Laura Sim


Articles

Mirror

Students share stories of work and life at the College

“You don’t realize something when you don’t know what to look for," Emily Chan '16 said. "I first noticed when I was on my [language study abroad] with other people. They were really nice, of course, but you see the obvious differences — half the group could afford to do a lot more than you can. Money can actually be real constraint for a lot of people, and it was just interesting that I myself had been so ignorant about it. Then I couldn’t stop seeing or noticing"


Students celebrate the art of speaking with contest

On Thursday, students, faculty and members of the Dartmouth community gathered in the Treasure Room in Baker Library — a space with books lining the walls and light filtering in through stained glass windows — for the Benjamin F. Barge and Class of 1866 Prizes for Oratory Speech contest, an annual event celebrating the oratory arts within the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric.


Users and creators react to Dartmouth’s first MOOC

By engaging with students through the virtual screen during the College’s first massive online open course, “Introduction to Environmental Science,” environmental studies professor and course lead Andrew Friedland said that he and his team frequently found themselves surprised by the universality of environmental science, despite students’ varied perspectives.


Arts

Burns, College enjoy fruitful bond

Over the years, Ken Burns has repeatedly visited the College, most recently screening his third episode of “The Roosevelts” at the Hopkins Center on July 13. The screening marks the fifth consecutive summer that Burns, who sits on the Hop’s board of overseers, has opened an advance screening at the College, according to a Hop press release.


Arts

Heralded songwriter Bird to perform at Hop

Bringing his signature arrangement of curiously synthesized plucks, loops and whistles to Hanover, Andrew Bird and the Hands of Glory will perform at Spaulding Auditorium on Thursday


Arts

Concert will bring culture, spirit

Seamless and organic, Ricardo Lemvo and his Los Angeles-based band Makina Loca blend together different music styles found across the world — transcending any single culture, time, place or creed. Lemvo and Makina Loca will come to campus for the first time to play a free concert on the Green at 5 p.m. Thursday. The band features rhythms inspired by Africa and Cuba with a pan-African sound.


Arts

Frame of Reference

When Cornelius Gurlitt, now 81 years-old, traveled across the Swiss border by train in 2010, a routine customs check led to an incredible find. The son of a prominent Nazi was traveling with 9,000 euros, prompting a police investigation that ended with the discovery of a priceless collection of drawings and paintings allegedly taken from war-torn Germany. Stored in his 1000-square-foot Munich apartment, Gurlitt had a collection worth an estimated $1.3 billion, including works by Matisse and Picasso. German prosecutors removed over 1,400 works of art and objects from his apartment in 2012.


Arts

Frame of Reference

On Feb. 3, Brooklyn artist Tony Matelli’s lifelike sculpture “Sleepwalker” was installed outside of Wellesley College’s campus museum to promote the artist’s show, “New Gravity,” which will run through July. The sculpture features a middle-aged man in tight white underwear briefs, with eyes closed and arms outstretched like he is sleepwalking. After its installation, students circulated a petition demanding the sculpture’s removal.


Arts

Frame of reference

In the wee hours of March 18, 1990, two men disguised as police officers executed the largest art heist in history. In total, the men made off with works by Degas, Manet, Rembrandt and Vermeer, tearing paintings off the walls or slicing canvases from their frames. Today, empty frames mark the place of these priceless works, still missing from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. Although the statute of limitation for the theft has expired, the works have never been returned.


Arts

Frame of reference

Some of the most beautiful buildings in the world are home to the most beautiful works of art. The Getty in Los Angeles, the Guggenheim in New York and the Louvre in Paris all come to mind. Perhaps this is why critics and architects jumped to their feet when the Museum of Modern Art recently announced last Wednesday that it would raze the American Folk Art Museum in New York City.