Three new businesses open in Hanover

by Eliza Gallant | 9/26/19 2:05am

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J. McLaughlin opened a store in downtown Hanover earlier this month.

by Sydney Gilman / The Dartmouth

This term, three businesses — AroMed Essentials, Han Fusion and J. McLaughlin — opened in downtown Hanover. Additionally, Still North Books & Bar — an independently-owned bookstore set to replace the Dartmouth Bookstore — will open later in the term.  

The last several months have seen the closure of several Hanover businesses, including Orient Chinese & Japanese Restaurant and the Dartmouth Bookstore, leaving noticeable vacancies in their respective storefronts.

Operating in the building formerly occupied by the Dartmouth bookstore, J. McLaughlin opened its doors on Sept. 16. According to its website, J. McLaughlin is “a brand that offers upper-end clothes with a ‘neighborhood feel.’”  

Hanover manager Jennifer Dunham said that the store hopes to attract Dartmouth students’ business, specifically for professional outfits for interviews. Dunham said that there was a need for an upper-end and classic women’s and men’s clothing store in Hanover and believes that J. McLaughlin fits that description. 

Dunham acknowledged that many college students may not see J. McLaughlin as a store at which they would regularly shop, but said that the store supplies standard clothing that she believes many young college students will like. She added that the Hanover community has been “extremely welcoming.” Currently, Dunham added that she is the store’s only employee and is looking to hire some Dartmouth students.

In August, AroMed Essentials opened on Allen Street. AroMed, which has two other locations in Vermont, sells a variety of products, such as essential oils, cannabidiol, jewelry and yoga supplies. 

AroMed owner Lauren Andrews said she chose to open a Hanover location to provide support for Dartmouth students and offer a “wellness resource” that did not previously exist in downtown Hanover. Andrews added that she has worked to educate people about cannabidiol and ensures that all of her products are “green, plant based and free of any synthetic chemicals.” According to Andrews, AroMed’s products provide remedies for insomnia, brain fog, cold and flu, pain and anxiety — many of which plague college students. Andrews encourages people to buy her products because her staff is very well-trained and cares deeply about its customers. She believes that the Hanover location will appeal both to the baby-boomer generation, as well as college students. She added that consumers should be very cautious as to where they are buying their cannabidol products and that purchasing these products from online retailers is a “very bad idea.” 

Han Fusion, which serves authentic Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese and Japanese food, opened on Sept. 24. 

In addition to these newly-opened businesses, Still North Books & Bar is expected to open late this fall. 

Bookstore founder Allie Levy ’11 said that she decided to open a bookstore because she “couldn’t imagine Hanover without one” and believes that bookstores are essential for a community. According to Levy, Still North Books & Bar will sell books, food and drinks. She said she hopes that students will come to the store to meet with professors and work off campus. 

Levy decided to create a hybrid bookstore and bar so that Hanover has a space that is “not work or home — just a place to spend time with the rest of the community.” She added that she hopes the bookstore will be a safe space for everyone and also a space in which students can host events. She said she strongly believes that small and local businesses contribute to Hanover’s culture and community and hopes that students will support her business, as well as the other small businesses of Hanover.

Correction appended (Sept. 26, 2019): This article originally stated that Wadeane Kunz is the owner of Han Fusion restaurant. Kunz is not the owner, and a section that originally contained an interview misattributing Kunz as the owner has been removed from the online version of this article.