Search Results


Use the fields below to perform an advanced search of The Dartmouth 's archives. This will return articles, images, and multimedia relevant to your query.




315 items found for your search. If no results were found please broaden your search.



Review: ‘The Satanic Verses’ continues to provoke controversy and violence

(11/14/22 7:00am)

On Aug. 12, 2022, world renowned Indian-British-American author Salman Rushdie was stabbed repeatedly in an assassination attempt at a conference in New York. He was slated to present his thoughts on freedom of speech as an exiled author in America. He was initially exiled from Iran and targeted due to his depiction of the Prophet Muhammed in his book “The Satanic Verses,” which was released in 1988. Growing up in a liberal Muslim family, Rushdie now firmly considers himself to be an atheist — a conversion which is not taken lightly in the Islamic faith. 


Review: ‘Amsterdam’ shows the importance of community in the midst of uncertainty

(11/14/22 7:05am)

David O. Russell’s latest film, “Amsterdam,” is — at its core — a historical comedy and conspiracy thriller that dives into the power of friendship and loyalty. Set primarily in 1930s New York against a backdrop of social and racial inequality, the film touches on issues of post-traumatic stress disorder, white supremacy and the rise of American fascism. Though the overarching theme is a comforting message of the value or relationships in uncertain times, this is lost due to the film’s poor pacing and timeline which is difficult to follow. 


Review: ‘It Starts With Us’ takes readers through the pain of new beginnings

(11/07/22 8:00am)

“It Starts With Us” is Colleen Hoover’s sequel to her best-selling novel and BookTok sensation, “It Ends With Us.” The sequel begins directly after “It Ends With Us” and brings the reader through the intricacies of life after divorce and domestic abuse. “It Starts With Us” is a lighter read than its predecessor,  allowing the reader to experience Atlas and Lily’s relationship as they navigate divorce, found family and starting a new life after abuse. In many ways, Hoover presents a “second-chance” romance that alternates between Atlas’s and Lily’s points of views. “It Ends With Us” must be read first in order to fully understand the magnitude of some of the trivial events in “It Starts With Us.”


Review: ‘House of the Dragon’ captures the magic of Westeros with casting and design

(10/31/22 6:05am)

As an avid “Game of Thrones” fan, I have been counting down the minutes to its highly anticipated prequel, “House of the Dragon,” since its announcement in 2019. Like many “Game of Thrones” fans, I was wildly disappointed by its unfulfilling finale that left me irrationally angry; a rushed ending that throws away about eight seasons of character development is no way to reward fans for their dedication. Even so, I was excited to restart my obsession with the “Game of Thrones” world — now with new characters, romances and drama. 


Review: ‘Midnights’ is a testament to transformation

(10/24/22 6:05am)

Like many others, I have grown up with each new Taylor Swift album. Her new album “Midnights,” released on Oct. 21, is no exception. With “Midnights,” Swift transitions out of the acoustic sound which characterized her three most recent releases. The album felt different from my expectations, but upon the second listen I genuinely enjoyed it. It’s a unique sound and aesthetic for Taylor Swift, establishing a truly new era. The songs span a wide variety of topics so that nearly everyone can relate to something in the album. 


Review: Noah Kahan’s ‘Stick Season’ beautifully captures the complexities of homesickness

(10/17/22 6:00am)

Growing up in a desert city, I never thought that I would be so deeply connected to an album written about a small town in Vermont. Yet, Noah Kahan’s “Stick Season,” released on Oct. 14, perfectly embodies the transitional period between fall and winter in New England — something Dartmouth students are all too familiar with. For the Dartmouth community, this album is already a community treasure: Kahan graduated from Hanover High School and draws on his upbringings in Strafford, Vt. and Hanover in the album.  Whether a New England native or someone who has never visited, Kahan has created widespread nostalgia for the region through the album. 


Review: ‘Do Revenge’ signals the brave cinematic start of ‘Hitch-Tok’

(10/10/22 6:10am)

Jennifer Kaytin Robinson’s “Do Revenge” is a complex film filled with contradictions. The film contains a serious premise, but treated playfully. The story feels classic and yet the spin is modern. But, the further you analyse “Do Revenge” and the climate it’s set in, the more sense it starts to make.


Review: “Hold the Girl” Holds Listeners’ Attention and Hearts

(10/10/22 6:00am)

On Sept. 16, Rina Sawayama released her second studio album, “Hold the Girl,” containing 13 songs. The album’s reception immediately reflected the acclaim the Japanese-British artist gained following the release of her first album, “Sawayama.” “Hold the Girl” debuted at number three on the U.K. Album Charts and marked Sawayama’s first entry on the U.S. Billboard 200. Although not quite a chart topper yet, Sawayama has amassed an audience of dedicated fans, and after listening to this new album, I can safely count myself among them. 


‘Maḏayin’ makes history at the Hood

(09/30/22 6:00am)

On Sept. 3, the Hood Museum of Art debuted its newest exhibition: “Maḏayin: Eight Decades of Aboriginal Australian Bark Painting from Yirrkala.” Organized by the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia in partnership with the Bukularrngay Mulka Centre in Australia, “Maḏayin” makes history as both the first major exhibition of Aboriginal Australian art in the United States and the largest display of Aboriginal Australian art in the Western Hemisphere in 30 years. 


Review: ‘Don’t Worry Darling’ may have something to worry about

(09/26/22 6:00am)

Since its inception, Olivia Wilde’s highly anticipated thriller “Don’t Worry Darling” has taken the internet by storm, unleashing an avalanche of rumors on social media — including, most notably, lead actress Florence Pugh’s alleged feud with Wilde and lack of involvement with promotion. Despite this drama, I entered an empty Nugget Theater with optimism. The film has an admittedly impressive cast — with notable names like Harry Styles, Gemma Chan, Chris Pine and more — and is directed by the celebrated Olivia Wilde, acclaimed for her debut movie, “Booksmart.” I wondered: When stripped of its social-media buzz, will “Don’t Worry Darling” still succeed?


Review: Harry Styles makes stage his own at Madison Square Garden

(09/19/22 7:05am)

Madison Square Garden seemed like the perfect place to see Harry Styles. With the opulence and reputation his name commands, only a renowned stadium could fit the bill. Nearing the end of his 15-night residency and with charisma to spare, Styles himself may as well have called me himself and told me to purchase tickets. Or at least that is what I tell myself to justify the exorbitant price. A vibrant performer and even more personable guy, Styles’s banter with the crowd and powerful performance completely transformed MSG into Harry’s House. 



Review: ‘Navalny’ presents a bold story of resistance

(09/19/22 7:01am)

In the HBO Max and CNN Films original documentary “Nalvany,” director Daniel Roher investigates the attempted assasination of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny. The film — which premiered at the January 2022 Sundance Film Festival — focuses on the issues of democratic reform, information warfare and spreading the truth. Russia’s current war with Ukraine and complex political relations with other countries make this documentary a critical and timely watch.


Review: Netflix’s ‘Persuasion’ fails to live up to its name

(08/19/22 6:05am)

My bedside table is stacked tall with romance novels. This summer I’ve raided my local bookstore on many occasions to find a new story to fall into while sitting on the beach, the train or the porch of my childhood home. My enthusiasm for cheesy tales of love has even manifested in binging romances on streaming services — everything from “The Summer I Turned Pretty” to “Purple Hearts” to“Bridgerton” dominates my list of recently-viewed shows and films. 


Review: Elton John demonstrates breadth of talent and successful discography at Gillette Stadium concert

(08/12/22 6:00am)

I am a sucker for a concert. If anyone notable is playing within three hours of me, I can’t help but go. I’m attracted to the energy, the lights, the live music, the food  — and my wallet hates me for it. So, when my friend texted me last minute about seeing Elton John in Foxborough, Mass. on July 27, suddenly the interview I had the next day, my upcoming midterm and my discussion post due in two hours all fell to the wayside. Nosebleed tickets were purchased and an outfit was thrown together. Piling into my beloved Subaru with four other Dartmouth students, we began the three-hour drive to Gillette Stadium. Throughout the drive, we couldn’t hold in our excitement as we listened to John’s greatest hits and made a brief Chick-fil-A stop on the way.


Review: The Dead & Company’s concerts at Citi Field perfectly concludes their summer tour

(07/22/22 5:00am)

The Grateful Dead have been the soundtrack to all my best memories — the ride to and from school every day, my dad singing “Brown-Eyed Women” to me while making pancakes every Sunday morning, driving to Atlanta for my first Dead & Company concert in 2017. I have been a Deadhead since birth; both my parents are avid fans and have been playing their music since before I could walk. Now that I’m grown and my parents’ love for the band has evolved into my own, riding about six hours on the Dartmouth Coach to New York to see Dead & Company — the Grateful Dead legacy band featuring icons Bob Weir, Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann, along with John Mayer, Oteil Burbridge and Jeff Chimenti — was an easy sacrifice to make. 


Review: ‘Stanley Tucci: Searching for Italy’ provides a view of Italy’s culinary diversity

(07/08/22 5:00am)

In the second season of the CNN original documentary series “Stanley Tucci: Searching for Italy,” actor, writer and producer Stanley Tucci continues his travels across Italy to learn about the nation’s cuisine and culture. Over the course of four episodes, the four-time Emmy Award winner and Academy Award nominee brings his audience across different regions of Italy  — Venice, Piedmont and Umbria — with the final episode taking place in London. Tucci focuses not only on each region’s signature dishes, but the rich history and legacy of these dishes. 


Review: ‘Book Lovers’ is enemies to lovers without lovers or enemies

(07/01/22 5:00am)

There are many ways to begin a love story. Don’t believe me? Just walk into any bookstore’s romance section. You will stumble across microgenres like friends to lovers, co-workers to lovers, childhood neighbors to lovers, sister-in-law to lovers (hello Bridgerton season two!), strangers to lovers, fake lovers to lovers, fake lovers to lovers but for young adults — the list goes on. But — in accordance with the truism that the opposite of love is not hate, but rather indifference — the crown jewel plot line of contemporary romance is enemies to lovers. While I don’t personally get it — call me old fashioned but I’d rather my significant other like me instead of abhor me (been there done that!) — enemies to lovers is a long time favorite. From “Pride and Prejudice” to “When Harry Met Sally,” as a society, we cannot  get enough of weirdly charged meet-cutes and declarations of hatred that turn into passionate kisses. I mean, anyone with a soul can admit that Elizabeth telling Darcy that he is the last man on Earth she could ever marry (while he stares longingly at her in the pouring rain) is damn good cinema. Who among us can forget Julia Stiles’s character in “Ten Things I Hate About You” reading a poem addressed to her enemy, played by Heath Ledger, that ends with “But mostly I hate the way I don’t hate you, not even close, not even a little bit, not even at all.” No one, that’s who. Enemies to lovers is all about the tension! The unspoken feelings! The miscommunication! The passion! The way they don’t hate each other, not even at all! The crux of enemies to lovers is a simple reversal of expectations. It really doesn’t take much. But Emily Henry makes that easy equation look pretty difficult in her third novel “Book Lovers.” 


​​Review: Kendrick Lamar delivers a more inward focus with his new album

(07/01/22 5:05am)

On his last three albums, Kendrick Lamar has explored a range of lofty topics. On “Good Kid, m.A.A.d City” (2012), he used his experience as a teenager in Compton, CA., to make a general statement about growing up in impoverished urban areas. In “To Pimp a Butterfly” (2015), Lamar wrote about the experience of black people in America more broadly. In “DAMN.” (2017), Lamar wrote about emotions in a more abstract way; he was still presenting himself as a larger-than-life figure, one who many listeners treat as a role model. But now, after a five year wait, Kendrick finally makes an attempt to present himself only as a human being with faults and vulnerabilities on his new album “Mr. Morale and the Big Steppers.”


“Harry’s House” is an intimate diversion from Styles’ previous work

(05/26/22 6:05am)

Driving back from New York on the morning of the album’s release, “Harry’s House” was the soundtrack of my return to campus. With nothing but long highways and sleeping passengers — coupled with Waze occasionally interrupting the soft crooning of Harry Styles — I was able to give this album the attention it deserved, which is what has made me appreciate its many nuances and subtleties so much.




Advertise your student group in The Dartmouth for free!