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Review: Joji’s ‘Nectar’ feels forgettable save for a few standout tracks

(10/19/20 6:00am)

Over the past few years, former YouTube star George Miller — better known as Joji — has become one of the most popular internet artists in the mainstream world of music. Given his background, a career in serious music sounds unlikely; under his YouTube personality “Filthy Frank,” Joji was known for his dark, gross-out humor and his wild alter ego, Pink Guy. However, Joji’s transition from fringe YouTube comedian to mainstream R&B artist was more successful than anyone could have imagined.


Review: ‘Enola Holmes’ offers fresh, female-focused take on Sherlock Holmes

(10/15/20 6:00am)

“Enola Holmes” — one of the newest entries to Netflix’s catalog, based on the young adult series by Nancy Springer — is a fun, adventurous and action-packed film that brilliantly reinvents the Sherlock Holmes franchise. Directed by Harry Bradbeer and written by Jack Thorne, “Enola Holmes” centers on the life of the youngest Holmes sibling, Enola (Millie Bobby Brown), and her journey to reunite with her missing mother while forging her own sense of freedom. While the film contains some elements of the classic Holmes mysteries, it adds a new twist with its focus on social activism and female intellect. From start to finish, the film successfully creates a world that places a strong-willed heroine center-stage, offering a timeless lesson on female empowerment.



Review: ‘Mexican Gothic’ is a Victorian Gothic novel for now

(10/08/20 6:00am)

Silvia Moreno-Garcia’s New York Times best-seller “Mexican Gothic” is a lush, moody story brimming with horror and mystery. With all the trappings of a Victorian novel, “Mexican Gothic,” which was released in June, calls upon notable doomed heroines in the literary canon, from Ophelia in “Hamlet” to Cathy in “Wuthering Heights,” in order to place readers in its melodramatic prose. “Mexican Gothic” is your favorite Brontë novel, but better.


Hopkins Center promotes student engagement through #SmallScreenFun

(10/08/20 6:10am)

Since April, the Hopkins Center for the Arts’ virtual cinema program, #SmallScreenFun, has provided Dartmouth community members with the opportunity to stream films and join live Q&As featuring filmmakers, film scholars and celebrity guests. This term, the Hop has given students a greater role in the program, allowing them to act as moderators and ask guests questions.



‘Make It At Home’ virtual workshop series offers creative outlet for students

(10/01/20 6:00am)

The Hopkins Center for the Arts has offered workshops to students since the 1940s, and quarantine has by no means put an end to this practice. According to ceramics instructor Jennifer Swanson, workshops turned to a virtual format during the summer term, with instructors mailing students supplies and guiding the classes over Zoom. Titled the “Make It At Home” workshop series, the virtual program includes workshops focusing on woodworking, ceramics and jewelry-making skills. 



Review: Fleet Foxes’ 'Shore' offers reflection on changing times

(09/28/20 6:00am)

With their self-titled 2008 debut, Fleet Foxes established themselves as an indie folk outfit with achingly sincere, pastoral lyrics and a penchant for vocal harmonies. And unlike many folk rock artists emerging out of the late 2000s, they have remained fresh, while managing not to make a major departure in style on any of the three albums they have released since their debut. After a six-year hiatus, their third album “Crack-Up” dove headfirst into progressive folk, with denser instrumentation, longer songs and unorthodox song structures. With “Crack-Up,” Fleet Foxes proved that they could work within their established style to create a challenging, dense album of music that defied accessibility. With their newest album “Shore,” released on Sept. 22, Fleet Foxes have proved the opposite: Their music can be equally powerful with simpler instrumentation and more accessible, catchy songs. 


Review: Yaa Gyasi's 'Transcendent Kingdom' illuminates the Black immigrant experience

(09/24/20 6:10am)

Yaa Gyasi’s follow-up to her American Book Award-winning 2016 debut “Homegoing” is “Transcendent Kingdom,” a novel alternating between past and present in the life of Gifty, a Ghanaian-American neuroscience Ph.D. candidate and former self-proclaimed “Jesus Freak.” Throughout the book, Gifty, who studies impulse control in mice, reexamines what led her to a life of empiricism after growing up in a deeply religious immigrant family in the Bible Belt. Grappling with Gifty’s experiences growing up “sticking out like a sore thumb” in her predominantly-white town and “as Ghanaian as apple pie,” the novel is both accessible and urgent. 



Q&A with Frances Cha ’07, author of ‘If I Had Your Face’

(09/21/20 6:05am)

Frances Cha ’07’s debut novel “If I Had Your Face” has been making waves in the literary world. The Guardian praised the novel — a story about four young women navigating the rigid cultural hierarchies, impossible beauty standards and plastic surgery craze of contemporary Korean culture — as a “fizzing, grisly debut.” The Washington Post even likened the book to Bong Joon-Ho’s Academy Award-winning “Parasite.” 


Boycotting ‘Mulan,’ Disney’s latest venture into human rights violations and corporate greed

(09/17/20 6:10am)

In late 2018, the production crew of “Mulan,” the latest soulless Disney live-action remake, began filming in the Xinjiang province of northwest China, home to the Uighur people. At that same time in Xinjiang, the Chinese Communist Party continued to sharply expand internment camps for ethnic Uighurs, camps that had already incarcerated up to one million members of the predominantly-Muslim minority group. 




Review: ‘Indian Matchmaking’ balances tradition and modernity, despite controversy

(08/21/20 6:30am)

When I first watched “Indian Matchmaking,” I didn’t frown upon the premise of the show. Instead, I laughed at hilarious scenes between Indian American families redolent of my family. Released on July 16, this Netflix original is produced by the Oscar-nominated documentary filmmaker Smriti Mundhra, who communicates a middle way between arranged marriages and modern dating. “Indian Matchmaking” has polarized viewers, with some seeing it as perpetuating colorism, sexism and the caste system, while others perceive it as a lighthearted take on contemporary Indian culture that destigmatizes arranged marriages. I am in the second camp and let me tell you why. 




Review: Taylor Swift stuns with the mature melancholy of ‘folklore’

(07/31/20 6:00am)

Just when I thought Taylor Swift had surpassed every semblance of an expectation, she proved to be even more of a superwoman. The release of her eighth album, “folklore,” on July 24th comes only 11 months after the cheerful and flowery “Lover.” Written and recorded entirely in quarantine, “folklore” is a testament to the singer’s creativity as a musical powerhouse. “Folklore” stuns with its ethereal beauty and maturity, expressed through intelligent lyrics and gentle, haunting melodies. 


Arts courses and extracurriculars prepare for the upcoming academic year

(07/24/20 6:15am)

Radio plays, at-home workshops and smartphone recordings of theater scenes are just some of the many adaptations Dartmouth community members are employing to maintain arts education despite the challenges imposed by COVID-19. Technology has proved critical in these plans, allowing students to learn, perform and rehearse together across time zones. 




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