Mirror Asks

by The Mirror Staff | 2/26/20 2:00am

mirror-asks-rgb
by Samantha Burack / The Dartmouth

Do you cook for yourself?

Caris White ’23: When I’m at home I cook for myself fairly often, but at Dartmouth, I don’t have a kitchen, so no. 

Charlie Ciporin ’23: No. Even though I live in the Fayes basement and have a kitchen about 30 feet down the hall from me, I still never do it.

Anne Johnakin ’23: At home I cook a lot, but not so much here.

Christina Baris ’22: Not at college. Unless you count making ramen at 2 a.m. cooking.

Kate Yuan ’23: If instant oatmeal counts, then yes.

Have you ever run out of DBA or meal swipes? 

CW: Nope. 

CC: I went about $50 negative on the Ivy Unlimited plan all ’23s were forced onto last term, but I’m doing great on the 80 this term.

AJ: Not yet.

CB: Tragically, I will most likely be out of DBA by the end of this week.

KY: No. 

How have you experienced food insecurity? 

CW: I’ve been fortunate to have never experienced food insecurity.

CC: I think I’ve been privileged enough to not experience food insecurity. However I’ve seen it in my community at home, despite it being relatively affluent. It showed me it really can happen anywhere.

AJ: I can’t say I have experienced food insecurity. I’m privileged to have consistent, reliable access to food.

CB: I have not experienced it first-hand, but I am aware that it is unfortunately a prevalent issue.

KY: No.

How does food represent your culture? 

CW: To be honest, the idea of ~American~ food is pretty much just a conglomeration of dishes taken from around the world. I wouldn’t say food is very representative of my culture (that of a Caucasian American).

CC: As someone who is Jewish, I can say latkes and kugel define a large part of how I interact with that culture. Although I’ve also seen Rosh Hashana parties with bacon-wrapped shrimp, so make of that what you will.

AJ: I don’t know about my culture as a whole, but there are a lot of family recipes that we’ve passed down. Those are great way to help keep me connected to my family.

CB: I love recreating my grandma’s recipes. It makes me feel more connected to the generations before me. 

KY: Food means everything in Chinese culture. It’s a demonstration of love, family, fortune and more.

What is your favorite cuisine? 

CW: Vietnamese food!

CC: As basic of an answer as this is, I have to say Italian. I do love a good Turkish kebab, though.

AJ: Thai. 

CB: Italian. If I could live solely off of pizza and pasta, I would. 

KY: Latin American.