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Trends: Jennette McCurdy’s memoir revives conversations about child entertainment industry horrors

(09/26/22 6:05am)

Jennette McCurdy’s memoir “I’m Glad My Mom Died,” released on Aug. 9, has made its way onto the bestseller table in bookstores — complete with a pink and yellow cover and a photo of the former “iCarly” star smiling with a pink urn. While the memoir’s title may present as a mere shock tactic, the title points to a fundamental truth: The death of her mother, Debra McCurdy, brought Jennette McCurdy peace. In writing the book, she said she has achieved a catharsis possible only in the absence of her mother, who disapproved of all her creative pursuits. With her mother dead, McCurdy is finally free to admit: “I absolutely prefer writing to acting. Through writing, I feel power for maybe the first time in my life.”  


Review: ‘Don’t Worry Darling’ may have something to worry about

(09/26/22 6:00am)

Since its inception, Olivia Wilde’s highly anticipated thriller “Don’t Worry Darling” has taken the internet by storm, unleashing an avalanche of rumors on social media — including, most notably, lead actress Florence Pugh’s alleged feud with Wilde and lack of involvement with promotion. Despite this drama, I entered an empty Nugget Theater with optimism. The film has an admittedly impressive cast — with notable names like Harry Styles, Gemma Chan, Chris Pine and more — and is directed by the celebrated Olivia Wilde, acclaimed for her debut movie, “Booksmart.” I wondered: When stripped of its social-media buzz, will “Don’t Worry Darling” still succeed?


Review: Harry Styles makes stage his own at Madison Square Garden

(09/19/22 7:05am)

Madison Square Garden seemed like the perfect place to see Harry Styles. With the opulence and reputation his name commands, only a renowned stadium could fit the bill. Nearing the end of his 15-night residency and with charisma to spare, Styles himself may as well have called me himself and told me to purchase tickets. Or at least that is what I tell myself to justify the exorbitant price. A vibrant performer and even more personable guy, Styles’s banter with the crowd and powerful performance completely transformed MSG into Harry’s House. 


Review: ‘Navalny’ presents a bold story of resistance

(09/19/22 7:01am)

In the HBO Max and CNN Films original documentary “Nalvany,” director Daniel Roher investigates the attempted assasination of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny. The film — which premiered at the January 2022 Sundance Film Festival — focuses on the issues of democratic reform, information warfare and spreading the truth. Russia’s current war with Ukraine and complex political relations with other countries make this documentary a critical and timely watch.





Student Spotlight: Exit 13 brings an eclectic, fun sound to sophomore summer

(08/19/22 6:00am)

At the beginning of sophomore summer, Exit 13 was formed — becoming the newest addition to Dartmouth’s student-driven music scene. Named after the Hanover exit on Route 91, the band features lead vocalist and guitarist Sami Lofman ’24, keyboard player Amethyst McKenzie ’25, saxophone player Devontae Lacasse ’24, bassist Christian Caballero ’24 and drummer Kirusha Lanski ’23, who also plays in the student band Shark. 


Review: Netflix’s ‘Persuasion’ fails to live up to its name

(08/19/22 6:05am)

My bedside table is stacked tall with romance novels. This summer I’ve raided my local bookstore on many occasions to find a new story to fall into while sitting on the beach, the train or the porch of my childhood home. My enthusiasm for cheesy tales of love has even manifested in binging romances on streaming services — everything from “The Summer I Turned Pretty” to “Purple Hearts” to“Bridgerton” dominates my list of recently-viewed shows and films. 


Review: Elton John demonstrates breadth of talent and successful discography at Gillette Stadium concert

(08/12/22 6:00am)

I am a sucker for a concert. If anyone notable is playing within three hours of me, I can’t help but go. I’m attracted to the energy, the lights, the live music, the food  — and my wallet hates me for it. So, when my friend texted me last minute about seeing Elton John in Foxborough, Mass. on July 27, suddenly the interview I had the next day, my upcoming midterm and my discussion post due in two hours all fell to the wayside. Nosebleed tickets were purchased and an outfit was thrown together. Piling into my beloved Subaru with four other Dartmouth students, we began the three-hour drive to Gillette Stadium. Throughout the drive, we couldn’t hold in our excitement as we listened to John’s greatest hits and made a brief Chick-fil-A stop on the way.


Behind the Scenes: Student Bands at Dartmouth

(08/05/22 5:00am)

When a fraternity announces that a student band is playing, you’ll typically see a rush of people attempting to get into the venue. Inside, you’ll find a sea of students crammed together as an audience, with fellow students shredding, singing and grooving along to their own live music. With such an entertaining product, most students overlook the two essential questions: How does this whole scene work and what goes into each performance? As someone who has played in all four campus bands this summer — Exit 13, Gibberish, Tightrope and The Stripers — I’m well equipped to answer.


Dance Theatre of Harlem completes third summer residency at the Hop

(08/05/22 5:05am)

This summer marks the last year of Dance Theatre of Harlem’s three-year residency at the Hopkins Center for the Arts. The collaboration, which began in 2020, has included master classes, pop-up shows, collaboration with theater classes, a visit to the Hood and previews of The Hazel Scott Project, which developed over the course of the past three summers. 


Students design, create mural in Irving Institute atrium

(07/29/22 5:00am)

In fall 2021, a team of students received a challenge: How could they make the energy efficiency of the Irving Institute for Energy and Society more visible to everyday visitors of the building? In response, the team commissioned a mural, which a group of student artists then conceptualized in the spring. The mural is now visible to the public in the atrium of the Irving Center. 


Q&A with Hopkins Center executive director Mary Lou Aleskie

(07/29/22 5:05am)

With plans for the renovation of the Hopkins Center for the Arts underway, executive director of the Hop Mary Lou Aleskie has committed to serving in the role for another term. Aleskie began in the position in 2017, and during her first term, the College announced an $88 million dollar expansion to the Hop. The Dartmouth sat down with Aleskie to discuss her role as executive director and what she hopes the renovation of the Hop will bring to the local arts community.


Review: The Dead & Company’s concerts at Citi Field perfectly concludes their summer tour

(07/22/22 5:00am)

The Grateful Dead have been the soundtrack to all my best memories — the ride to and from school every day, my dad singing “Brown-Eyed Women” to me while making pancakes every Sunday morning, driving to Atlanta for my first Dead & Company concert in 2017. I have been a Deadhead since birth; both my parents are avid fans and have been playing their music since before I could walk. Now that I’m grown and my parents’ love for the band has evolved into my own, riding about six hours on the Dartmouth Coach to New York to see Dead & Company — the Grateful Dead legacy band featuring icons Bob Weir, Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann, along with John Mayer, Oteil Burbridge and Jeff Chimenti — was an easy sacrifice to make. 


Silkroad Ensemble with Rhiannon Giddens perform ‘Phoenix Rising’ at the Hop

(07/22/22 5:00am)

Thirteen Silkroad Ensemble artists performed “Phoenix Rising” with artistic director and Grammy Award-winning musician Rhiannon Giddens on Tuesday at the Hopkins Center for the Arts. The ensemble — composed of artists with diverse backgrounds and unique musical experiences — performed a program of 10 pieces, including new commissions, reimagined arrangements and two world premieres. The works drew inspiration from the North of Scotland, folk music from the American South, Japanese court music and Iranian folk music. 


Q&A with ‘Female Complaints’ writer Kate Mulley ’05

(07/15/22 6:00am)

Playwright Kate Mulley ’05 recently collaborated with musical artist Tina deVaron to write the musical “Female Complaints,” which they brought to Dartmouth to workshop as part of VoxLab — a theater residency held each summer for alums to develop their projects. From July 4 to July 10, a select group of students in the course THEA 65, “Summer Theater Lab,” brought Mulley and deVaron’s vision to life for the first time. According to the show’s promotional materials, “Female Complaints” is a musical that tells the story of the highly skilled abortionist Inez Ingenthron in the 1900s, who becomes the target of the San Francisco district attorney due to her illegal abortion practices. The Dartmouth talked to Mulley about the process of writing and workshopping “Female Complaints,” as well as its relevance in the context of the recent Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.


Review: ‘Stanley Tucci: Searching for Italy’ provides a view of Italy’s culinary diversity

(07/08/22 5:00am)

In the second season of the CNN original documentary series “Stanley Tucci: Searching for Italy,” actor, writer and producer Stanley Tucci continues his travels across Italy to learn about the nation’s cuisine and culture. Over the course of four episodes, the four-time Emmy Award winner and Academy Award nominee brings his audience across different regions of Italy  — Venice, Piedmont and Umbria — with the final episode taking place in London. Tucci focuses not only on each region’s signature dishes, but the rich history and legacy of these dishes. 


Musings from the Museums of Washington D.C.: Portraits, Photos, Stories

(07/08/22 5:05am)

Over the last month, various students interning in Washington D.C. have spent time hopping from museum to museum, reveling in the National Gallery of Art, the Hirshhorn and the Smithsonian museums as arbiters of history. Gazing at unfinished portraits of U.S. presidents in the National Portrait Gallery or indulging in the abstract modern exhibits of the Hirshhorn have brought to life the historical anecdotes previously heard in class, according to some students. 





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