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Eligible students receive stimulus checks, professors weigh in on effectiveness

(04/02/21 6:00am)

On March 11, President Joe Biden signed into law the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, a $1.9 trillion pandemic relief package that, among other measures, included $1,400 stimulus checks. Since the cash payments began hitting American bank accounts on March 17, some Dartmouth students have received the payments and put the funds toward their expenses.




de Wolff: Two Doses, Two Standards

(04/01/21 6:00am)

On March 25, New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu announced that all New Hampshire residents 16 years and older would be eligible to receive the Covid-19 vaccine beginning April 2. This expansion of eligibility allows college students hailing from New Hampshire or who have established residency here to receive the vaccine, but Sununu specified that out-of-state college students will not qualify. The governor’s office believes that limited vaccine supplies should go to the state’s residents rather than out-of-state college students.



“The Radical Joy Project” frees student creative spirits via a collaborative multimedia performance

(04/01/21 6:00am)

“The Radical Joy Project” is a mixed media student performance series showcasing a wide range of art forms including music, theater and dance. The project seeks to convey the joy and liberation that art can bring, through singing, acting and dancing. In three parts — “The Past,” “The Present” and “The Future” — the performance explores the overarching theme of joy, with a focus on finding joy in the current trying times. The series is set to premiere on April 8 and 9 at 8 p.m. on the Hopkins Center for the Arts's Youtube channel. 



The Things We Carry

(03/31/21 6:20am)

Even during a normal year, Dartmouth students are a mobile group. Between off-terms, study abroads and our extra-long winter break, many students find themselves changing housing situations relatively often. However, as COVID-19 continues to restrict the stability and availability of on-campus housing, students’ movements in and out of campus have shifted from periodic to constant.


Q&A: Medicine Professor Elizabeth Talbot on What You Need to Know About the COVID-19 Vaccines

(03/31/21 6:10am)

Earlier this month, the College announced a partnership with the state of New Hampshire to begin vaccinating eligible students and employees for COVID-19. The vaccines are soon expected to become even more widely available, as Gov. Chris Sununu announced that all New Hampshire residents 16 and older will be able to register for a vaccine appointment starting April 2, this Friday. The Dartmouth spoke with Elizabeth Talbot, Geisel School of Medicine professor, infectious disease physician at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and New Hampshire deputy state epidemiologist, about vaccine efficacy and the implications for Dartmouth students. 


Students Consider Spring Term in Light of Winter Outbreak

(03/31/21 6:05am)

As spring begins, many students are left wondering what they can expect from this upcoming term. After a fall term with low rates of COVID-19 transmission, the College loosened some restrictions on campus life for the winter; for example, students were able to visit other residential facilities following the quarantine period and no reservations were required to study in Baker-Berry Library. However, in the final weeks of the term, COVID-19 cases skyrocketed — with the number of active student cases reaching 143 at the outbreak’s peak — causing campus to revert back to phase two of arrival quarantine. Though that wave has receded, an air of uncertainty remains around what awaits students this spring.


Editors' Note

(03/31/21 6:00am)

And so we meet again, remote spring term. We’ve been navigating Zoom University for over a year now, yet the thought of joining a classroom from a computer screen is still strange. But whether it’s the change in the weather or the promise of imminent vaccinations, there is no doubt that this remote spring term will be different. With hope on the horizon, Dear Old Dartmouth is starting to feel familiar again. 





Lightweight rower Cooper Tuckerman ’22 competes in U.S. Olympic Trials

(03/30/21 6:00am)

Last month, lightweight rower Cooper Tuckerman ’22 competed in the U.S.Olympic Team trials in Sarasota, Florida. Despite not making the team for the upcoming Olympics in Tokyo, Tuckerman enjoyed being able to race again after almost a year — a tumultuous one that saw the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the termination of the Dartmouth men’s lightweight rowing team and the subsequent reinstatement of that team. 



Opinion Asks: COVID-19 Vaccinations for Dartmouth Students

(03/30/21 7:00am)

As COVID-19 vaccines become more readily available around the nation, New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu has announced that out-of-state students will not be eligible for vaccination in the state. Given this recent announcement, how do you think Dartmouth should respond? Does the College have an obligation to help secure vaccines for all students or is it more important that Dartmouth yields to state rules?


Despite College recommendations, many students traveled over spring break

(03/30/21 6:00am)

In an email announcement sent in February to students approved for spring on-campus access, Dean of the College Kathryn Lively wrote that students living locally were “strongly encouraged” to remain in the Upper Valley over spring break. While some students observed the College’s advice and stayed in the area, others traveled during spring break to spend time with family, alleviate stress between terms or due to a lack of interim on-campus housing.




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