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Verbum Ultimum: Dartmouth’s New Hope

(09/16/22 8:00am)

This summer, the College announced that Sian Leah Beilock would be taking over as President of the College following current President Phil Hanlon’s retirement at the end of this academic year. This news represents an important milestone in Dartmouth’s over 250-year history, as Beilock is the first ever woman to serve in this position. This Editorial Board joins the many students who celebrated the long overdue decision to elect a woman to lead the College, and we believe that Beilock’s background as an accomplished cognitive science researcher, a previous college administrator and a mother make her particularly well-qualified for this appointment. Additionally, her extensive educational experience at public institutions provides her with an outsider perspective that makes her uniquely qualified to tackle some of the most salient issues on Dartmouth’s campus.


Lane: It’s Time to Jumpstart Eastern Europe’s Future

(09/15/22 8:05am)

Many of us have seen the photos and videos coming out of the Kharkiv region of Ukraine over the past few days: abandoned tanks on roads, left-behind munitions, burnt-out wrecks of equipment littering fields and streets. Ukrainian forces have pulled off an incredible feat that hopefully will bring a swift end to Putin’s senseless and pointless war. But the fact of the matter is that wars do not truly end when peace returns. Wars end when societies have been healed, and that will take years. Now is the time to start planning to help heal Eastern Europe.


Hall: Biden’s Student Loan Bailout is a Bad Move

(09/15/22 8:00am)

President Joe Biden recently announced $10,000 in federal student loan forgiveness for borrowers earning less than $125,000 annually, or for couples earning less than $250,000, through a recent executive order. In addition, the plan also cancels up to $20,000 for Pell Grant recipients. Pell Grants are provided by the federal government — they do not have to be repaid, but recipients often take out additional loans to pay for higher education. Biden’s plan would provide complete debt cancellation for approximately 15 million borrowers and provide some relief for up to 40 million people. In addition to the bailout, the moratorium on student loan payments — a policy put in place at the beginning of the pandemic — was once again extended through the rest of the year. This marks the seventh extension of the payment pause. 


Allen: Life After Hours

(09/13/22 8:00am)

Life for Dartmouth students is busy and, in many ways, unpredictable. This is not news: Students take two or three classes — maybe even four — all the while juggling jobs, clubs, sports, friendships, family and all the other pressures of adulthood. Our days start early and end late, and despite our best intentions and meticulous planning, random inconveniences can happen without warning.






Lane: America, the Titanic

(08/19/22 8:00am)

In spring 2021, I wrote my first column for this paper. I argued that if President Biden didn’t do more to pass his agenda, young voters would have little reason to vote for his party in the 2022 midterm election. Those midterms are now fast approaching, and I saw it fit to reexamine developments since then. My point in that column was limited to commenting on whether Democrats would see success with young voters in the midterms. I’d now like to expand on it. If President Biden and the Democratic Party cannot demonstrate to voters that they both can and will solve ordinary voters’ economic problems, America’s democracy will further, and perhaps irreparably, erode.


Macri: 46 States Offer Early Voting. New Hampshire Still Won't?

(08/12/22 8:00am)

In a democracy that cares about consent of the governed, everybody loves voting. Who wouldn’t? Voting empowers every citizen to express their voice. We the people elect our political leaders; we the people chart out our own destiny; we the people get to decide our own bright future. As an American, you deserve the opportunity to vote.


Ratekin, Sherin and Taylor: The Uncertainty of Medical Training Post-Roe

(08/12/22 8:05am)

This September, fourth-year medical students around the world will spend countless hours perfecting their applications for residency positions. In order to practice medicine in the United States, students must obtain impeccable grades throughout their undergraduate years, demonstrate competence and compassion during four years of medical school and learn innumerable clinical skills during their three to seven years of residency. Only then are they able to start their careers as physicians. While this journey can be difficult and overwhelming, it is also incredibly rewarding, offering us the chance to help people through some of their most vulnerable and formative moments in life. 


Dixon: It's Not A Crime To Be Conservative

(08/05/22 8:00am)

I grew up in a liberal area of Maryland. I was raised by two liberal parents. I went to a liberal school. You get the idea — a young liberal man raised in a cookie-cutter suburban neighborhood. My first experience with true, cold-blooded conservatives was when a bunch of 7-year-olds ran by and screamed “Fuck Joe Biden” when I was hosting a Democratic booth at the state fair. Really transformative stuff.


de Wolff: Yes, This Is a Recession

(07/29/22 8:00am)

For the second straight quarter, the United States’ economy has shrunk, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. What does this mean? Conventional wisdom would say the economy is in a recession. But statements coming from the upper echelons of our government, such as Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen’s denial of this fact, would lead one to believe that this is not the case. Their motivations for doing this are simple: If the economy is doing poorly, that bodes ill for the ruling Democratic Party come November. Official recognition of this fact would mean an admission of guilt, but no amount of hemming and hawing can disguise the fact that the economy is approaching a dangerous place. Instead of trying to cover up their mistakes, the Biden administration should own up to the situation it is in, or else they will be soundly rebuked in November. 


Roodnitsky: The College's ratio of students to mental health providers is abysmal and it shows

(07/22/22 8:05am)

Many of us have heard of the “duck syndrome” at Dartmouth: It’s week five, midterms are crashing into you, stress from extracurriculars has piled up, looming deadlines approach, the fear of finding that internship for your next off term peaks and quite frankly, you sleep more in Baker-Berry Library than in your dorm. And yet, you must appear calm above the surface of the water, a graceful duck making its way smoothly around the pond. If someone were to peek underneath, however, they would see webbed feet frantically paddling away. That’s how much energy the duck must exert to keep from drowning. Nobody would know from its appearance that the duck is just barely remaining afloat. 



Menning: An Intuitive Path Towards a Bigger Green

(07/15/22 8:05am)

Dartmouth owns 27,000 acres of forestland in northern New Hampshire. A gift from the state legislature in 1807, the Second College Grant has since become a beloved piece of Dartmouth’s heritage. The area is beautiful; Bear Brook and the Diamond River wind in open wetlands beneath forested mountains, hosting habitat for moose, whitetail deer, grouse, black bears, otters and beaver. The College currently manages the area for sustainable timber production and recreation, and the Dartmouth Outing Club maintains three cabins on the property that students can use from matriculation through life after graduation. While the Grant clearly plays to the “crunchy” aura so quintessential to life at Dartmouth, it may also provide a high-reward model to achieve one of the College’s most pressing priorities: a low-carbon future. 


Lane: Busting America's Corporate Drug Cartel

(07/15/22 8:00am)

The fact that insulin prices in the United States are ridiculous should surprise no one given how often the hormone makes headlines. High insulin prices are also a uniquely American problem — prices here are dramatically higher than in any other developed nation. According to the Department of Health and Human Services, insulin costs around 10 times more in the U.S. than the average across 32 other OECD countries. During his presidential run before the 2020 election, Bernie Sanders even went so far as to lead a bus full of Type 1 diabetics up to Canada to purchase insulin for a tiny fraction of what it costs in the U.S. He has a point — the price discrepancy is nonsensical.



de Wolff: End Test-Optional Admissions

(07/08/22 8:05am)

For Dartmouth’s Classes of 2025, 2026 and 2027, the admissions office has instituted a “test-optional” policy, in which applicants may choose whether to submit standardized test scores as part of their application, but will not be penalized if they do not. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions’ website claims that “it is not the moment to restore the testing requirement” due to the pandemic. Recently, standardized testing has come under fire for two different reasons: access and equity. But these attacks do not hold up under scrutiny. Recent advancements in public health and technology, as well as extensive research, all show that these arguments are either inaccurate or wholly unfounded. Ultimately, Dartmouth will be less able to accept students who will succeed academically if it stays test-optional. The College should once again require applicants to submit standardized test scores. 




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