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Verbum Ultimum: Fatal Mismanagement

(09/30/22 8:00am)

Dartmouth, to put it very mildly, is going through a rough patch. Last Monday, the Department of Safety and Security sent a campus-wide email alerting to the assault of a graduate student on Main Street. On Tuesday, The Dartmouth reported that the assault was being investigated as a hate crime by the Hanover Police Department. On Wednesday morning, interim Dean of the College Scott  Brown sent a campus-wide email announcing the death of Joshua Watson ’22, who died in his hometown of Indianapolis on Aug. 27 while on leave from the College. At 6:19 p.m, the Office of the President at the College followed up by expressing “outrage” over the graduate student attack. Just two hours later, at 8:21 p.m., we learned of the death of a second classmate, Sam Gawel ’23, who died by suicide in Hanover on Wednesday. And just yesterday, College President Phil Hanlon announced that Luke Veenhuis, a Thayer researcher, died over the weekend. 





Milan: ‘Sorry, already gone’

(09/30/22 8:00am)

When foreign graduate students arrive in Hanover for the first time, they don’t just contend with the culture of a new country. They must untangle Dartmouth’s housing bureaucracy — and it’s hard to say which is more confusing. Stories abound of international students that have been charged exorbitant rates for Upper Valley apartments — some of them little better than slums — while getting no help from Dartmouth’s Real Estate Office. And the College’s entire housing policy is oriented toward undergraduate housing.


Teszler: Turn Down the Heat

(09/29/22 8:00am)

So here we are again: a week of compounding tragedies — and the feeling that very little of substance is going to change. As a student body, the outpouring of grief for the loss of both Joshua Watson ‘22 and Sam Gawel ‘23 has been visceral and physical; I’ve never seen more communities and campus organizations reach out, offer space and check in. The recent hate crime against a graduate student has also weighed heavily on campus. Top college leaders joined in this chorus, organizing a community gathering this past Friday. 




Yang, Greene and Matsunaga: Defining an Emergency Post-Roe

(09/22/22 8:00am)

In the wake of Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization — the U.S. Supreme Court decision that overturned Roe v. Wade — many are left wondering how to support doctors and clinics in states where abortion is now illegal. Our obstetrics and gynecology professors at Geisel School of Medicine suggest one idea: donate blood. As abortion access becomes increasingly sparse, doctors expect an uptick in patients with life-threatening bleeding when treating pregnancy-related complications such as ectopic pregnancy. As many people face traveling long distances to receive the care they need and providers in states where abortion is still legal become increasingly busy, we will likely see an increase in self-induced abortions without the trained help of medical providers. These procedures may increase preventable complications including excess bleeding, which would require utilizing supplies of donated blood that are already in high demand. 


Teszler: Campus Counts

(09/20/22 8:00am)

Last Tuesday, the undergraduate candidates for the New Hampshire House of Representatives, Miles Brown ’23 and Nicolás Macri ’24, finished fifth and sixth, respectively, in the Democratic primary — several hundred votes away from securing a spot in the general election. Last July, the current Student Government president, David Millman ’23, lost a race for Hanover selectboard by around 300 votes. The most recent student candidate to win a local election was Garrett Muscatel ’20, who ran unopposed in the 2018 Democratic primary for state house.




Verbum Ultimum: Dartmouth’s New Hope

(09/16/22 8:00am)

This summer, the College announced that Sian Leah Beilock would be taking over as President of the College following current President Phil Hanlon’s retirement at the end of this academic year. This news represents an important milestone in Dartmouth’s over 250-year history, as Beilock is the first ever woman to serve in this position. This Editorial Board joins the many students who celebrated the long overdue decision to elect a woman to lead the College, and we believe that Beilock’s background as an accomplished cognitive science researcher, a previous college administrator and a mother make her particularly well-qualified for this appointment. Additionally, her extensive educational experience at public institutions provides her with an outsider perspective that makes her uniquely qualified to tackle some of the most salient issues on Dartmouth’s campus.


Lane: It’s Time to Jumpstart Eastern Europe’s Future

(09/15/22 8:05am)

Many of us have seen the photos and videos coming out of the Kharkiv region of Ukraine over the past few days: abandoned tanks on roads, left-behind munitions, burnt-out wrecks of equipment littering fields and streets. Ukrainian forces have pulled off an incredible feat that hopefully will bring a swift end to Putin’s senseless and pointless war. But the fact of the matter is that wars do not truly end when peace returns. Wars end when societies have been healed, and that will take years. Now is the time to start planning to help heal Eastern Europe.


Hall: Biden’s Student Loan Bailout is a Bad Move

(09/15/22 8:00am)

President Joe Biden recently announced $10,000 in federal student loan forgiveness for borrowers earning less than $125,000 annually, or for couples earning less than $250,000, through a recent executive order. In addition, the plan also cancels up to $20,000 for Pell Grant recipients. Pell Grants are provided by the federal government — they do not have to be repaid, but recipients often take out additional loans to pay for higher education. Biden’s plan would provide complete debt cancellation for approximately 15 million borrowers and provide some relief for up to 40 million people. In addition to the bailout, the moratorium on student loan payments — a policy put in place at the beginning of the pandemic — was once again extended through the rest of the year. This marks the seventh extension of the payment pause. 


Allen: Life After Hours

(09/13/22 8:00am)

Life for Dartmouth students is busy and, in many ways, unpredictable. This is not news: Students take two or three classes — maybe even four — all the while juggling jobs, clubs, sports, friendships, family and all the other pressures of adulthood. Our days start early and end late, and despite our best intentions and meticulous planning, random inconveniences can happen without warning.








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