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The Dartmouth
April 14, 2024 | Latest Issue
The Dartmouth
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News

Women's crew in season finale at Eastern Sprints

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The season finale for the Big Green women's crew will come Sunday at the Eastern Sprints Championship on Lake Waramug in New Preston, Conn. During the season, the league's coaches ranked the Big Green as high as fifth, which is a dramatic improvement over years past. But the squad enters the weekend as the eighth seed in the varsity and second varsity event, after both boats lost to Cornell two weeks ago in Ithaca, N.Y.


News

Everyone but Harvard celebrates spring

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Spring festivals are not unique to Dartmouth -- most colleges and universities around the country, and all of the Ivy League schools with the exception of Harvard, host some kind of spring celebration. The main feature of most of these traditional weekends is drinking and fraternity/sorority parties, but at many schools the weekend has become a lot more than just drinking. How does Green Key Weekend stack up against the spring festivities at other schools? Well, it is mild in comparison with Columbia's annual spring festival.


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Japan-U.S. Relations are in transition

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Consul General of Japan Toshio Mochizuki described the current relationship between the United States and Japan and forecasted the path Japan will take in the future to a crowd of about 50 people last night. Mochizuki expressed concern that President Clinton's trade policies are beginning to reflect what he termed the "traditional Democratic party's inclination towards protectionist policies." He said the Japanese government is taking a more activist role in opening its markets by reducing customs duties and removing many unseen barriers to trade such as burdensome government regulations and weak enforcement of Japanese anti-trust law. Still, he said, the U.S.


News

Plaque marks the trail; 2,144 miles from Maine to Georgia

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During the summer, College students often see hikers wandering through campus, outfitted with enough gear to make the trek across the Green look like a trek across New Hampshire's White Mountains. The hikers are not lost -- just following the Appalachian Trail. A plaque commemorating the Appalachian Trail's path through Hanover was dedicated last weekend by officers of the Class of 1954 and the Dartmouth Outing Club. Hanover is one of only 12 towns the footpath passes through on its 2,144 mile route from Mt.


News

Dean awaits education department response

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Three weeks after an internal faculty review committee recommended the termination of the education department, the committee's report remains secret and the department continues to work on a response. But Professor Faith Dunne, the department chair, said the response may not come until Fall term. The report cited internal strife as one of several reasons for closing the department, according to administrators and professors who have seen the document which was submitted to Dean of Faculty James Wright. The Student Assembly has made repeated requests to see the report while students and faculty across campus can only speculate about the future of the College's teacher certification program. Wright said each member of the education department has a copy of the report and he is now awaiting a response. "I do not expect to hear from them before the end of the term," Wright said. According to Dunne the report will not be released until the department formulates a response.


News

Barksdale may quit as AAm leader

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The executive board of the Afro-American Society, the College's black students' organization, will hold a special meeting tonight to discuss the future of AAm President-elect Amiri Barksdale '96 who has said he might resign. The AAm usually holds general meetings on Thursdays but cancelled this week's meeting. Barksdale was elected Winter term to lead the AAm this summer and next year.


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Vermont limits smoking

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The Vermont State Legislature recently passed a law which will ban smoking in all buildings open to the public, possibly the toughest law of its kind in the country. The first stage of the law, which will ban smoking in government-owned buildings and buildings open to the general public, is scheduled to go into effect July 1.






News

Meadow appeal denied

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The Hanover zoning board Monday night rejected an appeal of its decision to allow a facility for people recovering from mental illness to move into town. Merry Meadow Farm received zoning board approval last month to establish a seven-patient facility at 1 Prospect Street, a house located at the intersection of Allen and Prospect Streets two blocks west of Everything But Anchovies. Hanover attorney William Clausen filed an appeal last week for Anne Johnson and Deborah Johnson Pyles, owners of the neighboring house.



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Litchfield '22 dies; Was Thayer HDIning Hall regular, sports fan

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Richard Charles Litchfield '22, a retired toymaker and ship chandler who was a well-known figure on the Dartmouth campus, died Monday at the Country Health Care Center in Lancanster, N.H.. He was 92. Litchfield died of cancer, said his daughter Betty Werner of Shelborne, N.H. "Old Man Thayer," as he was affectionately referred to by some students, frequented the College dining hall and was often spotted all over campus. "We would be part of his daily routine," said Joyce Blunt, an assistant in Baker Library.




News

Panel examines women's experiences at school

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Six senior women shared their lessons from four years at the College last night in a panel discussion that dealt with topics ranging from athletics and priorities to motherhood and fitting in. The panel discussion, titled "Will the Real Women of Dartmouth Please Stand Up?," was created by women in the Class of 1989.


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Alpha Theta works to fund scholarship

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Each fall and spring, members of Alpha Theta co-ed house do jobs through the Dickey Endowment, such as rake leaves, stack wood, wash cars and clean out garages to benefit the Alpha Theta scholarship. The $1,000 Alpha Theta scholarship is awarded once a year to an undergraduate with an interest in some aspect of international relations and studies. Last year's winner, Tamara Norman '94, used the money for travel and living expenses in the former Soviet Union where she spent Winter term translating children's books into English. Alpha Theta President Michael Stodghill '94 calls the Dickey jobs "a house bonding experience." House members often complain about doing Dickey jobs, Stodghill said.


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Larimore to leave College

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Colleen Larimore, director of the College's Native American Program, will leave Dartmouth at the end of the Spring term. Larimore's departure was announced in a letter released by Assistant Dean of Students Dan Nelson on May 4. According to Nelson, Larimore is planning to move to the San Francisco area to begin a doctoral studies program in sociology within the next year. Larimore received her undergraduate degree from Dartmouth in 1985 and she was president of Native Americans at Dartmouth, the College's Native American students' organization, during her senior year. From 1985 until 1989, Larimore was assistant director of admissions at the College and served temporarily as director of minority recruitment.


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Abroad to study Italian, women face sex assault

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SIENA, Italy -- The nature of relationships between Italian men and American women is not listed as a lecture topic on a syllabus for any Italian Language Study Abroad class. But many female students on the Dartmouth LSA here have found themselves wondering how to cope with a significant difference in attitudes toward gender relations. Dartmouth women have tried to ignore whistles, stares, comments and endless invitations to bars, parties and even homes.