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Review: Billie Eilish’s ‘Happier Than Ever’ Juxtaposes Confidence and Vulnerability

(08/13/21 5:00am)

Billie Eilish revolutionized pop through the institution of a dark, eclectic style in her debut studio album “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?” Between the tantalizing whispers and her penchant for contrasting harsh instruments with soft vocals, Billie Eilish united reality and fantasy to tell the story of teenage trauma through lucid dreams. Winning a whopping six Grammys in 2020, Eilish skyrocketed to mainstream success and mass fame at just 18 years old.


Review: 'The Green Knight’s' strange tale proves worthy

(08/06/21 5:00am)

“The Green Knight” by David Lowery has been one of my most anticipated films of this year ever since I first saw the trailer for it in February of 2020 — a lifetime ago, in other words. I was excited to see it for a few reasons, and not just because of the fact that I’m a film minor and, as such, I’m contractually obligated to fawn over any and all A24 movies. I was excited because of my love for fantasy, my love for dark takes on well-trodden genres and because I greatly enjoyed Lowery’s last film, “The Old Man and the Gun.”




Review: ‘Call Me If You Get Lost’ sees Tyler, the Creator return to his roots, now more matured and refined

(07/30/21 5:04am)

When Tyler, the Creator released his album’s new single, “Lumberjack,” on June 16, it was unclear which version of him we would get on “Call Me If You Get Lost,” his sixth studio album. Tyler’s discography has seen a major swing from aggressive and alienating lyrics to exploring introspective, vulnerable themes. The album’s first single gave us the old, aggressive Tyler; it boasted of wealth over an abrasive sample from the pioneering horrorcore group Gravediggaz, but with humor and grace infusing the lyrics. Its sound is comparable to his earlier albums, but in a way that is more mature and secure, foreshadowing the feeling of the album that would follow.


Summer performing arts groups offer creative outlet for variety of students

(07/30/21 5:02am)

Every year during sophomore summer, a variety of performing arts groups on campus — from a capella to dance to improvisation — open up spots for temporary members. With generally more free time and an eagerness to take advantage of all the College has to offer, sophomores usually take this opportunity to challenge themselves to acquire a new set of skills or return to an activity they stopped upon coming to Dartmouth. Though the pandemic paused this summer tradition last year, with fewer COVID-19 restrictions on campus now, students are revitalizing it and enjoying the College’s gradual transition into normalcy. 


Q&A: Torrey Peters GR’13 on her debut novel ‘Detransition, Baby’

(07/30/21 5:10am)

“Detransition, Baby,” Torrey Peters GR’13’s debut novel, has been making waves in the publishing industry. It was longlisted for The Women’s Prize and honored as a New York Times Editors Choice. Notably, it is one of the first novels by a transgender person to be published by a big five publishing house — in this case, One World, an imprint of Penguin Random House. 


Review: Disney Plus’ ‘Loki’ is ripe with potential but needed more time to develop

(07/23/21 5:02am)

When the Marvel Cinematic Universe announced a wave of new television shows, it was no surprise that the charismatic brother of Thor, Loki, secured a series all to himself. Played by the beloved actor Tom Hiddleston, Loki won over viewers with his debut in 2011’s “Thor.” Despite his introduction as a villain, MCU fans have watched him develop into a reformed hero. Disney Plus’ new show “Loki” follows this evolution and expands on Loki’s character development by exploring the meaning of free will, faith and identity. 




Review: Marvel’s ‘Black Widow’ is Thrilling, but Lacks Depth Natasha Deserves

(07/16/21 5:04am)

Marvel’s “Black Widow” weaves a touching story about abuse, family and survival. The movie tackles the difficult theme of the dehumanization of young women through fantastic acting, writing and, of course, fighting. In the larger context of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, though, “Black Widow” still feels like too little, too late for the titular character. After a decade as a superhero sidekick, fans can’t help but feel that Black Widow deserved more.


The Hood hosts virtual public workshop on expressive writing

(07/16/21 5:09am)

On July 15, the Hood Museum of Art sponsored a workshop on expressive writing, the sixth installment of the virtual series. The event was co-facilitated by the founder of the Writer’s Center of White River Junction Joni Cole and Hood teaching specialist Vivian Ladd. The event, which took place Thursday evening over Zoom, was free and open to the public. 



Preview: Big Red Machine to feature various collaborators on new genre-fluid album

(07/09/21 5:00am)

Big Red Machine, a duo composed of The National’s Aaron Dessner and Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon, is releasing its second album “How Long Do You Think It’s Gonna Last?” on Aug. 27. The album is the latest installment in a burst of creative energy and wide-ranging collaboration, sparked by the pandemic, from Dessner and Vernon. Leading up to the album drop, they have released three singles that offer a glimpse into the experimental compilation. 


Nugget Theaters reopen, pandemic restrictions still in place

(07/09/21 5:05am)

On June 18, downtown Hanover’s Nugget Theaters reopened for in-person screenings, showing three movies each day on weekends. The theater reopened with COVID-19 restrictions and protections in place. These include plexiglass partitions in the ticketing area, required masks for patrons when not enjoying concessions, 50% occupancy limits in each theater, extra cleaning and sanitization, assigned seating for patrons and a brand new $800,000 HVAC system. 


Hood Museum acquires over 6,000 vintage Hollywood photographs

(07/02/21 5:05am)

The Hood Museum of Art has completed a project to acquire over 6,000 Hollywood photographs from the John Kobal Foundation, an organization based in the United Kingdom dedicated to collecting and furthering photography in remembrance of its namesake. The photographs acquired by the Hood feature major stars and scenes from 20th century North American film such as Buster Keaton, Lillian Gish, and Marlon Brando. They offer a glimpse into parts of Hollywood often overlooked — including the photographers themselves.


Q&A: Frank J. Barrett, Jr. on his new book, ‘Lost Hanover, New Hampshire’

(07/02/21 5:00am)

Frank J. “Jay” Barrett Jr. has always had a passion for architecture and a love for the town of Hanover. As a former Hanover Historical Society president and an architect by profession, Barrett has himself made contributions to chronicling the town’s history, even recommending buildings to the National Register of Historic Places. As a writer he has thoroughly chronicled Hanover’s rich history in the three volumes he has already published on the history of Hanover. 


Review: Bo Burnham’s ‘Inside’ vividly explores an existential crisis

(06/25/21 6:00am)

Since garnering mass attention with his music-based performances on YouTube at just 16, Bo Burnham has been an iconic presence in the comedy community. He has an impressive discography of surprisingly introspective songs, such as “Art is Dead” and “Lower Your Expectations,” which discuss the harrowing problems of comedic brilliance and leave the listener cackling while also questioning society. With his newest Netflix special “Inside,” Burnham builds on his catalogue of self-reflective songs as he struggles to understand his place in a convoluted world.



Machine Gun Kelly reaches new depths in 'Tickets to My Downfall'

(05/24/21 6:00am)

Machine Gun Kelly’s newest album transcends his former rap concentration and launches the artist into his newest exploration: pop-punk. Based heavily on popular music of the early 2000s, “Tickets to My Downfall” marks the genre’s return to popularity with a new edge that makes it stronger than before. With over 66 million streams, Kelly has seen more commercial success from this album than any of his previous work, proving his versatility by successfully making the difficult jump to a new genre.




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