Joyce Lee


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Arts

This year's Oscar-nominated shorts have surprising depth

Last Saturday, I went to watch the Hopkins Center’s screening of the collection of Oscar-nominated live-action short films without a clue of what I was getting into. I hadn’t looked up any of the films before my viewing, and in my innocence, I assumed that the brevity of the shorts meant they would toe the line between light-hearted and meaningful. They would not be too dark or bleak, I assured myself, before the lights went dim and the title card for the first short appeared on the screen.


Arts

Review: ‘Brooklyn Nine-Nine’ reveals the goodness of humanity

There was a moment of collective solidarity on the Internet — which is really rare, considering it’s the Internet — when Fox announced the cancellation of “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” in May of 2018. Fans of the show, from Lin Manuel-Miranda to Guillermo del Toro, all tweeted their outrage, leading to the show’s resurrection at NBC a mere 31 hours after the announcement of its cancellation. 


Arts

Marie Kondo’s new show doesn’t have to do more than ‘spark joy’

When I returned home for the winter holidays this past November, my parents announced on the drive back from the airport that we were moving out of the home we had lived in for the last 14 years. I reacted as anyone might after an abrupt announcement that they were losing their childhood home: nervous laughter, and then an incredulous “What?”


Arts

'Burning' is a riveting drama about masculinity and desire

There’s an image in Lee Chang-dong’s “Burning” that I still see when I close my eyes at night: a little boy approaches a burning greenhouse. He is inexplicably dripping wet — with water? with gasoline? — and he stares at the flames in a trance.


Arts

Review: ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ cannot have it all

Last June, Australian comedian Hannah Gadsby released her Netflix stand-up special “Nanette.” The show received critical acclaim and an entire literature of think-pieces, not because it was especially funny or because the jokes were radical (although they were), but because Gadsby used her special to question what it means to use self-deprecating comedy as a woman, a queer individual and as an “other” who exists in the margins.



Arts

Review: 'Sorry to Bother You' is an insane, surrealist ride

There’s crazy, there’s satire, there’s dystopian, and then there’s “Sorry to Bother You.” Musician Boots Riley’s 2018 directorial debut takes place in an alternative-world Oakland — but don’t let the term “alternative-world” fool you.



Arts

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ is an addition to the Asian-American canon

A working-class woman meets an outrageously rich man, and they fall in love in much to the derision and outrage of the man’s family (mostly his mother). It’s a classic formula, seen in works like “Pride and Prejudice” to which some critics have compared “Crazy Rich Asians,” the romantic-comedy released this summer that featured an all-Asian cast.


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