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A Credibility Gap

(08/08/01 9:00am)

While many in the Dartmouth community are resigned to the impending presence of Safety and Security officers in Greek houses, I question whether enough attention has been paid to the true rationale for the new policy. It is clear that the College is committed to the policy and within its legal rights. Nonetheless, it is much less clear why such a policy is necessary. As members of the administration have attempted to spin this unwanted intrusion as merely a student safety measure, they have created a credibility gap between their stated and true motives.


The Danger of Missile Defense

(08/08/01 9:00am)

I am currently working in Washington D.C. for a lobby to reduce weapons of mass destruction. Although I agree with proponents of a national missile defense in their intent to create a more peaceful deterrence strategy, I am bothered by their alarmist approach to this issue, and their insistence upon deploying the system, even if it could create another arms race and force America to unilaterally withdraw from treaties. Opponents of a rushed deployment of missile defense worry about funds being siphoned from domestic programs to support defense (Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee Carl Levin has indicated that by 2003 the defense budget will most likely cut into the Medicare trust fund), but we also harbor many deeper concerns.







Play delights 'midsummer' crowd

(08/06/01 9:00am)

Two half-naked silhouettes crouched in the brambles above the BEMA. In a momentously orchestrated flood of light, fifty beach balls surged down the hill, rolling to a halt just short of the bemused audience. Tom Dugdale '03 and Benjiman Weaver '03's mischevious and vibrantly acted rendition of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" -- complete with flitting fairies and unrequited amorous lovers in cheerleading and football-player garb -- was nothing short of a hit.


A Call for Missile Defense

(08/06/01 9:00am)

The recent successful intercept by the ExoAtmospheric Kill Vehicle has again raised the profile of the United States' controversial national missile defense (NMD) system. It is deemed to undermine global stability by breaking the Anti-Ballistic Missile treaty. Its cost is derided by all those who feel that $100 billion could be better spent on social programs or other defense spending items. There are also constant claims that such a system would not work, or in any case is designed to face a threat that is obsolete. While all of these arguments make good sound bites for cost cutting politicians, the NMD system promises America a future that is morally superior to the past we will leave behind, less expensive (when put into perspective) than it might seem, and militarily aligned for a defensive peace rather than an offensive war.


Fascism at Dartmouth?

(08/06/01 9:00am)

It is a well-known and often stated fact that Dartmouth College can legally deny its students rights guaranteed to all citizens by the Constitution of the United States. As a private institution, it can create its own rules, and it is not bound by the Bill of Rights. Because students make a conscious decision to go here, they agree to abide by the rules of the College, even if these rules are in conflict with the rights guaranteed to us in the Bill of Rights. When we matriculated, we all signed a piece of paper to this effect, thereby agreeing to it. The theory behind allowing private institutions such power is valid: private institutions that people voluntarily join should have every right to establish their own sets of standards, even if a right is slightly abridged here or there to help create a more desirable community. However, in the case of Dartmouth, the denial of rights is nearly comical, as College policy amounts to a veritable trampling of the Bill of Rights. Observe: