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The Dartmouth
April 19, 2024 | Latest Issue
The Dartmouth

Before the Curtain: Arts on Campus Week 5

This week, arts events in Hanover include a performance of the play “Fairview” at the Hopkins Center for the Arts and Clarion Choir’s “All-Night-Vigil” at Rollins Chapel.

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Friday, April 28

At 8 p.m. in Wilson 301, the theater department will put on its opening performance of “FAIRVIEW.” According to the Hopkins Center for the Arts website, Jackie Sibblies Drury’s 2019 Pulitzer Prize-winning play is “an interactive theatrical experience exploring the lenses through which we view other communities.” The performance follows the Frasiers, a middle-class Black family. In the play, Beverly, the protagonist, plans a birthday for her grandmother, which results in “complicated” family dynamics to surface. “FAIRVIEW” is a sharp exploration of family drama and “the insidiousness of white supremacy.” Tickets are free and available through the Hopkins Center’s website.

At 9 p.m., The DoBros will perform at Sawtooth Kitchen. Based out of central New Hampshire, The DoBros’s style — often described as “farm-funk and dirt-grass” — is a synthesis of country, blues, bluegrass, rock, funk and Americana. Tickets are $5 and available on the Sawtooth Kitchen website.

Saturday, April 29

At 4 p.m., Sawtooth Kitchen will host Tommy Crawford for the final Saturday afternoon of his springtime residence. Crawford, who lives in White River Junction, will take the stage to play traditional folk tunes and original songs for all ages. Tickets to his final performance are free and available on the Sawtooth Kitchen website.

The theater department will put on its second performance of “FAIRVIEW” at 8 p.m. in Wilson 301. Tickets are free and available on the Hopkins Center’s website. 

Sunday, April 30

At 4 p.m., the Hopkins Center will screen the film “All the Beauty and the Bloodshed” (2022) in Loew Auditorium. According to the Hop’s website, Laura Poitras’s Oscar-nominated documentary is a “spellbinding look at the person, portfolio and politics of legendary photographer Nan Goldin.” In her work, Goldin focuses on LGBTQ+ visibility and activism, from the AIDS crisis in the 1980s to her criticism of the Sackler family for their role in the opioid crisis. “All the Beauty and the Bloodshed” follows Goldin’s journey “from Polaroids in dingy hotel rooms to die-ins at the Guggenheim.” Tickets are available on the Hopkins Center’s website and are $8 for general admission and $5 for students.

Wednesday, May 3

At 8 p.m. in Rollins Chapel, the Clarion choir will perform “All-Night Vigil” by Sergei Rachmaninoff in celebration of the Russian composer’s 150th anniversary. The Clarion Choir, conducted by Steven Fox ’00, is a three-time Grammy nominee and one of New York’s leading professional choirs. The choir has received numerous accolades for its recordings and tours throughout Europe and Russia. “All-Night Vigil” is a “quiet, reflective and deeply moving set of vespers that exudes light as it gradually moves toward daybreak.” Tickets are available on the Hopkins Center website. They are $35 for general admission and $10 for Dartmouth students.

Thursday, May 4

At 7 p.m. in Loew Auditorium, the Hopkins Center will screen the film “Revenge” (1989), directed by Ermek Shinabaev. The film is a part of the new wave of Kazakh cinema, which began during the late-Soviet era. It tells the story of a Korean boy who was raised  to avenge the murder of his half-sister killed before his birth. “Revenge” encapsulates the sense of “national upheaval and intergenerational trauma” experienced by Kazakh filmmakers. Tickets can be purchased on the Hopkins Center’s website and are $8 for general admission and $5 for students.