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Rockefeller Center event evaluates ‘fragile state’ of American political institutions

(01/25/21 7:00am)

On Thursday — one day after the inauguration of President Joe Biden and two weeks after an insurrectionist mob stormed the Capitol — the Rockefeller Center for Public Policy hosted an online panel of political science experts for a wide-ranging discussion titled “Did the System Work? The Fragile State of American Institutions.”



Jake Sullivan, former Dartmouth teaching fellow, to serve as Biden’s national security adviser

(11/29/20 12:37am)

President-elect Joe Biden announced on Monday that Jake Sullivan — a resident teaching fellow at Dartmouth from winter 2019 to spring 2020 — will serve as his national security adviser. At 44, Sullivan will be the youngest national security adviser in decades.


Students confront housing shortage, high living costs in Upper Valley

(11/10/20 7:05am)

A regional housing shortage in the Upper Valley and the resulting high cost of living has posed an array of challenges for students in search of off-campus housing. In recent months, the College has placed a limit on the number of students allowed in dorms due to COVID-19 concerns, which has further increased demand for housing off campus.



Citing privacy, College maintains decision to withhold number of students sent home

(10/29/20 6:10am)

As rumors continue to circulate surrounding students who have been sent home for violating the College’s COVID-19 policies, multiple members of the College’s administration have cited privacy concerns as the rationale behind Dartmouth’s refusal to release the number of students impacted. Many on campus have criticized the College for a lack of transparency.


Q&A: Sen. Jeanne Shaheen on partisanship, upcoming election

(10/26/20 6:00am)

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., is the first woman in American history to have served both as governor and as a U.S. senator. In the Senate, she sits on the Appropriations, Armed Services and Foreign Relations committees, among others. Shaheen has also held legislative office at the state level, serving two terms in New Hampshire’s state Senate in the 1990s. Outside of elected office, Shaheen has served as a teacher at Dover and Water Valley High Schools, owned a small retail business and directed the Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics.



Zoom usage raises questions about student data, security

(10/02/20 6:05am)

Since the beginning of the pandemic, the video-conferencing platform Zoom has dominated higher education, with many colleges and universities adopting the technology as a temporary substitute for in-person instruction. Though Zoom allows students to remain connected to their academic experience, as well as with family and friends, the wide-scale adoption of the platform has raised questions around student data and privacy.


Q&A with science podcaster, Netflix host Latif Nasser ’08

(09/15/20 6:00am)

Latif Nasser ’08 is the director of research at Radiolab, a Peabody Award- winning podcast and nationally syndicated radio program on predominantly science-related stories, with subjects ranging from snowflake photography to medieval robots. He is also the host of the new Netflix special, “Connected,” which explores the connections between seemingly distinct phenomena, and of the recent Radiolab miniseries “The Other Latif,” in which Nasser follows the drama-filled story of a detainee at Guantanamo Bay with whom he shares a name. As an undergraduate at Dartmouth, Nasser was president of the Displaced Theater Company, tutored at the Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology and was chosen by his graduating class to speak on Class Day.


A look into DHMC’s multifaceted relationship with the College and the Upper Valley

(09/11/20 7:15am)

As Dartmouth welcomes students back to campus amid an ongoing public health crisis, the College’s relationship with the nearby Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center has become more important than ever. The medical center, part of Dartmouth-Hitchcock’s network of more than 1,800 providers serving nearly two million patients across northern New England, has historically served an important role to both the College and Upper Valley community, and continues to do so throughout the pandemic.


Student’s involuntary hospitalization raises questions about Unmasked app policies

(08/21/20 6:30am)

Following the involuntary hospitalization of a student who expressed suicidal thoughts on the anonymous, student-run mental health app Unmasked in late July, questions have arisen surrounding the role of app moderators and the College in sharing students’ information and involving law enforcement.


Anxiety and Anticipation: Kendal Residents, Upper Valley Community Respond to the College’s Reopening Plan

(07/31/20 7:15am)

Without a single reported case of COVID-19, Hanover’s Kendal Retirement Community has been lucky in avoiding the reach of the pandemic so far. But with thousands of Dartmouth undergraduates soon to be returning to campus from all over the country and world — some likely to be traveling from infection hotspots — the possibility of spread to the town and to other vulnerable Upper Valley communities like Kendal has become a source of uneasiness.





College, Dartmouth community grapple with risk of coronavirus

(03/06/20 7:15am)

In response to the recent exposure of members of the Dartmouth community to novel coronavirus, the College is grappling with how to manage and respond to the virus and its potential risks to more individuals. At the same time, students and community members are dealing with the reality of possible changes to everyday life. 


State voting law awaits lawsuit verdict, no direct effect on primary

(02/11/20 7:00am)

Two Dartmouth students are awaiting a decision by the New Hampshire Supreme Court on their ACLU-backed voting rights case against New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner (D) and NH Attorney General Gordon MacDonald (R) regarding New Hampshire House Bill 1264. The bill, which was signed into law by Gov. Chris Sununu (R) in March, modified the definition of a New Hampshire “resident” and “residency.”