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Editors' Note

(04/28/21 6:00am)

As we approach the midway point of the term, old routines are starting to solidify. The same long lines pile up in Collis each morning, and by the afternoon, students have migrated to the Green to bask in the sun after a surprisingly snowy start to spring. We end the day people watching in Foco or gearing up to finally finish that problem set we’ve been procrastinating all week. Maybe these routines give us comfort — something we can rely on in the midst of all this uncertainty.


Q&A: Art History Professor Mary Coffey on the Police Violence Symposium

(04/28/21 6:10am)

From April 5-11, the Hopkins Center for the Arts held a symposium that brought together acclaimed speakers to discuss the issue of police violence and its ties to racial injustice. Since the symposium, Derek Chauvin’s trial has ended with his conviction of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. However, the end of the trial did not mark the end of police violence, nor the discourse surrounding it, in America; it remains an ongoing issue. This week, The Dartmouth sat down with art history professor and symposium co-organizer Mary Coffey to ask her to reflect on the event as well as provide insight into what students can do to remain engaged in the fight against police violence. These answers reflect Coffey’s personal views, and she noted that she avoids pushing any specific views onto her students.


Vaccination Stories: Dartmouth Students Share Their Vaccination Experiences

(04/21/21 6:10am)

When New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu announced that starting April 2, COVID-19 vaccinations would be available to New Hampshire residents over the age of 16, Dartmouth students scrambled to schedule their appointments. The initial excitement of the news quickly subsided, however, when the governor added that this expanded eligibility would not include out-of-state college students. Though Sununu ultimately reversed this policy and said that non-residents would be allowed to get the vaccine in New Hampshire beginning April 19th, the weeks between the two announcements resulted in a range of frustrating, confusing and stressful COVID-19 vaccination experiences within the Dartmouth community.


Out of the Loop: '24s and Dartmouth Slang

(04/21/21 6:05am)

Dartmouth is known to all for its community and culture of tradition. The homecoming bonfire, the BEMA twilight ceremony for freshmen, the annual campus-wide snowball fight, First-Year Trips — the list of cherished traditions is long. But perhaps no tradition is as ubiquitous in the everyday lives of Dartmouth students as Dartmouth slang. It’s no secret that students have a proclivity for embracing an expansive, unwritten dictionary of lingo, be it in reference to spaces like the dining hall (“Foco”) and the first floor of the Baker-Berry Library (“Blobby”) or to attributes of other students (the dreaded label of “facetimey”). 


Editors' Note

(04/21/21 6:00am)

Whoops! Following the recent snowfall, it appears our verdict in last week’s issue that “spring has sprung” may have been a bit premature. However, an April snow shower is nothing novel to those native to New England, and for some, one last snowfall might even have come as a welcome anomaly. Regardless, with midterms now in full swing and extracurricular commitments building up, we most likely won’t be spending much time outside anyway. 


Muslim Students Recount Challenges, Call for Increased Awareness during Holy Month of Ramadan

(04/21/21 6:15am)

On Monday, April 12, Muslim students and faculty in the Upper Valley awoke and enjoyed suhoor — a traditional meal eaten early in the morning before starting a day of fasting. Then they headed off to practice, logged onto their Zoom class or began the mountain of work that was due the next day —  such is the Dartmouth experience. Yet, unlike the large majority of our community, they were fasting — refraining from eating, drinking and engaging in habits such as smoking, engaging in sexual activity and drinking alcohol — until the sun fell back behind the mountains. At that point, they broke their fast with the iftar, another ritualistic, spiritual meal. For all Muslims observing the holy month of Ramadan, this is their routine for the next 30 days. 



More Than Just Money

(04/14/21 6:15am)

Of those recently admitted to Class of 2025, 17% are first-generation college students — a record-high for Dartmouth — and 48% identify as “Black, Indigenous or other people of color.” While these statistics demonstrate the College’s attempt to diversify the student body, they do not properly highlight the struggle behind the application process for first-generation, low-income students.


From the Common App to COVID-19: The Power of Empathy

(04/14/21 6:10am)

As the incoming Class of 2025 makes their decisions on where to attend college, I can’t help but think back to my own college application journey just over two years ago. As an early decision applicant to Dartmouth, I didn’t have to grapple with choosing which school to attend, but I can look back at how much has changed since crafting my own applications. 



Editors' Note

(04/14/21 6:00am)

Week three already? Once again, we have slipped past the simpler times of introductions and syllabi right into the depths of midterms — some things never change. But the sunny skies and unseasonably warm weather of this Hanover spring almost make us forget about that paper we haven’t started or those readings yet to be opened. Almost. 





Q&A: Dartmouth Professors Answer our Questions about Teaching on Zoom

(04/07/21 6:05am)

It has been over a year of remote learning and as more members of the Dartmouth community receive vaccinations, there is an air of hope following the College’s announcement of an expected return to in-person classes for fall 2021. Though there have been many discussions around what the loss of in-person classes has meant for students — academically, socially, emotionally — less attention has been paid to what the change has meant for professors. 


Editors' Note

(04/07/21 6:00am)

As they say, spring has sprung. Near campus, April showers are in full swing, promising a lush and flowerful May. The crisp New England breeze is cut by the warm sunshine, and students are flocking to the Green. While many of us have settled into our new homes, be they on campus or nearby in the Upper Valley, some have returned back to old ones. The sudden start of a new term always catches us by surprise, but as we have done time and time again, we will eventually catch up on that little assignment that got away — don’t worry, we won’t tell anyone.


Comparing Campus COVID-19 Restrictions: How Does Dartmouth’s Reopening Plan Compare to Peer Schools?

(04/07/21 6:10am)

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, colleges across the country have been tasked with an unusual challenge: how to balance protecting public health, looking out for student mental well-being and preserving the college experience. Dartmouth has been criticized by some students for its strict limitations on socialization, small selection of in-person classes and unequal term prioritizations across class years. But is there a way for colleges to avoid these issues without sacrificing community safety? Let’s look at how Dartmouth’s reopening plan compares to its peer schools. 


The Things We Carry

(03/31/21 6:20am)

Even during a normal year, Dartmouth students are a mobile group. Between off-terms, study abroads and our extra-long winter break, many students find themselves changing housing situations relatively often. However, as COVID-19 continues to restrict the stability and availability of on-campus housing, students’ movements in and out of campus have shifted from periodic to constant.


Q&A: Medicine Professor Elizabeth Talbot on What You Need to Know About the COVID-19 Vaccines

(03/31/21 6:10am)

Earlier this month, the College announced a partnership with the state of New Hampshire to begin vaccinating eligible students and employees for COVID-19. The vaccines are soon expected to become even more widely available, as Gov. Chris Sununu announced that all New Hampshire residents 16 and older will be able to register for a vaccine appointment starting April 2, this Friday. The Dartmouth spoke with Elizabeth Talbot, Geisel School of Medicine professor, infectious disease physician at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and New Hampshire deputy state epidemiologist, about vaccine efficacy and the implications for Dartmouth students.