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Dartmouth College Wind Ensemble concert to feature student, community performers

(02/18/22 7:00am)

This Saturday at 7:30 p.m., the Hopkins Center for the Arts will host the Dartmouth College Wind Ensemble in Spaulding Auditorium as they perform a variety of pieces from the 2020 Dartmouth Wind Ensemble Composition Competition. Among this musical selection will be the world premiere of two compositions: “Journeys III,” composed by Quinn Mason, and “Cerro y Nube,” composed by Eduardo Aguilar. The performance was arranged by Wind Ensemble Director Brian Messier and features both student performers and musicians from the Upper Valley community.  


Anaïs Mitchell and Bonny Light Horseman bring folk sounds and whimsical storytelling to the Hopkins Center

(02/15/22 7:05am)

Anaïs Mitchell — along with band partners Josh Kaufman and Eric Johnson, the three of whom make up Bonny Light Horseman — will perform today at 8 p.m. in Spaulding Auditorium at the Hopkins Center for the Arts. Mitchell will kick off the show playing original songs from her past albums and hit musical, “Hadestown,” and midway through the performance, she will be joined by Kaufman and Johnson, according to Hop program manager Karen Henderson. 


Review: ‘Red Rocket’ Brilliantly Explores the Cost of Desire

(02/15/22 7:00am)

This past Friday, the Hopkins Center for the Arts screened “Red Rocket” for a nearly full audience of students and community members. The celebrated film studio behind the movie, A24, released the dark comedy in December 2021, which was directed by Sean Baker (best known for his previous film, The Florida Project). Set in a Texan town on the Gulf Coast, “Red Rocket” centers on aging former porn star Mikey Saber (Simon Rex) as he returns to his hometown, Texas City. Desperate and penniless, he arrives at the house of his ex-wife, Lexi (Bree Elrod), and despite some hesitation, she eventually lets him stay and soon rekindles their romance. Mikey settles into a rhythm in Texas City — running a weed business out of a local donut shop, biking around the town and driving to strip clubs with his awkward younger neighbor, Lonnie (Ethan Darbone).





Review: ‘The Love Hypothesis’ is a Guide to Feeling Something on Valentines Day

(02/10/22 7:05am)

Reading “The Love Hypothesis” feels like gaining all the perks of graduate school without actually having to attend a university. Author Ali Hazelwood creates a fake relationship between cheery Olive Smith, a Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University, and standoffish Adam Carlsen, a tenured professor and MacArthur Fellow. When Anh, Olive’s best friend, starts dating Olive’s former fling, Olive attempts to show that she is unbothered. Olive tells Anh that she’s also dating someone, and to prove it, Olive kisses the first man she sees: Adam. To her surprise, Adam then proposes the idea of “fake-dating” for their mutual benefit. Adam can project the image of having “roots” at Stanford so his department will stop expecting his departure after the completion of his research, and Olive can keep up her lie to Anh. The cliche of fake-dating, while drastically overused, still finds a way to my heart each time. 


Indigenous photographer Cara Romero will speak at the Hood this Wednesday

(02/08/22 7:00am)

On Feb. 9, the Hood Museum of Art will host a talk with Cara Romero, moderated by curator of Indigenous art Jami Powell. Three of Romero’s pieces — “Kaa,” “Oil Boom” and “Water Memory” — are currently on display in two exhibitions in the Hood: “Unbroken: Native American Ceramics, Sculpture and Design” and “This Land: American Engagement with the Natural World.”


Alum Spotlight: Matthew Heineman ‘05 discusses his new film ‘The First Wave’

(02/03/22 7:00am)

Matthew Heineman ’05 has filmed in conflict zones around the world and received glowing praise in the most elite circles of film. Most recently, he shot at a hospital in Queens, New York at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Heineman entered the field after graduation and is now a renowned filmmaker. 


Review: 'To Paradise' Took Me to Three Different Americas, Left Me Begging for More

(02/01/22 7:00am)

Like many other book lovers, I found myself trapped in the confines of “BookTok,” the community of TikTok users who share and discuss book recommendations, at the height of quarantine. The BookTok canon is both particular and chaotic, filled with young adult novels like “The Song of Achilles” and messy romance books like “Red, White, & Royal Blue.” Hanya Yanagihara’s 2015 book “A Little Life,” though not in the same genre, is still adored by those in the BookTok community. “A Little Life,” which attracted a strong fanbase but received mixed reviews from critics, operated on extremes and had a profound emotional impact on readers. My reaction to it was ambivalent. The novel operated on such insane highs and desperate lows that I was frankly left trying to recover emotionally. Yanagihara’s newest novel, “To Paradise,” elicited a similar response. 



Review: 'Last Night at the Telegraph Club' is the Novel I Wish I Had in Middle School

(01/27/22 7:05am)

It’s been a while since I exited my young adult literature phase. Throughout seventh and eighth grade, I consumed YA novels as if my life depended on it — at least two a week at my peak. Since then, I’ve tried to reignite my excitement surrounding the genre that inspired me to fall in love with reading, but I haven’t been able to do so since middle school.


Review: 'Hype House' Reveals the Misery of Being an Influencer

(01/25/22 7:05am)

In the past decade, social media influencers have grown more and more in popularity. First, it was on YouTube. Then, it was on Instagram. Now, with TikTok, it’s easier than ever to become famous. On the Netflix reality show “Hype House,” these influencers break out of our phone screens and onto our televisions.


Student Spotlight: student artist Alice Crow ’22 creates multimedia, layered works

(01/25/22 7:00am)

Alice Crow ’22 produces abstract works that deal with themes of the subconscious and nature. Double majoring in studio art and history, Crow currently works as a campus engagement intern at the Hood Museum of Art where she helps connect students to the museum and curate an upcoming exhibit.


79th Golden Globe Awards proceed as a private event

(01/20/22 7:00am)

On Jan. 9, the 79th Golden Globe Awards took place at the Beverly Hilton in Los Angeles, in a ceremony vastly different from any previous Golden Globe Awards. Last year, the ceremony followed a hybrid format, in which some celebrities attended in-person and others made virtual appearances. Still, the 2021 Golden Globes were televised to the public. This year’s ceremony did not include a red carpet or a televised broadcast of the event. This decision resulted from concerns about the lack of diversity among the Hollywood Foreign Press Association’s members and nominations. 




Student Spotlight: Abigail Smith ’23 explores the Southern Gothic genre’s representations of people of color

(01/18/22 7:05am)

On Jan. 14, the Hood Museum of Art hosted Conroy intern Abigail Smith ’23 for the latest installment of the museum’s “A Space for Dialogue” series. During the Hood’s first in-person gallery talk since winter 2020, Smith discussed her curated collection, “Southern Gothic,” which examines the complex and often macabre world of the Southeastern U.S. Featuring pieces from the Jim Crow era to the 2010s, Smith’s collection aims to capture both the darkness and light of the Southern Gothic era, according to the event’s promotional materials.


‘The Force of Things: An Opera for Objects’ brings environmentally-minded theater to Dartmouth

(01/13/22 7:00am)

Loosely categorized as an “opera,” “The Force of Things: An Opera for Objects” is an intense visual and sonic performance intended to engage with the ramifications of climate change through a collective audience experience. The performance will take place from Jan. 13 to Jan 16 at the Moore Theater in the Hopkins Center for the Arts. It is created by sibling duo Adam Fure and music professor Ash Fure and co-directed by music professor César Alvarez. Ash Fure also works as a music professor at Dartmouth, and Adam Fure is an architecture professor at the University of Michigan.


Alum Spotlight: studio art intern Phoebe Kong ’21 prepares for 2022 exhibitions

(01/11/22 7:00am)

Studio art intern Phoebe Kong ’21 sits at the desk of her studio in the Black Family Visual Arts Center. As one of five chosen interns, she will spend the year building her portfolio and assisting in undergraduate art classes before applying to MFA programs. Behind her is a collage wall composed of various prints of her family, each connected by her various drawing studies. 




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