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‘My Hope for Dartmouth’: Q&A with Professor Peter Tse ’84

(11/02/22 6:25am)

Professor Peter Tse ’84 first came to Dartmouth as an undergraduate in the fall of 1980 and — after pursuing graduate studies and research in his field — returned to the College in 2001 as a professor of psychology. Earlier this term, Tse wrote an email to the Dartmouth administration presenting some suggestions to improve morale at Dartmouth. Tse’s ideas range from updating our mascot (or lack thereof) to hosting regular cookouts on the Green and updating the core curriculum for first-year students. Tse sat down with The Dartmouth to talk about the problems he diagnosed in his email and the solutions he sees as important to Dartmouth’s future.





‘He was really a hero to me’: President emeritus James Wright remembered for his kindness, impact

(11/01/22 9:15am)

As Dartmouth’s 16th president, James Wright left a lasting impact on the College and the people within it. He focused on diversity and inclusion, raised $1.3 billion in a fundraising campaign that transformed the College with new facilities and expanded College faculty and financial student aid for students. Among his family and friends, he is remembered for his kindness and undying support for veterans. 


Dining costs steadily rise over past five years in response to inflation, market factors

(11/01/22 9:08am)

With fruit cups costing $6.75, smoothies priced at $7.25 and a single packet of sour cream going for $1.25, many students are frustrated with the food prices at Dartmouth Dining locations. While both the price of food on campus and the cost of meal plans have increased with national inflation, the dining dollar allowance within each meal plan has not changed since 2018, according to an email statement from Dartmouth Dining director Jon Plodzik. The value of meal equivalencies has also stagnated since 2018, Plodzik added.


Town passes rental ordinance updating safety requirements, mandating inspections

(11/01/22 9:10am)

At a town hall on Oct. 17, the Hanover Selectboard unanimously passed an ordinance that updates safety requirements for rental units and will mandate inspections of rental properties. Within the next three years, every rental property in Hanover will undergo an inspection, Hanover town manager Alex Torpey said. The inspections will be relevant for students who live in off-campus housing units — many of which, he added, are substandard.


Class of 1989 Pollination Project builds pollinator habitats around Upper Valley

(11/01/22 9:00am)

The Class of 1989 Pollination Project, which began as an alumni outreach initiative, has united various campus groups around the issue of sustainable ecosystems, according to vice president of the Class of 1989 and project founder David Hammond ’89. The goal of the project is to increase the amount of habitat for pollinators like moths, butterflies and bees, which play an essential role in the ecosystem by growing patches of wildflowers around the Upper Valley, Hammond said. 



Halloween horror against Harvard: Football unlikely to repeat as Ivy League champion

(10/31/22 5:10am)

In a battle that was closer than the final score indicated on Saturday, Harvard University defeated Dartmouth 28-13, putting a damper on the Big Green’s Homecoming weekend. Beneath sunny skies and a stadium packed with 8,735 fans, the Big Green kept it close early on — scoring both of its touchdowns in the second quarter before failing to score again.



Reimagining the Arts at Dartmouth: The Hopkins Center Renovations

(10/28/22 6:05am)

Since 1962, The Hopkins Center for the Arts has provided a space for creativity, collaboration and community at Dartmouth. As one of the largest buildings on campus — standing at 175,000 square feet — the Hop is preparing to undergo a major renovation guided by the design firm Snøhetta. The renovation aims to create spaces that are welcoming and accessible, as well as introduce more places to gather and experience the arts as a community.




Racially-motivated attack against South Asian student prompts town hall, reflection among South Asian communities

(10/27/22 9:05am)

On Sept. 17 on Main Street, an older, white man directed slurs at three Indian students and physically attacked biochemistry Ph.D. candidate Abubakhar Khan — who is from Lahore, Pakistan. The racially-motivated assault spurred a Graduate and Professional School Town Hall meeting about racially-charged violence on Sept. 27, with Safety and Security director Keiselim Montás and Diversity and Inclusion vice president Shontay Delalue, who discussed the ramifications of the assault on the South Asian community and safety on campus. In addition to Montás and Delalue, panelists at the town hall included psychiatrist Da-Shih Hu from the counseling department and moderator and dean of the Guarini School of Graduate and Advanced Studies Jon Kull ’88.


Rockefeller Center hosts CNN political commentator Harry Enten ’11

(10/27/22 9:25am)

On Oct. 25, the Rockefeller Center for Public Policy partnered with the University of New Hampshire’s Carsey School of Public Policy to co-host an event with Harry Enten ’11, a senior data reporter for CNN. Enten spoke about his experiences as an analyst and reporter, answered questions about the state of American politics and offered his insights about the upcoming midterm elections. 


Q&A with Aaron McKenna, winner of NIH New Innovator Award

(10/27/22 9:10am)

Aaron McKenna, who is a researcher and professor for the Geisel School of Medicine, recently received the National Institutes of Health New Innovator Award, which provides $1.5 million in funding. The New Innovator Award aims to fund breakthrough research by young researchers. McKenna studies cell fate mapping with his lab to investigate the nature of cell development errors that precipitate common medical conditions, such as cancer, neurologic diseases and autism spectrum disorders. McKenna worked as a software engineer for the Broad Institute of Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology  before earning his Ph.D. at the University of Washington in genomics in 2017. 



Editors' Note

(10/26/22 6:00am)

And just when it felt like we were getting into the swing of things, week 7 at Dartmouth hit like a swift kick to the jaw. (In one editor’s case, a literal kick to the jaw.) Cloudy skies and the passing of peak foliage might feel like a gray start, but as the skies turn sunny and our alumni come roaring back, we’re sure the rest of Homecoming week has festive things in store.


Homecoming presents unique experiences for transfer students

(10/26/22 6:05am)

Dartmouth fall is in full swing. By this point in the term, you have likely been subjected to incessant Instagram stories of fall foliage — myself admittedly included in the onslaught of pretty pictures of leaves. You have probably seen Sun God’s eerie strolls around campus, witnessed fraternity pledges complete their “technically-not-hazing” pledge tasks (I personally enjoyed the elevator bellboy in Baker-Berry Library) and enjoyed the muted calm of a campus after the social apocalypse of rush. You may have also sensed the nervous trembling of the Harvard football team as it prepares for its Oct. 29 battle against the Big Green. 




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