Arts


Arts

The D-Constructed Cook: Hosting a Pandemic-Friendly Friendsgiving

Over the years, the idea of “Friendsgiving” — a Thanksgiving meal with friends — has become wildly popular, especially among college students. It’s a great excuse to host a dinner party, catch up with friends and share good food and drink. I have fond memories from my first two years at Dartmouth ...


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Arts

The D-Constructed Cook: Essential Building Blocks For Easy Everyday Meals

November 12, 2020 2:00am

There is nothing more defeating than walking into the kitchen ravenously hungry after a long day of work — and then having to cook. Expending the effort to plan a meal, prep ingredients, cook the dish and then clean afterward is simply tiresome, even for those who enjoy the act of cooking. If you’re on an off-term or taking classes while living off campus, preparing food can add another layer of stress to an already stressful day. But thankfully, all that stress is not necessary for quotidian cooking.


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arts

Review: Clipping’s ‘Visions of Bodies Being Burned’ offers terrifying narrative of America’s societal problems

November 9, 2020 2:05am

For the better part of the decade, experimental hip-hop group Clipping — stylized as clipping. — has played a pivotal role in the revitalization of horrorcore. Consisting of rapper Daveed Diggs — known for his role as Marquis de Lafayette and Thomas Jefferson in the 2015 Broadway hit “Hamilton” — and producers William Hutson and Jonathan Snipes, Clipping prides themselves on taking elements of horror films and transforming them into musical form. The trio’s name perfectly encapsulates their production style, as harsh, industrial noises overlay unnerving, spine-tingling screams and discord. 


Still North Books & Bar opened in Hanover last December.

arts

Q&A: Allie Levy ’11 on running Hanover’s Still North Books & Bar

November 9, 2020 2:00am

After graduating from Dartmouth, Allie Levy ’11 had two dreams. The first was that she would pursue a career aligning with her English major, potentially in bookselling. The second was that she might one day come back to Hanover. Last winter, Levy fulfilled both. She had a soft opening for the Main Street bookstore Still North Books & Bar on Dec. 19 of last year. The space is airy, calming and filled with a diverse collection of books that Levy hopes both students and Upper Valley residents can enjoy. 


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Arts

'Faith, Hope and Charity' tells a hauntingly resonant story

November 6, 2020 2:10am

The Dartmouth theater department’s MainStage production for the term, “Faith, Hope and Charity,” premiered this past weekend, marking the department’s first-ever radio play. Adapted from the original German play written by Ödön von Horváth and translated by Péter Fábri, the production brings the European story into an American context. 


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Arts

Opera singer Nicole Heaston discusses inclusivity in opera

November 2, 2020 2:15am

On Tuesday night, the Hopkins Center for the Arts hosted renowned opera singer Nicole Heaston for a discussion surrounding her celebrated opera career and her thoughts on the industry overall for her first event as an artist in residence. During the event, Heaston shared notable clips from her past performances and details regarding her experiences in the world of opera with the Dartmouth community.


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Arts

Review: ‘Borat Subsequent Moviefilm’ shines light on misogyny in Trump-era America

November 2, 2020 2:10am

The much-anticipated “Borat” sequel, “Borat Subsequent Moviefilm,” is as politically timely as it is funny. Starring Sacha Baron Cohen and directed by Jason Woliner, the film, released Oct. 23, outdoes its predecessor with its bold, high stakes pranks and rich political satire. At its core, “Borat Subsequent Moviefilm” makes a powerful critique of how misogyny is frequently overlooked in President Donald Trump’s America.


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arts

Q&A: ‘Missionaries’ author Phil Klay ’05 on his new novel, modern warfare

October 26, 2020 2:05am

In 2014, Iraq war veteran Phil Klay ’05 won the National Book Award for fiction with his debut short story collection, “Redeployment.” This year, he published his first novel, “Missionaries,” which tells the story of terrorism, drug wars and global conflict in Colombia through four intertwined perspectives. The story follows U.S. Army Special Forces medic Mason, foreign correspondent Lisette, Colombian officer Juan Pablo and Colombian militia lieutenant Abel as they struggle to navigate life in the midst of war. Klay’s work has been heavily influenced by his time serving in the U.S. Marines. 


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Arts

The D-Constructed Cook: Essential Cookware for an Off Term

October 22, 2020 2:00am

Despite its variable reviews, Dartmouth Dining is undoubtedly reliable. Quick snack? Check out Collis. Need to refuel after a workout? Foco has a bounty of options. We are nurtured in the womb that is Dartmouth, and when we leave, we are left to fend for ourselves. Outside of the bubble, we face the unforgiving reality of having to cook for ourselves.


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Arts

Review: Joji’s ‘Nectar’ feels forgettable save for a few standout tracks

October 19, 2020 2:00am

Over the past few years, former YouTube star George Miller — better known as Joji — has become one of the most popular internet artists in the mainstream world of music. Given his background, a career in serious music sounds unlikely; under his YouTube personality “Filthy Frank,” Joji was known for his dark, gross-out humor and his wild alter ego, Pink Guy. However, Joji’s transition from fringe YouTube comedian to mainstream R&B artist was more successful than anyone could have imagined.


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Arts

Review: ‘Enola Holmes’ offers fresh, female-focused take on Sherlock Holmes

October 15, 2020 2:00am

“Enola Holmes” — one of the newest entries to Netflix’s catalog, based on the young adult series by Nancy Springer — is a fun, adventurous and action-packed film that brilliantly reinvents the Sherlock Holmes franchise. Directed by Harry Bradbeer and written by Jack Thorne, “Enola Holmes” centers on the life of the youngest Holmes sibling, Enola (Millie Bobby Brown), and her journey to reunite with her missing mother while forging her own sense of freedom. While the film contains some elements of the classic Holmes mysteries, it adds a new twist with its focus on social activism and female intellect. From start to finish, the film successfully creates a world that places a strong-willed heroine center-stage, offering a timeless lesson on female empowerment.


Claire Burner '20, one of this year's studio art interns, experiments with photography in her work, "Reverberation."

Arts

Studio art interns bridge student-faculty gap amid COVID-19

October 12, 2020 2:00am

For nearly 30 years, the studio art department has selected five seniors or recent graduates with studio art majors or minors to participate in a year-long internship with the department. This year, however, the constraints of remote learning have forced the program to change.


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Arts

Hopkins Center promotes student engagement through #SmallScreenFun

October 8, 2020 2:10am

Since April, the Hopkins Center for the Arts’ virtual cinema program, #SmallScreenFun, has provided Dartmouth community members with the opportunity to stream films and join live Q&As featuring filmmakers, film scholars and celebrity guests. This term, the Hop has given students a greater role in the program, allowing them to act as moderators and ask guests questions.


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Arts

Review: ‘Mexican Gothic’ is a Victorian Gothic novel for now

October 8, 2020 2:00am

Silvia Moreno-Garcia’s New York Times best-seller “Mexican Gothic” is a lush, moody story brimming with horror and mystery. With all the trappings of a Victorian novel, “Mexican Gothic,” which was released in June, calls upon notable doomed heroines in the literary canon, from Ophelia in “Hamlet” to Cathy in “Wuthering Heights,” in order to place readers in its melodramatic prose. “Mexican Gothic” is your favorite Brontë novel, but better.


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arts

‘Make It At Home’ virtual workshop series offers creative outlet for students

October 1, 2020 2:00am

The Hopkins Center for the Arts has offered workshops to students since the 1940s, and quarantine has by no means put an end to this practice. According to ceramics instructor Jennifer Swanson, workshops turned to a virtual format during the summer term, with instructors mailing students supplies and guiding the classes over Zoom. Titled the “Make It At Home” workshop series, the virtual program includes workshops focusing on woodworking, ceramics and jewelry-making skills. 


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