7 p.m. in the Cube, Displaced Theater Company will perform “The Antipodes” by Annie Baker. A production about seven writers attempting to write a story, “The Antipodes” provides each character with a turn to tell stories. Displaced Theater Company is Dartmouth’s first and only completely student-run contemporary theater company. “The Antipodes” has a content warning for explicit language, sexual themes and mentions of suicide. 

Wednesday, May 17 

Dartmouth Opera Lab presents “Cornucopia: Richness Abounds,” at 7:30 p.m. at Church of Christ at Dartmouth College. The end-of-term recital will feature the students of MUS 50.4, “Opera Lab” performing works from classical musical theater, popular and international canons, sung in English, Italian, French and Mandarin.  

At 8 p.m. in Rollins Chapel, Dartmouth’s Handel Society & Glee Club present an open rehearsal, the first of their two concerts. The next concert will occur at 8 p.m. on Thursday, May 18 at Rollins Chapel. The Handel Society consists of nearly 100 vocalists including Dartmouth students, staff and faculty, while the Dartmouth Glee Club has approximately 40 Dartmouth student choir singers. For this performance, the Handel Society and Glee Club will collaborate with professional soloists and instrumentalists to perform Requiem Masses by French composers Fauré and Duruflé. Tickets are available for purchase on the Hopkins Center’s website for $15 and $5 for Dartmouth students.

Bluegrass musician Stash Wyslouch will perform at Sawtooth at 8 p.m. Wyslouch is a singer and songwriter known for his “flat-picking” on the guitar — a popular bluegrass and folk technique. Guitarist Billy Strings commended Wyslouch’s ability to break “musical boundaries by doing things that just don’t seem possible on acoustic instruments.” Tickets are available on the Sawtooth website for $12. 

Thursday, May 18

From 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. in Irving 80, the Virtual Publics in the Memosphere — a Humanities project composed of a First Year Seminar, Memetics Working Group, Conference and Exhibit — will host a Q&A with Ryan Milner. The discussion will focus on Milner’s 2016 publication “The World Made Meme” and the ways in which internet cultures have changed. 

From 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the Wren Room in Sanborn House, “How to Do Things with Media: Interventions in Nineteenth-Century Studies” — a Venn Grant funded workshop within the Leslie Center for the Humanities — will present a public keynote panel. The panel will feature Richard Menke, Gabriella Safran and Richard Taws.  

In collaboration with the Dartmouth Asian American Studies Collective as a part of the Asian Diaspora on Screen series, the Hopkins Center will screen the film “First Cow” at 7 p.m. Directed by Kelly Reichardt, “First Cow” is a Western set in the 1820s focused on the friendship between the kind-hearted cook, Cookie (John Magaro), and King Lu (Orion Lee). Tickets can be bought on the Hopkins Center’s website for $8 and $5 for Dartmouth students.  

The Hood Museum will host the Manton Foundation Annual Orozco Lecture “From Terra Nova to Aztlán: The Politics of Territory in Latinx Printmaking” from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the museum’s Gilman Auditorium. According to The Hood’s website, the University of Notre Dame assistant art history professor Tatiana Reinoza will speak on the current “nativist and xenophobic discourses” prevalent in printmaking, “critiquing the medium’s historical complicity in the colonization of the Americas.” The talk will also consider José Clemente Orozco’s mural “The Epic of American Civilization.” This event is free to the public and no tickets are required.

Before the Handel Society & Glee Club’s second concert, Director Filippo Ciabatti will host a pre-show discussion at 7 p.m. in Baker Berry Library. This 30 minute talk will provide an opportunity to learn more about the group’s spring program before the concert at 8 p.m. in Rollins Chapel. This talk is free of charge and does not require a ticket.