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The Dartmouth
May 23, 2024 | Latest Issue
The Dartmouth
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News

East German author reads works

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German novelist, essayist and current Montgomery Fellow Christa Wolf gave a reading of her major works last night in Cook Auditorium. Wolf, born and raised in the former East Germany, has drawn on her life experiences to inspire her work.



News

Heat roils campus

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Keep those fans cranking and head for the river or the few air conditioned havens on campus, because temperatures will be in the 90s all weekend. The summer's first heat wave has descended on New Hampshire, sending students scurrying to find a way to cool off, whatever the cost. "We've had some record-breaking and near record-breaking heat," said Pat Wester of the National Weather Service in Concord. The mercury climbed to 97 degrees in the state capital on Wednesday, breaking a previous record of 96 degrees set in 1900, Wester said.



News

Head of DarTalk steps down

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Jules Pellerin recently retired from his full-time position as manager of Telephone Services, but the College will not hire a replacement. Instead, George Newkirk, director of the College's purchasing department, which oversees Telephone Services, will assume Pellerin's duties while maintaining his own position. Pellerin, 62, began working for the College as a lab technician in 1960 and moved into the purchasing department in 1963.


News

Thayer dean will return to teaching

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Dean of Thayer Engineering School Charles Hutchinson will step down next June after ten years of service to the College to return to what he loves doing most -- teaching. Hutchinson will take a year's sabbatical before returning to Thayer as a professor of computer and electrical engineering. A search committee, chaired by Engineering Professor Graham Wallis, will soon be appointed to find Hutchinson's successor. Hutchinson said there was no point in being in the education business if he did not like to teach.


News

Gay partners may get health benefits

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College President James Freedman is considering a plan to extend health benefits to the homosexual partners of College employees. A task force established by former Provost John Strohbehn completed a report last week outlining a plan to give employees' same-sex domestic partners the same benefits as legally married spouses. Although the report has not yet been released and a final decision will not be made until the College's benefits council and attorneys approve the plan, task force members say the College is committed to the principles involved. "The big decision has been made and we're going to move forward.


News

Pipes fills in as provost

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Bruce Pipes is now doing a job he might have gotten -- if he hadn't withdrawn his candidacy. But he still got the provost job, if only temporarily. Pipes will serve as the College's chief academic officer until the provost-designate, Lee Bollinger, the University of Michigan Law School dean, takes over next July. Pipes and Bollinger were both on the final list of four candidates in the search to succeed John Strohbehn.


News

DHMC cancer program reaches out to rural areas

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Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center's Norris Cotton Cancer Center has announced a new collaboration with New Hampshire and Vermont physicians which is designed to extend the reach of experimental cancer treatments to patients in local rural areas. The program is the first to directly involve community physicians in highly sophisticated investigational treatments, according to Dr. L.


News

Summer isn't just for sophomores

Amidst the scrambling to meet other '95s for picnics on the Green, bonding in debauchery in fraternity basements, climbing to the summit of Moosilauke and jumping off ropes into frigid waters in search of class unity, there are many students at Dartmouth this term who are not sophomores. Summer is for everybody, including '96s, '94s and '93s, exchange students and transfer students. Hanover's beauty is a magnet that attracts nature lovers who bike, hike, swim, jog, and revel in the sun.


News

Summer term reveals flaws in alcohol policy

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The reduced number of students on campus this term has revealed flaws in the College's alcohol policy. The policy, which took effect at the end of Winter term, is based on a mathematical formula and hinges on the number of students on campus who are of legal drinking age. If the policy is followed to the letter, then even if every student of legal drinking age on campus were expected to attend a party in a Greek house, there could be no more than a total of three and a half kegs on campus regardless of how many Greek organizations register parties. So far no more than two or three parties have been registered on any given night and the number of kegs on campus has not exceeded three and a half on any night. But Assistant Dean of Residential Life Deb Reinders said there is no cap on the number of parties that can go on in one night and hypothetically it is possible for the number of kegs on campus to exceed three and a half, according to Reinders. "When the alcohol policy is reviewed, that is something that the committee should look at," Reinders said. During the regular school year, the formula for the number of kegs allowed at a Greek house party depends on the number of legal drinkers expected throughout the night multiplied by the number of hours the party is expected to last.



News

IRS audit of the College underway

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The Internal Revenue Service is currently auditing the tax returns filed by Dartmouth in fiscal year 1991. Dartmouth was twice audited by the IRS, once in the 1970s and once in the 1980s, according to Associate Treasurer Win Johnson. IRS auditor Stephen Reale has traveled to Hanover several times in the past few weeks and may continue his work here through the summer or longer, Johnson said. "So far, we've had no feedback on anything awry," Johnson said.


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N.H. state meals tax affects non-students

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Faculty, administrators and other College employees now have to pay the 8 percent New Hampshire meals tax at the Courtyard Cafe in the Hopkins Center because of revisions to the state's meals and rooms tax. The College first started charging the tax yesterday. Under the amendment, educational organizations can no longer offer meals tax-free to faculty, administrators and other employees if the dining facility is open to the general public. Don Blume, fiscal manager of Dartmouth Dining Services, said the Courtyard Cafe will be the only campus dining facility to charge a meals tax because "the College encourages the general public to go there and the Cafe is open continuously even between terms, unlike Thayer Hall." Previously, the meals and rooms tax statute offered exemption to all school dining facilities regardless of whether public patrons were allowed. Non-students associated with the College can still eat without paying tax in Thayer Dining Hall because it is primarily a dining facility for students that is not open to the general public, Blume said. "The understanding is difficult and we're left with the job of interpreting it," Blume said. The revised law caused confusion yesterday at the Courtyard Cafe.


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Legal eagles; Freedman and Bollinger, attorneys at school

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Maybe it's a Daniel Webster thing. If the joke circulating across campus weren't, "How many intellectual, idealistic lawyers does it take to run this place?" It might well be: What don't College President James Freedman and provost-designate Lee Bollinger have in common? In the search for a provost, Freedman certainly seems to have picked a soul mate. Bollinger, the law school dean at the University of Michigan, was in Hanover earlier this week visiting classes and meeting with professors in the government department. In a brief interview during a walk across campus, he said, "I want to do whatever I can to help add to the intellectual life of the institution." It may sound familiar but it should hardly be surprising.



News

Strohbehn returns to faculty

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Professor John Strohbehn served his last day as Provost Wednesday after guiding the College's daily operations and long-term planning for seven years. Strohbehn, a member of the faculty for 30 years, will return to teaching and research in the Thayer School of Engineering after taking a year sabbatical to conduct research at Princeton University. Strohbehn chaired the Planning Steering Committee, which worked from 1988 to 1990 to produce a report outlining the College's long-term institutional goals. Chief among them were curriculum reform and campus expansion to the north of Baker library without significant change to the size of the student body. Dean of Faculty James Wright served on the six-person budget committee chaired by Strohbehn that was formed in 1989 to deal with the College's first budget crisis. "He was an exceptional Provost during the budgetary discussions of the past four years," Wright said.


News

Hovey's to become art gallery

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The Hovey Murals, boarded over since 1983 because of their controversial depiction of Native Americans, will be placed on permanent display next year when their home in Thayer Hall's basement is converted into a new art gallery. The murals, located in Hovey's Pub, will become part of the College's art collection under control of the Hood Museum, which will develop educational materials describing the art and its history. Hovey's Pub is scheduled to be relocated to the basement of the new Collis Center. The administration's decision, announced in late June by Provost John Strohbehn, signals the possible resolution of more than two decades of controversy surrounding the murals. Painted in the late1930s by Walter B.


News

Greek council officers elected

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Jen Main '95 of Delta Delta Delta sorority was elected summer president of the Co-ed Fraternity Sorority Council yesterday during elections for summer positions on the main Greek councils. The elections included posts for the CFSC and the Interfraternity and Panhellenic Councils. Jason Lombardelli '95, a member of Chi Gamma Epsilon fraternity, was elected vice president of the CFSC , and Tamara Busch '95, a member of Delta Gamma sorority, was elected Treasurer. David Shamberger '95, a member of Chi Gamma Epsilon fraternity, was elected as Student Assembly representative. Scott Swenson '95, a member of Gamma Delta Chi fraternity, was elected summer president of the IFC, the governing body of the College's fraternities. Claudia Ginsberg '95, was elected to the position of president of the Panhell, the governing body of the College's sororities. Main said she hopes to use the opportunity to make her experience with the Greek system more worthwhile. "One of they main goals we have is to promote the image of the Greek system," Main said.